Browse code

remove the duplicate trunk.

Andrew Lewman authored on27/08/2013 03:29:40
Showing552 changed files
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-/Makefile.local
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-.deps
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-
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-about/board.html.en
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-about/contact.html.en
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-about/contributors.html.en
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-about/corepeople.html.en
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-about/financials.html.en
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-about/gsoc.html.en
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-about/overview.html.en
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-about/sponsors.html.en
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-about/torusers.html.en
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-about/translators.html.en
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-about/volunteers.html.en
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-about/jobs-browserhacker.html.en
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-about/jobs-coredev.html.en
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-about/jobs-pluggabletransport.html.en
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-about/jobs-projectcoordinator.html.en
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-about/jobs-translatorsupport.html.en
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-about/jobs.html.en
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-docs/N900.html.en
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-docs/android.html.en
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-docs/bridges.html.en
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-docs/debian-vidalia.html.en
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-docs/debian.html.en
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-docs/documentation.html.en
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-docs/faq-abuse.html.en
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-docs/faq.html.en
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-docs/hidden-services.html.en
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-docs/installguide.html.en
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-docs/manual.html.en
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-docs/pluggable-transports.html.en
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-docs/proxychain.html.en
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-docs/rpms.html.en
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-docs/running-a-mirror.html.en
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-docs/short-user-manual.html.en
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-docs/signing-keys.html.en
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-docs/tor-doc-osx.html.en
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-docs/tor-doc-relay.html.en
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-docs/tor-doc-unix.html.en
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-docs/tor-doc-web.html.en
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-docs/tor-doc-win32.html.en
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-docs/tor-doc-windows.html.en
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-docs/tor-hidden-service.html.en
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-docs/tor-manual-dev.html.en
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-docs/tor-manual.html.en
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-docs/tor-relay-debian.html.en
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-docs/trademark-faq.html.en
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-docs/verifying-signatures.html.en
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-donate/become-sponsor.html.en
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-donate/donate-hardware.html.en
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-donate/donate-service.html.en
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-donate/donate.html.en
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-donate/matching-program.html.en
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-donate/thankyou.html.en
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-download/download-easy.html.en
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-download/download-unix.html.en
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-download/download.html.en
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-eff/tor-dmca-response.html.en
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-eff/tor-legal-faq.html.en
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-getinvolved/mirrors.html.en
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-getinvolved/open-positions.html.en
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-getinvolved/research.html.en
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-getinvolved/relays.html.en
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-getinvolved/translation-overview.html.en
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-getinvolved/translation.html.en
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-getinvolved/tshirt.html.en
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-getinvolved/volunteer.html.en
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-index.html.en
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-press/2008-12-19-roadmap-press-release.html.en
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-press/2009-03-12-performance-roadmap-press-release.html.en
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-press/2010-03-25-tor-store-press-release.html.en
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-press/2010-09-16-ten-things-circumvention-tools.html.en
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-press/2011-08-28-tor-022-stable.html.en
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-press/inthemedia.html.en
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-press/press.html.en
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-projects/arm.html.en
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-projects/gettor.html.en
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-projects/obfsproxy-debian-instructions.html.en
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-projects/obfsproxy-instructions.html.en
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-projects/obfsproxy.html.en
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-projects/onionoo.html.en
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-projects/projects.html.en
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-projects/sampleproject.html.en
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-projects/torbrowser-details.html.en
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-projects/torbrowser.html.en
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-projects/tordnsel.html.en
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-projects/torweather.html.en
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-projects/vidalia.html.en
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-torbutton/index.html.en
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-torbutton/torbutton-faq.html.en
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-torbutton/torbutton-options.html.en
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-
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-RewriteEngine On
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-
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-# moved to /docs/
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-RewriteRule ^faq(.*) /docs/faq$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^bridges(.*) /docs/bridges$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^abuse(.*) /docs/abuse$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^documentation(.*) /docs/documentation$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^verifying-signatures(.*) /docs/verifying-signatures$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^tor-manual(.*) /docs/tor-manual$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Torbutton
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-RewriteRule ^torbutton/design(.*) /torbutton/en/design$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Tor Browser
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-RewriteRule ^torbrowser/dist/(.*) /dist/torbrowser/$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^torbrowser/$ /projects/torbrowser.html.en [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^torbrowser(.*) /projects/torbrowser$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Overview
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-RewriteRule ^overview(.*) /about/overview$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Vidalia
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-RewriteRule ^vidalia/dist/(.*) /dist/vidalia/$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^vidalia(.*) /projects/vidalia [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Press
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-RewriteRule ^press/$ /press/press [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^press/index.html(.*) /press/press.html$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Projects
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-RewriteRule ^projects/$ /projects/projects [R=301,L]
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-
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-# GetInvolved
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-RewriteRule ^getinvolved/$ /getinvolved/volunteer [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^volunteer(.*) /getinvolved/volunteer$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^tshirt(.*) /getinvolved/tshirt$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-RewriteRule ^research(.*) https://research.torproject.org/ [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^getinvolved/research(.*) https://research.torproject.org/ [R=301,L]
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-
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-# other (feel free to categorize)
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-RewriteRule ^people(.*) /about/corepeople$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^donate/$ /donate/donate [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^contact(.*) /about/contact$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Download websites
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-RewriteRule ^download/$ /download/download [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^download.html(.*) /download/download.html$1 [R=301,L]
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-RewriteRule ^easy-download(.*) /download/download-easy$1 [R=301,L]
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-
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-# Relays
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-RewriteRule ^relays(.*) /getinvolved/relays [R=301,L]
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-# Directions for building the website:
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-#
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-# 1. Clone the Tor git repository and make TORGIT point to it:
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-#
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-# 	git clone git://git.torproject.org/tor/ tor.git
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-#
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-#    Note that you will need to point to the actual .git directory.
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-# 2. Edit include/versions.wmi or others if you like
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-# 3. Update STABLETAG and DEVTAG below if there is a new git tag
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-# 4. make
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-# 5. ./publish
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-
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-export STABLETAG=tor-0.2.3.25
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-export DEVTAG=tor-0.2.4.16-rc
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-
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-WMLBASE=.
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-SUBDIRS=docs eff projects press about download getinvolved donate torbutton 
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-include $(WMLBASE)/Makefile.local
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-
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-include $(WMLBASE)/Makefile.common
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-all: $(SUBDIRS)
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-
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-docs:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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-eff:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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-projects:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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-press:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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-about:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=.. 
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-download:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=.. 
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-getinvolved:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=.. 
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-donate:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..  
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-torbutton:
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-	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..  
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-mirrors:
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-	./update-mirrors.pl
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-translations:
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-	./po2wml.sh
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-qrcode:
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-	qrencode -o $(IMGROOT)/android/orbot-qr-code-latest.png \
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-    "https://www.torproject.org/dist/android/alpha-orbot-latest.apk"
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-
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-# XXX: this also depends on all subs' wmlfiles.  How to fix?
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-#translation-status.html.en: $(LANGS) $(WMIFILES) $(WMLFILES)
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-
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-.PHONY: docs eff projects press about download getinvolved donate torbutton
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-# Directions for adding a new language:
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-# 1. Add the two-letter code to LANGS below.
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-# 2. Add a new "%.html.es: es/%.wml en/%.wml" clause below.
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-# 3. Add a new ".deps/%.html.es.d: es/%.wml .deps/.stamp" clause below.
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-# 4. mkdir a new two-letter directory. Make sure there's a foot.wmi
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-#    and navigation.wmi.
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-# 5. Edit include/perl-globals.wmi, add to @LANGUAGES and %LANGUAGES.
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-#    You might find useful %LANGUAGES strings at the bottom of
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-#    http://debian.org/
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-# 6. Add a new images/es.png flag image.
