Browse code

get rid of trailing whitespace

Roger Dingledine authored on 14/06/2014 07:19:39
Showing 1 changed files
... ...
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ includes Tor?</a></li>
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     </a></li>
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     <li><a href="#SophosOnMac">I'm using the Sophos anti-virus
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     software on my Mac, and Tor starts but I can't browse anywhere.</a></li>
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-    <li><a href="#XPCOMError">When I open the Tor Browser Bundle I get an 
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+    <li><a href="#XPCOMError">When I open the Tor Browser Bundle I get an
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 error message from the browser: "Cannot load XPCOM".</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#TBBOtherExtensions">Can I install other Firefox
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     extensions? Which extensions should I avoid using?</a></li>
... ...
@@ -173,7 +173,7 @@ be?</a></li>
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     with abuse issues.</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#BestOSForRelay">Why doesn't my Windows (or other OS) Tor
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     relay run well?</a></li>
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-    <li><a href="#PackagedTor">Should I install Tor from my package manager, 
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+    <li><a href="#PackagedTor">Should I install Tor from my package manager,
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     or build from source?</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#WhatIsTheBadExitFlag">What is the BadExit flag?</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#IGotTheBadExitFlagWhyDidThatHappen">I got the BadExit flag.
... ...
@@ -552,13 +552,13 @@ Tor?</a></h3>
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     Tor software, though. They want to distribute the <a
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     href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser</a>. This includes <a
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     href="https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/organizations/">Firefox
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-    Extended Support Release</a>, and the NoScript and HTTPS-Everywhere 
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-    extensions. You will need to follow the license for those programs as 
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-    well. Both of those Firefox extensions are distributed under 
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+    Extended Support Release</a>, and the NoScript and HTTPS-Everywhere
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+    extensions. You will need to follow the license for those programs as
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+    well. Both of those Firefox extensions are distributed under
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     the <a href="https://www.fsf.org/licensing/licenses/gpl.html">GNU General
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-    Public License</a>, while Firefox ESR is released under the Mozilla Public 
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-    License. The simplest way to obey their licenses is to include the source 
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-    code for these programs everywhere you include the bundles themselves. 
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+    Public License</a>, while Firefox ESR is released under the Mozilla Public
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+    License. The simplest way to obey their licenses is to include the source
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+    code for these programs everywhere you include the bundles themselves.
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     </p>
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     <p>
... ...
@@ -870,13 +870,13 @@ executive
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871 871
 
872 872
     <a id="Mobile"></a>
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-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Mobile">Can I use Tor on my phone or mobile 
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+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Mobile">Can I use Tor on my phone or mobile
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     device?</a></h3>
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876 876
     <p>
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-    Tor on Android devices is maintained by the <a 
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-    href="https://guardianproject.info">Guardian Project</a>. Currently, there 
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-    is no supported way of using Tor on iOS; the Guardian Project is 
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+    Tor on Android devices is maintained by the <a
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+    href="https://guardianproject.info">Guardian Project</a>. Currently, there
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+    is no supported way of using Tor on iOS; the Guardian Project is
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     working to make this a reality in the future.
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     </p>
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... ...
@@ -913,9 +913,9 @@ executive
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     those relays, and those connections will fail, leading to complex
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     anonymity implications for the clients which we'd like to avoid.
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     </p>
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- 
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+
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     <hr>
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- 
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+
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     <a id="IsItWorking"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#IsItWorking">How can I tell if Tor is
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     working, and that my connections really are anonymized?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -925,9 +925,9 @@ executive
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     coming through the Tor network. Try the <a href="https://check.torproject.org">
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     Tor Check</a> site and see whether it thinks you are using Tor or not.
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     </p>
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- 
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+
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     <hr>
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- 
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+
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     <a id="FTP"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#FTP">How do I use my browser for ftp with Tor?
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     </a></h3>
... ...
@@ -941,7 +941,7 @@ executive
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     </p>
942 942
 