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-
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-WMLOPT  = \
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-          -I $(WMLBASE)/include \
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-          -D DOCROOT=$(WMLBASE) \
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-          -D IMGROOT=$(WMLBASE)/images \
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-          -D TORGIT=$(TORGIT)\
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-          -D DEVTAG=$(DEVTAG) \
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-          -D STABLETAG=$(STABLETAG)
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-
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-#LANGS=ar bms cy da de en es et fa fi fr hu id it ja ko nl no pl pt pt-br ru se tr vn zh-cn
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-LANGS=en
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-
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-WMLFILES=$(wildcard $(patsubst %, %/*.wml, $(LANGS)))
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-WMIFILES=$(wildcard $(patsubst %, %/*.wmi, $(LANGS)) $(WMLBASE)/include/*.wmi )
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-
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-HTMLFILES=$(shell perl -le 's,  (.*)/(.*).wml  ,        $$2.html.$$1    ,x, print $$_ for @ARGV' $(WMLFILES))
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-DEPFILES=$(shell perl -le 's,  (.*)/(.*).wml  ,  .deps/$$2.html.$$1.d  ,x, print $$_ for @ARGV' $(WMLFILES))
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-
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-
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-all: $(HTMLFILES)
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-
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-%.html.en: en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.ar: ar/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.bms: bms/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.cy: cy/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.es: es/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.et: et/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.de: de/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.da: da/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.fa: fa/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.id: id/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.it: it/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.fi: fi/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.fr: fr/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.hu: hu/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.ja: ja/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.ko: ko/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.nl: nl/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.no: no/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.pl: pl/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.pt: pt/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.pt-br: pt-br/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.ru: ru/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.se: se/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.tr: tr/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.vi: vi/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.vn: vn/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-%.html.zh-cn: zh-cn/%.wml en/%.wml
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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-
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-.deps/%.html.en.d: en/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.ar.d: ar/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.bms.d: bms/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.cy.d: cy/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.es.d: es/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.et.d: et/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.de.d: de/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.da.d: da/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.id.d: it/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.it.d: it/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.fa.d: fa/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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-	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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-	rm -f $$tmpfile
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-.deps/%.html.fi.d: fi/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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-	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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-	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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-.deps/.stamp:
303
-	[ -d .deps ] || mkdir .deps
304
-	touch "$@"
305
-
306
-dep: $(DEPFILES)
307
-clean:
308
-	rm -f *.html.* .deps/*.html.*.d
309
-	for sub in $(SUBDIRS); do \
310
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311
-	done
312
-
313
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1
-# This is a sample for your Makefile.local.
2
-#
3
-# Copy this to Makefile.local and change the path to match your local
4
-# system.
5
-#
6
-
7
-# The path to a clone of the tor source code repository's .git dir.
8
-# Note that if your clone is a non-bare repository that you must not
9
-# leave out the .git part.
10
-#
11
-# e.g.:
12
-# export TORGIT=/home/weasel/projects/tor/tor/.git
13
-export TORGIT=set this to your tor.git path
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1
-## translation metadata
2
-# Revision: $Revision: 25942 $
3
-# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
-
5
-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Board of Directors" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
-	<div id="breadcrumbs">
8
-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
10
-    <a href="<page about/board>">Board of Directors</a>
11
-  </div>
12
-	<div id="maincol">
13
-  	<h1>Board of Directors</h1>
14
-    <table>
15
-    	<tr>
16
-        <td class="beige">
17
-	  <div class="name">Roger Dingledine</div>
18
-	  <div class="caps">President and Director</div>
19
-	    <p>Original developer of Tor along with Nick Mathewson and Paul Syverson. Leading researcher in the anonymous communications field.  Frequent speaker at conferences to advocate Tor and explain what Tor is and can do. Helps coordinate academic researchers.</p>
20
-	</td>
21
-	<td>
22
-          <div class="name">Meredith Hoban-Dunn</div>
23
-	  <div class="caps">Audit Committee Chair</div>
24
-           <p>Meredith is an accomplished accountant, advisor, and banker.  Her role is to help us make sure we're able to pass our corporate audits correctly, watch for internal fraud, tell us when we're doing things in a non-standard way, and so on.</p>
25
-        </td>
26
-      </tr>
27
-      <tr>
28
-        <td>
29
-          <div class="name">Ian Goldberg</div>
30
-	  <div class="caps">Chairman of the Board</div>
31
-          <p>Cryptographer, privacy expert, and professor; one of the designers of <a href="http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/">Off-the-Record Messaging</a>.</p>
32
-        </td>
33
-	<td class="beige">
34
-	  <div class="name">Andrew Lewman</div>
35
-	  <div class="caps">Secretary, Treasurer, and Executive Director</div>
36
-	  <p>Andrew is the Executive Director responsible for all
37
-	  operations of The Tor Project, Inc.  His other activities
38
-	  can be found at <a href="http://lewman.is">his website</a>.</p>
39
-	</td>
40
-    </tr>
41
-    <tr>
42
-	<td class="beige">
43
-	  <div class="name">Nick Mathewson</div>
44
-	  <div class="caps">Vice-President and Director</div>
45
-	  <p>Nick is one of the original developers of Tor.  He's the Chief Architect of The Tor Project, Inc.</p>
46
-	 </td>
47
-	 <td>
48
-        <div class="name">Rob Thomas</div>
49
-        <div class="caps">Director</div>
50
-          <p>Rob Thomas is CEO and founder of Team Cymru, and a
51
-          Cymru Fellow. You can learn more about Rob at the <a
52
-          href="http://www.team-cymru.org/">Team Cymru</a> websites.</p>
53
-        </td>
54
-      </tr>
55
-      <tr>
56
-	<td>
57
-          <div class="name">Frank Rieger</div>
58
-	  <div class="caps">Director</div>
59
-           <p>CTO of <a href="http://www.cryptophone.de/">GSMK Cryptophone</a>.</p>
60
-        </td>
61
-        <td class="beige">
62
-          <div class="name">Wendy Seltzer</div>
63
-	  <div class="caps">Director</div>
64
-           <p>Lawyer, cyberlaw professor, and founder of <a href="http://chillingeffects.org/">ChillingEffects.org</a>.</p>
65
-        </td>
66
-      </tr>
67
-      <tr>
68
-	<td class="beige">
69
-          <div class="name">Caspar Bowden</div>
70
-	  <div class="caps">Director</div>
71
-           <p>An independent advocate for information self-determination
72
-           rights, and public understanding of privacy research in
73
-           computer science. He is a specialist in data protection policy,
74
-           EU and US surveillance law, PET research, identity management,
75
-           and information ethics and philosophy.</p>
76
-        </td>
77
-      </tr>
78
-    </table>
79
-    <!-- END TABLE -->
80
-  </div>
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-  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
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-  <div id = "sidecol">
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-#include "side.wmi"
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-#include "info.wmi"
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-  </div>
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-  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
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-</div>
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-<!-- END CONTENT -->
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-#include <foot.wmi>
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-
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-## translation metadata
2
-# Revision: $Revision: 26251 $
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-# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
-
5
-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Contact" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
-
7
-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
8
-	<div id="breadcrumbs">
9
-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
10
-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
11
-    <a href="<page about/contact>">Contact</a>
12
-  </div>
13
-  <div id="maincol">
14
-    <h2>Tor: Contact</h2>
15
-    <ul>
16
-    <li><a href="#support">Support</a></li>
17
-    <li><a href="#email">Email</a></li>
18
-    <li><a href="#identica">Identi.ca</a></li>
19
-    <li><a href="#irc">IRC</a></li>
20
-    <li><a href="#sms">SMS/Text Messaging</a></li>
21
-    <li><a href="#phone">Telephone</a></li>
22
-    </ul>
23
-
24
-    <a id="support"></a>
25
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#support">Support</a></h3>
26
-
27
-     <p><i>help@rt.torproject.org</i> is the address to use for
28
-    questions about all things Tor, volunteering, and offering
29
-    resources. This is best effort service with no guarantees. We
30
-    generally respond within 48 hours. For support in other languages,
31
-    try:</p>
32
-
33
-    <ul>
34
-      <li><i>help-ar@rt.torproject.org</i> for Arabic</li>
35
-      <li><i>help-es@rt.torproject.org</i> for Spanish</li>
36
-      <li><i>help-fa@rt.torproject.org</i> for Farsi</li>
37
-      <li><i>help-fr@rt.torproject.org</i> for French</li>
38
-      <li><i>help-zh@rt.torproject.org</i> for Mandarin</li>
39
-    </ul>
40
-
41
-    <a id="email"></a>
42
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#email">Email</a></h3>
43
-    Please email <ew>help@rt.torproject.org</em> for general questions.
44
-
45
-    A few other addresses are more specific:
46
-
47
-    <ul>
48
-      <li><i>tor-talk@lists.torproject.org</i> is for all discussion
49
-      about theory, design, development, and use of Onion Routing.
50
-      <i>tor-dev@lists.torproject.org</i> is for Tor research and
51
-      development. For both of these <a href="<page
52
-      docs/documentation>#MailingLists">mailing lists</a>,
53
-      you must subscribe before you can post.</li>
54
-      <li><i>tor-translation@lists.torproject.org</i> can put new <a
55
-      href="<page getinvolved/translation>">translations</a> into place,
56
-      and help answer questions about existing and new translations.</li>
57
-      <li><i>donations@torproject.org</i> is for questions and comments about <a
58
-      href="<page donate/donate>">getting money to the developers</a>. More
59
-      donations means <a href="<page docs/faq>#Funding">more
60
-      Tor</a>. We're happy to help think about creative ways for you
61
-      to contribute.</li>
62
-      <li><i>execdir@torproject.org</i> is for press/media, questions and comments about
63
-      Tor the non-profit corporation: trademark questions, affiliation
64
-      and coordination, major gifts, contract inquiries, licensing and
65
-      certification, etc.</li>
66
-    </ul>
67
-
68
-    <a id="identica"></a>
69
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#identica">Identi.ca</a></h3>
70
-    <p>Contact us via our microblogging Identi.ca account <a
71
-    href="https://identi.ca/torproject">@torproject</a>.</p>
72
-
73
-    <a id="irc"></a>
74
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#irc">IRC</a></h3>
75
-    <p>Tor users and developers can also be found in the following channels on <a
76
-    href="http://www.oftc.net/oftc/">OFTC</a>:</p>
77
-
78
-    <ul>
79
-      <li><i>#tor</i> - User and relay operation discussions. Having trouble
80
-      running Tor or a question for other Tor users? Then this is the spot for
81
-      you.</li>
82
-      <li><i>#tor-dev</i> - Channel for people who want to do development.
83
-      Discussions about Tor-related coding, protocols, and <a href="<page
84
-      getinvolved/volunteer>">project ideas</a> are all welcome.</li>
85
-      <li><i>#nottor</i> - This is where Tor people hang out to talk about
86
-      stuff that is not related to Tor.</li>
87
-    </ul>
88
-
89
-    <a id="sms"></a>
90
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#sms">SMS/Text Messaging</a></h3>
91
-    <p>We've started an experimental SMS/Text Messaging contact
92
-    system. The following number can receive SMS/Text Messages from
93
-    anywhere: +15088010746. Please be aware that your phone company and
94
-    ours (and everyone in between) could see the messages.</p>
95
-
96
-    <a id="phone"></a>
97
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#phone">Telephone</a></h3>
98
-    <p>If none of the above appeal to you, calling +1-508-801-0746
99
-    will reach the Tor office. Should there be no answer, please
100
-    leave a message with a way to reach you. Please be aware that your
101
-    phone company and ours (and everyone in between) could listen to
102
-    the call. Please do not call for technical support, rather email
103
-    <em>help@rt.torproject.org</em>. Technical support calls are not
104
-    returned.</p>
105
-
106
-  </div>
107
-  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
108
-  <div id = "sidecol">
109
-#include "side.wmi"
110
-#include "info.wmi"
111
-  </div>
112
-  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
113
-</div>
114
-<!-- END CONTENT -->
115
-#include <foot.wmi>
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-## translation metadata
2
-# Revision: $Revision: 26001 $
3
-# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Past Contributors" CHARSET="UTF-8"
5
-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
6
-	<div id="breadcrumbs">
7
-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
8
-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page about/contributors>">Past Contributors</a>
10
-  </div>
11
-	<div id="maincol">
12
-  	<h1>Past Contributors</h1>
13
-<dl>
14
-<dt>Carolyn Anhalt</dt><dd>Coordinated translations and translators for
15
-all of tor's content; website, products, and materials.</dd>
16
-<dt>Thomas S. Benjamin</dt>
17
-<dd>Anonymous communications and bridge distribution
18
-researcher. His other work can be found on his <a
19
-href="http://cryptocracy.net/">personal website</a>.</dd>
20
-<dt>Domenik Bork</dt><dd> Worked on
21
-Configuration of Hidden Services with User Authorization in Vidalia as
22
-part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
23
-<dt>Benedikt Boss</dt><dd>Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of Code on <a
24
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/topf/trunk/README">TOPF</a>,
25
-a fuzzer for Tor; mentored by Roger.</dd>
26
-<dt>Ren Bucholz</dt><dd>Our fine logo and images.</dd>
27
-<dt>Fallon Chen</dt><dd> Worked on
28
-Improving Tor Path Selection (<a
29
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewvc.cgi/torflow/branches/gsoc2008/">svn</a>)
30
-and <a
31
-href="<specblob>proposals/151-path-selection-improvements.txt">proposal
32
-151</a> as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
33
-<dt>Bram Cohen</dt><dd>Helped design our congestion control mechanisms,
34
-in Tor's early days.</dd>
35
-<dt>Pat Double</dt><dd>Creator of the Incognito LiveCD.</dd>
36
-<dt>Christopher Davis, Libevent hacker</dt>
37
-<dd>Worked during Google Summer of Code 2009 on porting
38
-Polipo to Windows.  He currently helps with the libevent
39
-bufferevent code.</dd>
40
-<dt>Matt Edman</dt>
41
-<dd>Original developer for <a href="<page projects/vidalia>">Vidalia</a>,
42
-a cross-platform Tor Graphical User Interface included in the bundles.</dd>
43
-<dt>Geoff Goodell</dt><dd>Started the <a
44
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/blossom/trunk/">Blossom project</a>
45
-which uses Tor as its overlay network; also helped motivate Tor's control
46
-interface to be as flexible as it is.</dd>
47
-<dt>Aleksei Gorny</dt><dd> Working on
48
-Tor exit scanner improvements (<a
49
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewvc.cgi/torflow/branches/gsoc2008/">svn</a>), originally started as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
50
-<dt>Justin Hipple</dt><dd>The other developer for Vidalia.</dd>
51
-<dt>Robert Hogan</dt>
52
-<dd>Developer for the <a
53
-href="http://tork.sf.net/">TorK</a> Tor controller, a <a
54
-href="http://code.google.com/p/torora/">privacy-oriented
55
-Arora fork</a>, the <a
56
-href="http://code.google.com/p/torsocks/">torsocks
57
-scripts</a>, and other useful peripheral tools.</dd>
58
-<dt>Christian King</dt><dd> Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of Code
59
-on making Tor relays stable on
60
-Windows, by developing a <a
61
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/libevent-urz/trunk/README">buffer
62
-implementation for libevent</a>; mentored by Nick.</dd>
63
-<dt>Joe Kowalski</dt><dd>Original author and provider of the torstatus
64
-script formerly run on nighteffect.</dd>
65
-<dt>Adam Langley</dt><dd>Our fine eventdns code.</dd>
66
-<dt>Bruce Leidl</dt><dd>Worked on a Tor client in Java.</dd>
67
-<dt>Rebecca MacKinnon</dt><dd>Former Director of Tor.  Co-Founder of <a
68
-href="http://www.globalvoicesonline.org/">Global Voices Online</a>.</dd>
69
-<dt>Chris Palmer</dt><dd>Our liaison and tech guy with EFF while EFF
70
-was funding us. Also helped advocate and write end-user docs.</dd>
71
-<dt>Martin Peck</dt><dd>Worked on a VM-based transparent
72
-proxying approach for Tor clients on Windows.</dd>
73
-<dt>Matej Pfajfar</dt><dd>Author of the original onion routing code that
74
-Tor is based on, so we didn't have to start from scratch.</dd>
75
-<dt>Robert Ransom</dt><dd>Found and fixed a bunch of Tor bugs, mostly in
76
-Tor's hidden service code, and added several security and usability
77
-features to Tor and Tor Browser Bundle.</dd>
78
-<dt>Johannes Renner</dt><dd> Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of
79
-Code on modifying <a
80
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/torflow/trunk/README">TorFlow</a>
81
-to measure various properties of the Tor network; mentored by Mike
82
-Perry.</dd>
83
-<dt>Scott Squires</dt><dd>The original developer of <a
84