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     <hr>
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- 
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+
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     <a id="NoDataScrubbing"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#NoDataScrubbing">Does Tor remove personal
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     information from the data my application sends?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -1164,9 +1164,9 @@ code under a video's "Share" option. The link switches out a URL that looks</p>
1164 1164
 <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Ubuntu">
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 I'm using Ubuntu and I can't start Tor Browser.</a></h3>
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 <p>
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-You'll need to tell Ubuntu that you want the ability to execute shell scripts 
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-from the graphical interface. Open "Files" (Unity's explorer), open 
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-Preferences-> Behavior Tab -> Set "Run executable text files when they are 
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+You'll need to tell Ubuntu that you want the ability to execute shell scripts
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+from the graphical interface. Open "Files" (Unity's explorer), open
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+Preferences-> Behavior Tab -> Set "Run executable text files when they are
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 opened" to "Ask every time", then OK.
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 </p>
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 <p>You can also start the Tor Browser from the command line by running </p>
... ...
@@ -1186,21 +1186,21 @@ internet. Go to Preferences -> Web Protection -> General, and turn off
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 the protections for "Malicious websites" and "Malicious downloads".
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 </p>
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 <p>
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-We encourage affected Sophos users to contact Sophos support about 
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+We encourage affected Sophos users to contact Sophos support about
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 this issue.
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 </p>
1192 1192
 
1193 1193
 <hr>
1194 1194
 
1195 1195
 <a id="XPCOMError"></a>
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-<h3><a class="anchor" href="#XPCOMError">When I open the Tor Browser Bundle 
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+<h3><a class="anchor" href="#XPCOMError">When I open the Tor Browser Bundle
1197 1197
 I get an error message from the browser: "Cannot load XPCOM".</a></h3>
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1199 1199
 <p>
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-This <a 
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-href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/10789">problem</a> is 
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-specifically caused by the Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus software. 
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-Consider switching to a different antivirus program. We encourage affected 
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+This <a
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+href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/10789">problem</a> is
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+specifically caused by the Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus software.
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+Consider switching to a different antivirus program. We encourage affected
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 Webroot users to contact Webroot support about this issue.
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  </p>
1206 1206
 
... ...
@@ -1345,7 +1345,7 @@ Why does Google show up in foreign languages?</a></h3>
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 If you really want to see Google in English you can click the link that
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 provides that. But we consider this a feature with Tor, not a bug --- the
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 Internet is not flat, and it in fact does look different depending on
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-where you are. This feature reminds people of this fact. 
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+where you are. This feature reminds people of this fact.
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 </p>
1350 1350
 <p>
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 Note that Google search URLs take name/value pairs as arguments and one
... ...
@@ -1461,7 +1461,7 @@ configuration</a> of Tor and Privoxy.
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 </p>
1462 1462
 
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 <p>
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-If you're unable to use the application's native proxy settings, all hope is 
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+If you're unable to use the application's native proxy settings, all hope is
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 not lost. See <a href="#CantSetProxy">below</a>.
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 </p>
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... ...
@@ -1568,12 +1568,12 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#VerifyDownload">How do I verify the download
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     (sha256sums.txt)?</a></h3>
1570 1570
 
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-    <p>Instructions are on the <a 
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-    href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>#BuildVerification">verifying 
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+    <p>Instructions are on the <a
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+    href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>#BuildVerification">verifying
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     signatures</a> page.</p>
1574 1574
 
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     <hr>
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-    
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+
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     <a id="NewIdentityClosingTabs"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#NewIdentityClosingTabs">Why does "New
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     Identity" close all my open tabs?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -2206,9 +2206,9 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
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     consider <a href="https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-relay-debian">helping
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     out</a>.
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     </p>
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- 
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+
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     <hr>
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- 
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+
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     <a id="WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore">Why isn't my
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     relay being used more?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -2227,7 +2227,7 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
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     "https://lists.torproject.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/tor-relays/">
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     tor-relays list</a>.
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     </p>
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- 
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+
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     <hr>
2232 2232
 
2233 2233
     <a id="IDontHaveAStaticIP"></a>
... ...
@@ -2268,17 +2268,17 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
2268 2268
 
2269 2269
     <hr>
2270 2270
 
2271
-    <a id="HighCapacityConnection"></a> 
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+    <a id="HighCapacityConnection"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#HighCapacityConnection">How can I get Tor to fully
2273 2273
     make use of my high capacity connection?</a></h3>
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- 
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+
2275 2275
     <p>
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     See <a href="http://archives.seul.org/or/relays/Aug-2010/msg00034.html">this
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     tor-relays thread</a>.
2278 2278
     </p>
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- 
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-    <hr> 
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- 
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+
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+    <hr>
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+
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     <a id="RelayFlexible"></a>
2283 2283
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#RelayFlexible">How stable does my relay
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 need to be?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -2330,7 +2330,7 @@ too.
2330 2330
     </ul>
2331 2331
 