-href="<page torbutton/index>">Torbutton</a>.</dd>
85
-<dt>tup (a pseudonym)</dt><dd>Added new features for
86
-making Tor easier to use as a <a
87
-href="<wiki>TransparentProxy">transparent
88
-proxy</a>. Also wrote the <a
89
-href="http://p56soo2ibjkx23xo.onion/">TorDNSEL code</a>.</dd>
90
-<dt>Stephen Tyree</dt><dd> Worked during Google Summer of Code 2009 to
91
-develop a plugin API for <a href="<page projects/vidalia>">Vidalia</a>
92
-and create a plugin to allow HerdictWeb integration, a project aiming
93
-at identifying website inaccessibility using user submissions.</dd>
94
-<dt>Camilo Viecco</dt><dd> Worked on
95
-Providing Blossom functionality to Vidalia (<a
96
-href="http://trac.vidalia-project.net/browser/vidalia/branches/exit-country">svn</a>) as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
97
-<dt>Fred von Lohmann</dt><dd>Fred served on our Board of Directors
98
-from 2006 through 2009.</dd>
99
-<dt>Kyle Williams</dt><dd>Developer for JanusVM, a VMWare-based
100
-transparent Tor proxy that makes Tor easier to set up and use.</dd>
101
-<dt>Christian Wilms</dt><dd> Worked on
102
-Performance Enhancing Measures for Tor Hidden Services (<a
103
-href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewvs.cgi/tor/branches/hidserv-perf/">svn</a>) as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
104
-<dt>Jillian C. York</dt><dd><a href="http://jilliancyork.com/">Jillian C. York</a> is a writer, blogger, and activist based in Boston.</dd>
105
-</dl>
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-
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-## translation metadata
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-# Revision: $Revision: 26252 $
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-# Translation-Priority: 3-low
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-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Core People" CHARSET="UTF-8"
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-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
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-	<div id="breadcrumbs">
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-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
8
-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page about/corepeople>">Tor People</a>
10
-</div>
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-<div id="maincol">
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-    <p>The Tor Project is a 501(c)(3) non-profit based in
13
-    the United States. The official address of the organization is:
14
-    </p>
15
-
16
-    <address>
17
-    The Tor Project<br>
18
-    969 Main Street, Suite 206<br>
19
-    Walpole, MA 02081-2972 USA<br><br>
20
-    </address>
21
-
22
-    <p>The organization consists of many volunteers and a few employees.
23
-    Please don't contact us individually about Tor topics &mdash; if you
24
-    have a problem or question, please look through the <a href="<page
25
-    about/contact>">contact page</a> for appropriate addresses.</p>
26
-
27
-  	<h1>Core Tor People</h1>
28
-<dl>
29
-          <dt>Alexandre Allaire, Developer</dt>
30
-          <dd>Helps develop Flash Proxy.</dd>
31
-          <dt>Jacob Appelbaum, Advocate, Security Researcher, and Developer</dt>
32
-          <dd>Our main advocate.  Speaks at conferences and gives
33
-          trainings all over the world to get people excited about Tor,
34
-          explain how Tor is used in real world situations, and generally
35
-          explain why anonymity online matters to you.  Original developer
36
-          of ttdnsd, <a href="https://check.torproject.org/">Tor
37
-          check</a>, <a href="https://exitlist.torproject.org/">Tor
38
-          DNSEL</a>, and <a href="https://weather.torproject.org">Tor
39
-          weather</a> site.</dd>
40
-          <dt>Erinn Clark, Packaging and Build Automation</dt>
41
-          <dd>Erinn is tackling the growing needs for easy to install
42
-          and configure packages on a variety of operating systems.
43
-          Also working on automating the build system and producing
44
-          nightly builds for all operating systems we support. Erinn is
45
-          also doing some advocacy by talking to audiences at FSCONS,
46
-          CodeBits.eu, and various European universites.</dd>
47
-          <dt>Roger Dingledine, Project Leader, Director, Researcher</dt>
48
-          <dd>Original developer of Tor along with Nick Mathewson and Paul
49
-          Syverson. Leading researcher in the anonymous communications
50
-          field.  Frequent speaker at conferences to advocate Tor and
51
-          explain what Tor is and can do. Helps coordinate academic
52
-          researchers.</dd>
53
-          <dt>David Fifield, Developer</dt>
54
-          <dd>Developer and co-inventor of <a
55
-          href="https://crypto.stanford.edu/flashproxy/">Flash Proxy</a> (<a
56
-          href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/flashproxy.git">git</a>),
57
-          a set of tools to route Tor traffic via web browsers for
58
-          better blocking-resistance.</dd>
59
-          <dt>Arturo Filastò, Developer</dt>
60
-          <dd>Develops censorship measurement tools, and generally helps
61
-          to evaluate security.</dd>
62
-          <dt>Nathan Freitas, Mobile phone hacker</dt>
63
-          <dd>The driving force behind <a
64
-          href="https://guardianproject.info">The Guardian
65
-          Project</a> and Tor on the Android platform in the form of
66
-          <a href="<page docs/android>">Orbot</a>. He also works on <a
67
-          href="https://guardianproject.info/apps/orlib/">OrLib</a>:
68
-          an Android library for Tor, and <a
69
-          href="https://guardianproject.info/apps/orweb/">Orweb: A
70
-          privacy-enhanced mobile browser</a>.</dd>
71
-          <dt>Christian Fromme, Developer</dt>
72
-          <dd>Christian works on all things python for Tor.  He enhanced
73
-          and maintains a slew of codebases for us, such as the get-tor
74
-          email auto-responder, check.torproject.org, bridge db, tor
75
-          weather, tor controller, tor flow, etc.</dd>
76
-          <dt>Aaron Gibson, Developer</dt>
77
-          <dd>Taking over bridgedb development, and hopefully development
78
-          and maintenance for other Tor services.</dd>
79
-          <dt>Melissa Gilroy, CFO and Internal Audit</dt>
80
-          <dd>With a strong background in non-profit accounting and
81
-          auditing, Melissa is in charge of Tor's finances, audit
82
-          compliance, and keeping Tor's financial operations moving
83
-          along.</dd>
84
-          <dt>Dr. Ian Goldberg, Director, Researcher</dt>
85
-          <dd>Cryptographer, privacy expert,
86
-          and professor; one of the designers of <a
87
-          href="http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/">Off-the-Record
88
-          Messaging</a>.</dd>
89
-          <dt>Sathyanarayanan Gunasekaran, Developer</dt>
90
-          <dd>Developer that worked on Orbot in Google
91
-          Summer of Code 2011, and presently develops Compass and
92
-          Pyonionoo</dd>
93
-          <dt>Sebastian Hahn, Developer and Advocate</dt>
94
-          <dd>Improves build and testing automation for TBB. Develops
95
-          Tor itself. Helps people around the world use and understand
96
-          Tor better. Generally helps everything run smoothly.</dd>
97
-          <dt>Rob Jansen, Researcher</dt>
98
-          <dd>Developer for <a href="https://shadow.cs.umn.edu/">Shadow</a>,
99
-          a full Tor network simulator that he's using to help us understand
100
-          and improve Tor network performance.</dd>
101
-          <dt>Damian Johnson, Developer</dt>
102
-          <dd>Author of <a href="http://www.atagar.com/arm/">arm</a>, a command-line
103
-          application that provides real-time status information for Tor relays
104
-          and <a href="https://stem.torproject.org/">Stem</a>, a controller
105
-          library for interacting with Tor.</dd>
106
-          <dt>George Kadianakis, Developer</dt>
107
-          <dd>Developer of pluggable transports and bridge-scanning
108
-          resistance.</dd>
109
-          <dt>Andrew Lewman, Executive Director, Director,
110
-          <a href="<page press/press>">press contact</a></dt>
111
-          <dd>Manages the business operations of The Tor Project, Inc.
112
-          Plays roles of finance, advocacy, project management, strategy,
113
-          press, and general support. He can be contacted via OpenPGP 0x6B4D6475 or 508-801-0746.</dd>
114
-          <dt>Dr. Karsten Loesing, Metrics Researcher and Developer,
115
-          Project Manager</dt>
116
-          <dd>Primary researcher and developer into
117
-          <a href="https://metrics.torproject.org/">anonymous metrics</a>
118
-          which started as a National Science Foundation grant. Also helps
119
-          coordinate work for our various
120
-          <a href="<wiki>org/sponsors">sponsor projects</a>.</dd>
121
-          <dt>Nick Mathewson, Chief Architect, Researcher, Director</dt>
122
-          <dd>One of the three original designers of Tor; does a lot
123
-          of the ongoing design work. One of the two main developers,
124
-          along with Roger.</dd>
125
-          <dt>Dr. Steven Murdoch, Researcher and Developer</dt>
126
-          <dd>Researcher at the University of Cambridge, currently funded
127
-          by The Tor Project to improve the security, performance,
128
-          and usability of Tor. Creator of the <a href="<page
129
-          projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser Bundle</a>.
130
-          You can find out more about his work on his <a
131
-          href="http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~sjm217/">professional
132
-          website</a></dd>
133
-          <dt>Linus Nordberg, Advocate, Developer</dt>
134
-          <dd>Swedish advocate for Tor, anonymous
135
-          communications research, and employee at <a
136
-          href="http://nordu.net">NORDUnet</a>. Works on implementing
137
-          IPv6 in Tor.</dd>
138
-          <dt>Peter Palfrader, Sysadmin and Developer</dt>
139
-          <dd>Manages the Debian packages, runs one of the directory
140
-          authorities, runs the website and the wiki, and generally helps
141
-          out a lot.</dd>
142
-          <dt>Mike Perry, Torbutton and Tor Performance Developer</dt>
143
-          <dd>Author of <a
144
-          href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/torflow/trunk/README">TorFlow</a>,
145
-          a Tor controller that builds paths through the
146
-          Tor network and measures various properties and
147
-          behaviors. Developer and maintainer of <a href="<page
148
-          torbutton/index>">Torbutton</a>.</dd>
149
-          <dt>Karen Reilly, Development Director</dt>
150
-          <dd>Responsible for fundraising, advocacy, general marketing,
151
-          policy outreach programs for Tor. She is also available to
152
-          speak for audiences about the benefits of online anonymity,
153
-          privacy, and Tor.</dd>
154
-          <dt>Runa A. Sandvik, Developer, Security Researcher, and Translation Coordinator</dt>
155
-          <dd>Maintains the <a
156
-          href="http://www.transifex.net/projects/p/torproject/">Tor
157
-          Translation Portal</a> and the translations for a number of
158
-          projects (such as Vidalia, Torbutton and the website). She
159
-          also generally helps out with the <a
160
-          href="<wiki>doc/Torouter">Torouter
161
-          project</a>, bridge distribution through instant messaging,
162
-          and other projects.</dd>
163
-          <dt>Wendy Seltzer, Director</dt>
164
-          <dd>Lawyer, cyberlaw professor, and founder of <a
165
-          href="http://chillingeffects.org/">ChillingEffects.org</a>.</dd>
166
-          <dt>Andrea Shepard, Developer</dt>
167
-          <dd>Works with Nick as a core Tor developer.</dd>
168
-          <dt>Sukhbir Singh, Developer</dt>
169
-          <dd>Develops and maintains TorBirdy (Torbutton for Thunderbird).</dd>
170
-          <dt>Dr. Paul Syverson, Researcher</dt>
171
-          <dd>Inventor of <a href="http://www.onion-router.net/">Onion
172
-          Routing</a>, original designer of Tor along with Roger and
173
-          Nick, and project leader for original design, development,
174
-          and deployment of Tor. Currently helps out with research
175
-          and design.</dd>
176
-          <dt>Jeremy Todaro, Illustration &amp; Design</dt>
177
-          <dd>Works on the artwork and design for various projects,
178
-          annual reports, and brochures. His other work can be found at
179
-          <a href="http://jmtodaro.com/">http://jmtodaro.com/</a>.</dd>
180
-          <dt>Tomás Touceda, Vidalia Developer</dt>
181
-          <dd>Maintenance and new development for Vidalia.</dd>
182
-          <dt>Shondoit Walker, Build Developer</dt>
183
-          <dd>Works on streamlining and bulletproofing the Tor Browser
184
-          Bundle build process, especially on Windows.</dd>
185
-          <dt>Philipp Winter, Researcher</dt>
186
-          <dd>Understands how to manipulate and circumvent Tor network
187
-          censorship attempts.</dd>
188
-
189
-</dl>
190
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-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
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-	<div id="breadcrumbs">
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-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
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-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
11
-    <a href="<page about/financials>">Financials</a>
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-  </div>
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-  <div id="maincol">
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-    <h1>Tor: Financial Reports</h1>
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-      <dl>
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-        <dt>Fiscal Year 2012</dt>
17
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2012-TorProject-Annual-Report.pdf">2012
18
-        Annual Report</a></dd>
19
-	<dd><a href="findoc/2012-TorProject-Form990.pdf">2012 IRS Form 990</a></dd>
20
-	<dd><a href="findoc/2012-TorProject-FormPC.pdf">2012 State of MA Form PC</a></dd>
21
-	<dd><a href="findoc/2012-TorProject-FinancialStatements.pdf">2012 Financial Statements</a></dd>
22
-        <dt>Fiscal Year 2011</dt>
23
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2011-TorProject-Amended-Final-Report.pdf">2011
24
-        Financial Statements and Audit Report</a></dd>
25
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2011-TorProject-DCF.pdf">2011 Dept of Commerce
26
-        Data Collection Form</a></dd>
27
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2011-TorProject-Form990.pdf">2011 IRS Form
28
-        990</a></dd>
29
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2011-TorProject-FormPC.pdf">2011 State of
30
-        MA Form PC</a></dd>
31
-        <dt>Fiscal Year 2010</dt>
32
-        <dd><a
33
-        href="findoc/2010-TorProject-combined-Form990_PC_Audit_Results.pdf">2010
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-        IRS Form 990, State of MA Form PC, and Independent Audit
35
-        Results</a></dd>
36
-        <dt>Fiscal Year 2009</dt>
37
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2009-TorProject-Annual-Report.pdf">2009
38
-        Annual Report</a></dd>
39
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2009-TorProject-Form990andPC.pdf">2009 IRS
40
-        Form 990 and State of MA Form PC</a></dd>
41
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2009-TorProject-FinancialStatements.pdf">2009
42
-        Financial Statements and Audit results</a></dd>
43
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2009-TorProject-DCF.pdf">2009 Dept of Commerce
44
-        Data Collection Form</a></dd>
45
-        <dt>Fiscal Year 2008</dt>
46
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2008-TorProject-Form990.pdf">2008 IRS Form
47
-        990</a></dd>
48
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2008-TorProject-FinancialStatements.pdf">2008
49
-        Financial Statements and Audit Results</a></dd>
50
-        <dt>Fiscal Year 2007</dt>
51
-        <dd><a href="findoc/2007-TorProject-Form990.pdf">2007 IRS Form
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-        990</a></dd>
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-      </dl>
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-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor: Google Summer of Code 2013" CHARSET="UTF-8"
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-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
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-  <div id="breadcrumbs">
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-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page about/gsoc>">Google Summer of Code</a>
10
-  </div>
11
-  <div id="maincol"> 
12
-    <h2>Tor: Google Summer of Code 2013</h2>
13
-    <hr>
14
-    
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-    <p>
16
-    The Tor Project, in collaboration with <a href="https://www.eff.org/">The
17
-    Electronic Frontier Foundation</a>, have taken part in Google Summer of Code
18
-    for 2007 through 2012, mentoring the total of 33 students. Now google has
19
-    announced that we'll be taking part again for <a
20
-    href="https://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/homepage/google/gsoc2013">Google
21
-    Summer of Code 2013</a>!
22
-    </p>
23
-    
24
-    <p>
25
-    You must be self-motivated and able to work independently. We have
26
-    a thriving community of interested developers on the IRC channel and
27
-    mailing lists, and we're eager to work with you, brainstorm about design,
28
-    and so on, but you need to be able to manage your own time, and you
29
-    need to already be somewhat familiar with how free software development on the
30
-    Internet works.
31
-    </p>
32
-    
33
-    <p>
34
-    Working on Tor is rewarding because:
35
-    </p>
36
-    
37
-    <ul>
38
-    <li>You can work your own hours in your own locations. As long as you
39
-    get the job done, we don't care about the process.</li>
40
-    <li>We only write free (open source) software. The tools you make won't
41
-    be locked down or rot on a shelf.</li>
42
-    <li>You will work with a world-class team of anonymity experts and
43
-    developers on what is already the largest and most active strong anonymity
44
-    network ever.</li>
45
-    <li>The work you do could contribute to academic publications &mdash;
46
-    Tor development raises many open questions and interesting problems
47
-    in the field of <a href="http://freehaven.net/anonbib/">anonymity
48
-    systems</a>.</li>
49
-    </ul>
50
-    
51
-    <a id="GettingInvolved"></a>
52
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#GettingInvolved">How To Get Involved</a></h2>
53
-    
54
-    <p>
55
-    The best way to get involved is to come <a href="<page
56
-    about/contact>#irc">listen on IRC</a> (both "#tor" and "#tor-dev"), read
57
-    our docs and other webpages, try out the various tools that are related to
58
-    the projects that interest you, and ask questions as they come to you: <a
59
-    href="<page docs/documentation>#UpToSpeed">Getting up to speed</a>.
60
-    </p>
61
-    
62
-    <p>
63
-    In addition to getting some more development work
64
-    done on Tor and related applications, Google and Tor are most interested
65
-    in getting students involved in Tor development in a way that keeps them
66
-    involved after the summer too. That means we will give priority to students
67
-    who have demonstrated continued interest and responsiveness. We will require
68
-    students to write public status report updates for our community, either by
69
-    blogging or sending mail to our mailing list. We want to ensure that the
70
-    community and the student can both benefit from each other.
71
-    </p>
72
-    
73
-    <p>
74
-    When it comes time for us to choose projects, our impression of how well
75
-    you'll fit into our community &mdash; and how well you are at taking
76
-    the initiative to do things &mdash; will be at least as important as
77
-    the actual project you'll be working on.
78
-    </p>
79
-    
80
-    <a id="Ideas"></a>
81
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Ideas">Ideas List</a></h2>
82
-    
83
-    <p>
84
-    To start with, please see Tor's <b><a href="<page
85
-    getinvolved/volunteer>#Projects">projects page</a></b> and its following
86
-    ideas.
87
-    </p>
88
-    
89
-    <p>
90
-    The best kind of ideas are well defined and easily broken into subtasks. 
91
-    A lot of students try to bite off open-ended development and research
92
-    topics. But if you're going to spend the first half of your summer figuring
93
-    out what exactly you should code, there's a chance that the conclusion will
94
-    be "oh, that isn't actually feasible to build after all" and your proposal
95
-    will make us very nervous.
96
-    </p>
97
-    
98
-    <p>
99
-    Try to figure out how much you can actually fit in a summer, break the work
100
-    down into manageable pieces, and most importantly, figure out how to make
101
-    sure your incremental milestones are actually useful &mdash; if you don't
102
-    finish everything in your plan, we want to know that you'll still have
103
-    produced something useful.
104
-    </p>
105
-    
106
-    <a id="Template"></a>
107
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Template">Application Template</a></h2>
108
-    
109
-    <p>
110
-    Please use the following template for your application, to make sure you
111
-    provide enough information for us to evaluate you and your proposal.
112
-    </p>
113
-    
114
-    <ol>
115
-    
116
-    <li>What project would you like to work on? Use our ideas lists as a starting
117
-    point or make up your own idea. Your proposal should include high-level
118
-    descriptions of what you're going to do, with more details about the
119
-    parts you expect to be tricky. Your proposal should also try to break
120
-    down the project into tasks of a fairly fine granularity, and convince
121
-    us you have a plan for finishing it. A timeline for what you will be doing
122
-    throughout the summer is highly recommended.<br /><br />
123
-
124
-    <i>Note that we might share which project ideas have strong applications in
125
-    order to spread applicants out (it's bad for everyone for several strong
126
-    applicants to be for the exact same project).</i><br /><br /></li>
127
-    
128
-    <li>Point us to a code sample: something good and clean to demonstrate
129
-    that you know what you're doing, ideally from an existing project.</li>
130
-    
131
-    <li>Why do you want to work with The Tor Project in
132
-    particular?</li>
133
-    
134
-    <li>Tell us about your experiences in free software development
135
-    environments. We especially want to hear examples of how you have
136
-    collaborated with others rather than just working on a project by
137
-    yourself.</li>
138
-    
139
-    <li>Will you be working full-time on the project for the summer, or will
140
-    you have other commitments too (a second job, classes, etc)? If you won't
141
-    be available full-time, please explain, and list timing if you know them
142
-    for other major deadlines (e.g. exams). Having other activities isn't
143
-    a deal-breaker, but we don't want to be surprised.</li>
144
-    
145
-    <li>Will your project need more work and/or maintenance after the summer
146
-    ends? What are the chances you will stick around and help out with that
147
-    and other related projects?</li>
148
-    
149
-    <li>What is your ideal approach to keeping everybody informed of your
150
-    progress, problems, and questions over the course of the project? Said
151
-    another way, how much of a "manager" will you need your mentor to be?</li>
152
-    
153
-    <li>What school are you attending? What year are you, and what's your
154
-    major/degree/focus? If you're part of a research group, which one?</li>
155
-    
156
-    <li>How can we contact you to ask you further questions? Google doesn't
157
-    share your contact details with us automatically, so you should include
158
-    that in your application. In addition, what's your IRC nickname?
159
-    Interacting with us on IRC will help us get to know you, and help you
160
-    get to know our community.</li>
161
-    
162
-    <li>Are you applying to other projects for GSoC and, if so, what would be
163
-    your preference if you're accepted to both? Having a stated preference
164
-    helps with the deduplication process and will not impact if we accept your
165
-    application or not.</li>
166
-    
167
-    <li>Is there anything else that we should know that will make us like your
168
-    project more?</li>
169
-    
170
-    </ol>
171
-    
172
-    <p>
173
-    We mostly pick mentors from the <a href="<page about/corepeople>">core Tor
174
-    development team</a> so we should be able to accommodate a wide variety of
175
-    projects. These can range from work on Tor itself to work on supporting or
176
-    peripheral projects.
177
-    </p>
178
-    
179
-    <p>
180
-    All selected projects are assigned both a primary and assistant mentor to
181
-    answer your questions and help you integrate with the broader Tor
182
-    community. Though your mentors are a primary point of contact please use
183
-    our public spaces (the <a href="<page about/contact>#irc">#tor-dev irc
184
-    channel</a> and <a href="<page docs/documentation>#MailingLists">tor-dev@
185
-    email list</a>) to discuss your project. We want you to become a part of
186
-    the community by the end of the summer, not a stranger that's only known by
187
-    your mentor.
188
-    </p>
189
-    
190
-    <p>
191
-    If you're interested, you can either contact the <a href="<page
192
-    about/contact>">tor-assistants list</a> (a private list) with a brief
193
-    summary of your proposal and we'll give you feedback, or just jump right in
194
-    and post your ideas and goals to the <a href="<page
195
-    docs/documentation>#MailingLists">tor-dev mailing list</a> (which is open).
196
-    Make sure to be responsive during the application selection period; if we
197
-    like your application but you never answer our mails asking for more
198
-    information, that's not a good sign.
199
-    </p>
200
-    
201
-    <p>
202
-    We're always happy to have new contributors so if you haven't filled up
203
-    your summer plans yet, please consider spending some time working with us
204
-    to make Tor better!
205
-    </p>
206
-    
207
-    <a id="Example"></a>
208
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Example">Application Examples</a></h2>
209
-    
210
-    <p>
211
-    Below are examples of some GSoC applications from previous years we liked.
212
-    The best applications tend to go through several iterations so you're
213
-    highly encouraged to send drafts early.
214
-    </p>
215
-    
216
-    <ul>
217
-      <li><h4><a href="http://kostas.mkj.lt/gsoc2013/gsoc2013.html">Searchable Tor descriptor archive</a> by Kostas Jakeliunas</h4></li>
218
-      <li><h4><a href="https://www.google-melange.com/gsoc/proposal/review/google/gsoc2013/weltraumpfleger/1">Create an Internet Censorship Virtual Machine Based Simulator</a> by Johannes Fürmann</h4></li>
219
-      <li><h4><a href="../about/gsocProposal/gsoc12-proposal-stemImprovements.html">Stem Improvements and Arm port</a> by Ravi Padmala</h4></li>
220
-      <li><h4><a href="http://feroze.in/gsoc12.html">Implementing Hidden Service Configuration and Bandwidth Scheduling Plugins</a> by Feroze Naina</h4></li>
221
-      <li><h4><a href="../about/gsocProposal/gsoc10-proposal-soat.txt">SOAT Expansion</a> by John Schanck</h4></li>
222
-      <li><h4><a href="http://inspirated.com/uploads/tor-gsoc-11.pdf">GTK+ Frontend and Client Mode Improvements for arm</a> by Kamran Khan</h4></li>
223
-      <li><h4><a href="http://www.gsathya.in/gsoc11.html">Orbot + ORLib</a> by Sathya Gunasekaran</h4></li>
224
-      <li><h4><a href="http://blanu.net/TorSummerOfCodeProposal.pdf">Blocking-resistant Transport Evaluation Framework</a> by Brandon Wiley</h4></li>
225
-      <li><h4><a href="../about/gsocProposal/gsoc11-proposal-metadataToolkit.pdf">Metadata Anonymisation Toolkit</a> by Julien Voisin</h4></li>
226
-      <li><h4><a href="http://www.atagar.com/misc/gsocBlog09/">Website Pootle Translation</a> by Damian Johnson</h4></li>
227
-    </ul>
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-    
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-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
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-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
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-    <a href="<page about/jobs>">Jobs</a>
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-  </div>
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-	<div id="maincol">
13
-<h1>The Tor Project is looking for a Browser Hacker!</h1>
14
-<h1>Note: we've filled this position for now, but we hope to be looking
15
-for another core developer in the future.</h1>
16
-
17
-<p>
18
-Your job would be to work on Torbutton and patches to our
19
-Firefox-based browser, as well as a potential Android port. This would
20
-be a contractor position likely starting in October and going through
21
-Q1 2013, with the possibility of later in 2013 and beyond. There may
22
-also be a possibility for part-time work prior to October.
23
-</p>
24
-
25
-<p>
26
-All candidates must:
27
-</p>
28
-
29
-<ul>
30
-
31
-<li>Have experience in C++ and ideally Javascript. At least 5 years
32
-experience is probably necessary for the level of expertise we want,
33
-though some of these years can be replaced with other Object Oriented
34
-Programming and/or C experience. If you meet this level of experience
35
-with C++/OOP, Javascript can be learned on the job.</li>
36
-
37
-<li>Have a solid understanding of issues surrounding secure C++
38
-programming (at least to the level of avoiding them).</li>
39
-
40
-<li>Be comfortable and experienced with repeatedly diving into new,
41
-unfamiliar codebases, looking for ways to alter and augment their
42
-functionality in specific, goal-oriented ways.</li>
43
-
44
-<li>Be at least passingly familiar with web technologies and how the
45
-web works, especially the same-origin model and web tracking.</li>
46
-
47
-<li>Be comfortable and experienced justifying and documenting technical
48
-decisions for a public, world-wide technical audience.</li>
49
-
50
-<li>Be comfortable working remotely.</li>
51
-
52
-<li>Be comfortable and experienced with interacting with users and other
53
-developers online. Have thick enough skin to survive occasional trolling
54
-from either group.</li>
55
-
56
-<li>Be comfortable with transparency: as a non-profit, everything we do is in
57
-public, including your name (or at least your business name) and pay
58
-rate.</li>
59
-
60
-</ul>
61
-
62
-<p>
63
-An ideal candidate would also:
64
-</p>
65
-
66
-<ul>
67
-
68
-<li>Already be familiar with writing addons for Mozilla Firefox or other
69
-web browsers.</li>
70
-
71
-<li>Already be familiar with writing patches for Mozilla Firefox or
72
-other web browsers.</li>
73
-
74
-<li>Already be familiar with compiling software for the Android
75
-platform.</li>
76
-
77
-<li>Be capable of insanely creative yet also ruthlessly pragmatic
78
-thinking.</li>
79
-
80
-<li>Be familiar with probability, statistics, and information theory.</li>
81
-
82
-<li>Know enough about networking to be able to visualize what HTTP
83
-1.1 looks like on the wire while encapsulated within Tor's network
84
-protocol.</li>
85
-
86
-<li>Have experience with open-source software development, including
87
-working with distributed teams across different time-zones containing
88
-employees and volunteers of differing skill levels over multiple mediums,
89
-including email, instant messaging, and IRC.</li>
90
-
91
-<li>Have basic familiarity with distributed version control systems.</li>
92
-
93
-<li>Have contributed significant chunks of code to multiple open-source
94
-projects in the past.</li>
95
-
96
-<li>Genuinely be excited about Tor and our values.</li>
97
-</ul>
98
-
99
-<p>
100
-Detailed job description:
101
-</p>
102
-
103
-<blockquote>
104
-
105
-<p>
106
-Being a Tor Browser Hacker includes triaging, diagnosing, and fixing
107
-bugs; looking for and resolving web privacy issues; responding on short
108
-notice to security issues; and working collaboratively with coworkers
109
-and volunteers on implementing new features and web behavior changes.
110
-</p>
111
-
112
-<p>
113
-We'd also need help making our code more maintainable, testable,
114
-and mergeable by upstream. Sometimes, we need to drop everything and
115
-scramble to implement last-minute fixes, or to deploy urgent security
116
-updates. You'd also be reviewing other people's code, designs, and
117
-academic research papers, and looking for ways to improve upon them.
118
-</p>
119
-
120
-<p>
121
-For an even more detailed overview of the full breadth
122
-and depth of the work you'd be doing, have a look at <a
123
-href="https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser/design/">The
124
-Design and Implementation of the Tor Browser</a>, especially <a
125
-href="https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser/design/#DesignRequirements">The
126
-Design Requirements</a> section.
127
-</p>
128
-
129
-</blockquote>
130
-
131
-<p>
132
-Other notes:
133
-</p>
134
-
135
-<ul>
136
-	<li>Tor developers don't have an office; you can work from
137
-	wherever you want, in basically any country. You'll need to be
138
-	comfortable in this environment! We coordinate via IRC, email,
139
-	and bug trackers.</li>
140
-	<li>Academic degrees are great, but not required if you have
141
-	the right experience.</li>
142
-	<li>We only write free and open source software, and we don't
143
-	believe in software patents.</li>
144
-</ul>
145
-
146
-<p>
147
-How to apply:
148
-</p>
149
-
150
-<ul>
151
-	<li>Link to a sample of code you've written in the past that
152
-	you're allowed to show us.</li>
153
-	<li>Provide a CV explaining your background, experience, skills,
154
-	and other relevant qualifications.</li>
155
-	<li>List some people who can tell us more about you: these
156
-	references could be employers or coworkers, open source projects,
157
-	etc.</li>
158
-	<li>Email the above to jobs at torproject.org, specifying the
159
-	"Browser Hacker" position.</li>
160
-</ul>
161
-
162
-<p>
163
-About the company:<br>
164
- The Tor Project is a US 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to research,
165
- development, and education about online anonymity and privacy. The Tor
166
- network's 3000 volunteer relays carry 16 Gbps for upwards of half a
167
- million daily users, including ordinary citizens who want protection
168
- from identity theft and prying corporations, corporations who want
169
- to look at a competitor's website in private, people around the world
170
- whose Internet connections are censored, and even governments and law
171
- enforcement. Tor has a staff of 14 paid developers, researchers, and
172
- advocates, plus many dozen volunteers who help out on a daily basis. Tor
173
- is funded in part by government research and development grants, and
174
- in part by individual and corporate donations.
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-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
10
-    <a href="<page about/jobs>">Jobs</a>
11
-  </div>
12
-	<div id="maincol">
13
-<h1>The Tor Project is looking for another dedicated core developer!</h1>
14
-<h1>Note: we've filled this position for now, but we hope to be looking
15
-for another core developer in the future.</h1>
16
-
17
-<p>
18
-Your job would be to work on all aspects of the main Tor network daemon
19
-and other open-source software.
20
-
21
-This would be a contractor position starting in 2013 (with plenty of
22
-work to keep you busy), with the possibility of 2014 and beyond.
23
-</p>
24
-
25
-<p>
26
-Any candidate must:
27
-</p>
28
-
29
-<ul>
30
-	<li>Have extensive experience in C, and several other programming
31
-	languages. At least 5 years experience with C is probably
32
-	necessary for the level of expertise we want; most people would
33
-	need more.</li>
34
-	<li>Have a solid understanding of issues surrounding secure
35
-	C programming.</li>
36
-	<li>Be comfortable working remotely.</li>
37
-	<li>Be familiar and experienced with nonblocking, event-driven
38
-	networking programs.</li>
39
-	<li>Be comfortable and experienced with interacting with users online.</li>
40
-	<li>Be comfortable and experienced with driving the entire
41
-	lifecycle of a new feature in an existing piece of software,
42
-	from design to implementation to testing.</li>
43
-	<li>Be comfortable and experienced getting code and design
44
-	reviewed, and reviewing the code and design of others.</li>
45
-	<li>Be comfortable with transparency: as a non-profit, everything
46
-	we do is in public, including your name and pay rate.</li>
47
-</ul>
48
-
49
-<p>
50
-An ideal candidate would also:
51
-</p>
52
-
53
-<ul>
54
-	<li>Know enough of the basics of cryptography in order to
55
-	understand how to implement our protocols and discuss changes
56
-	to them. (Actually implementing block ciphers and stuff like
57
-	that isn't necessary.)</li>
58
-	<li>Know enough about networking in order to understand how to
59
-	implement our protocols and discuss changes to them.</li>
60
-	<li>Have experience with high-performance networking code.</li>
61
-	<li>Have experience with open-source software development,
62
-	including working with distributed teams across different
63
-	time-zones containing employees and volunteers of differing
64
-	skill levels over email and IRC.</li>
65
-	<li>Have basic familiarity with distributed version control
66
-	systems.</li>
67
-	<li>Have contributed significant chunks of code to multiple
68
-	open-source projects in the past.</li>
69
-	<li>Genuinely be excited about Tor and our values.</li>
70
-</ul>
71
-
72
-<p>
73
-Being a core Tor developer includes triaging, diagnosing, and
74
-fixing bugs; looking for and resolving security issues; and working
75
-collaboratively with coworkers and volunteers on implementing
76
-new features and protocol changes at every stage from design to
77
-maintenance. We'd also need help making our code more scalable,
78
-testable, and maintainable. Sometimes, we need to drop everything
79
-and scramble to implement last-minute anticensorship schemes, or to
80
-deploy urgent security updates. You'd also be reviewing other people's
81
-code and designs, and looking for ways to improve it. For an idea of
82
-the breadth and depth of the work you'd be doing, have a look at <a
83
-href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/tor.git/blob/HEAD:/ChangeLog">the
84
-ChangeLog file from the Tor source distribution</a>.
85
-</p>
86
-
87
-<p>
88
-Other notes:
89
-</p>
90
-
91
-<ul>
92
-	<li>You'll need to be comfortable in this environment! We
93
-	coordinate via IRC, instant messaging, email, and bug
94
-	trackers.</li>
95
-	<li>Academic degrees are great, but not required if you have
96
-	the right experience.</li>
97
-	<li>We only write free and open source software, and we don't
98
-	believe in software patents.</li>
99
-</ul>
100
-
101
-<p>
102
-How to apply:
103
-</p>
104
-
105
-<ul>
106
-	<li>Link to a sample of code you've written in the past that
107
-	you're allowed to show us.</li>
108
-	<li>Provide a CV explaining your background, experience, skills,
109
-	and other relevant qualifications.</li>
110
-	<li>List some people who can tell us more about you: these
111
-	references could be employers or coworkers, open source projects,
112
-	etc.</li>
113
-	<li>Email the above to jobs at torproject.org.</li>
114
-</ul>
115
-
116
-<p>
117
-About the company:<br>
118
- The Tor Project is a US 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to research,
119
- development, and education about online anonymity and privacy. The Tor
120
- network's 3000 volunteer relays carry 16 Gbps for upwards of half a
121
- million daily users, including ordinary citizens who want protection
122
- from identity theft and prying corporations, corporations who want
123
- to look at a competitor's website in private, people around the world
124
- whose Internet connections are censored, and even governments and law
125
- enforcement. Tor has a staff of 14 paid developers, researchers, and
126
- advocates, plus many dozen volunteers who help out on a daily basis. Tor
127
- is funded in part by government research and development grants, and
128
- in part by individual and corporate donations.
129
-</p>
130
-
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-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
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-    <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
10
-    <a href="<page about/jobs>">Jobs</a>
11
-  </div>
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-	<div id="maincol">
13
-<h1>The Tor Project is looking for a Lead Automation Engineer!</h1>
14
-
15
-<p>The Tor Project seeks to deploy nightly builds and continuous integration for
16
-as many of its key software components and platform combinations as possible.
17
-Your job would be to build and deploy the initial functional versions of a wide
18
-range of testing frameworks and continuous integration systems.</p>
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-
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-<p>This is a contract position. Candidates are expected to be capable of taking the
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-lead in selecting, deploying, and maintaining multiple automation systems in
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-several different programming languages. Candidates should also be capable
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-of reproducing bugs and writing new reproduction test cases for one or more of
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-the testing frameworks. Eventually, we hope to add additional staff to assist
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-in this project, but to start, you will be expected to prioritize your own
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-work such that the most important tasks get attention first, without letting
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-any specific core component starve for attention.</p>
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-
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-<p>All candidates must:</p>
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-
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-<ul>
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-
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-<li>Have experience programming in multiple languages, including Java,
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-python/ruby, bash scripting, and Javascript. You must also have experience
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-working with testing/automation frameworks on multiple platforms.</li>
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-
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-<li>Be comfortable and experienced with repeatedly diving into new,
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-unfamiliar automation framework codebases, looking for ways to alter and
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-augment their functionality in specific, goal-oriented ways. This includes
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-hacking testing/automation/build software written in languages you might not
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-know (yet).</li>
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-
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-<li>Be experienced with writing useful tests for one or more testing
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-frameworks, and with using code coverage tools and bug count statistics to
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-determine testing effectiveness.</li>
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-
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-<li>Be capable of writing new tests to trigger and reproduce arbitrary bugs
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-found in the wild.</li>
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-
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-<li>Be comfortable and experienced justifying and documenting technical
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-decisions related to infrastructure choice and its use for a public,
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-world-wide technical audience.</li>
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-
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-<li>Be comfortable and effective working remotely.</li>
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-
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-<li>Be comfortable and experienced with interacting with users and other
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-developers online. Have thick enough skin to survive occasional trolling
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-from either group.</li>
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