2332 2332
     <hr>
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- 
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+
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     <a id="BandwidthShaping"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#BandwidthShaping">What bandwidth shaping
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     options are available to Tor relays?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -2599,29 +2599,29 @@ users
2599 2599
     <hr>
2600 2600
 
2601 2601
     <a id="PackagedTor"></a>
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-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#PackagedTor">Should I install Tor from my 
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+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#PackagedTor">Should I install Tor from my
2603 2603
     package manager, or build from source?</a></h3>
2604 2604
     <p>
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-    If you're using Debian or Ubuntu especially, there are a number of benefits 
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-    to installing Tor from the <a 
2607
-    href="https://www.torproject.org/docs/debian.html.en">Tor Project's 
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-    repository</a>. 
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+    If you're using Debian or Ubuntu especially, there are a number of benefits
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+    to installing Tor from the <a
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+    href="https://www.torproject.org/docs/debian.html.en">Tor Project's
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+    repository</a>.
2609 2609
     </p>
2610 2610
     <ul>
2611 2611
       <li>
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-      You're ulimit -n gets set to 32768, high enough for Tor to keep open all 
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-      the connections it needs. 
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+      You're ulimit -n gets set to 32768, high enough for Tor to keep open all
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+      the connections it needs.
2614 2614
       </li>
2615 2615
       <li>
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-      A user profile is created just for Tor, so Tor doesn't need to run as 
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+      A user profile is created just for Tor, so Tor doesn't need to run as
2617 2617
       root.
2618 2618
       </li>
2619 2619
       <li>
2620 2620
       An init script is included so that Tor runs at boot.
2621 2621
       </li>
2622 2622
       <li>
2623
-      Tor runs with --verify-config, so that most problems with your 
2624
-      config file get caught. 
2623
+      Tor runs with --verify-config, so that most problems with your
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+      config file get caught.
2625 2625
       </li>
2626 2626
       <li>
2627 2627
       Tor can bind to low level ports, then drop privileges.
... ...
@@ -2666,7 +2666,7 @@ users
2666 2666
     of the Guards: A Framework for Understanding and Improving Entry Guard
2667 2667
     Selection in Tor</a>.
2668 2668
     </p>
2669
- 
2669
+
2670 2670
     <hr>
2671 2671
 
2672 2672
     <a id="TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications"></a>
... ...
@@ -3257,7 +3257,7 @@ diversity,
3257 3257
     <a id="AccessHiddenServices"></a>
3258 3258
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AccessHiddenServices">How do I access
3259 3259
     hidden services?</a></h3>
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- 
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+
3261 3261
     <p>
3262 3262
     Tor hidden services are named with a special top-level domain (TLD)
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     name in DNS: .onion. Since the .onion TLD is not recognized by the
... ...
@@ -3272,7 +3272,7 @@ diversity,
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  Tor directly. You can't try to resolve it to an IP address, since there
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  <i>is</i> no corresponding IP address: the server is hidden, after all!
3274 3274
 </p>
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- 
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+
3276 3276
     <p>
3277 3277
     So, how do you make your application pass the hostname directly to Tor?
3278 3278
     You can't use SOCKS 4, since SOCKS 4 proxies require an IP from the
... ...
@@ -3282,7 +3282,7 @@ diversity,
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     SOCKS proxy. SOCKS 4a, however, always accepts a hostname: You'll need
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     to use SOCKS 4a.
3284 3284
     </p>
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- 
3285
+
3286 3286
     <p>
3287 3287
     Some applications, such as the browsers Mozilla Firefox and Apple's
3288 3288
     Safari, support sending DNS queries to Tor's SOCKS 5 proxy. Most web
... ...
@@ -3290,7 +3290,7 @@ diversity,
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     to point your web browser at an HTTP proxy, and tell the HTTP proxy
3291 3291
     to speak to Tor with SOCKS 4a. We recommend Polipo as your HTTP proxy.
3292 3292
     </p>
3293
- 
3293
+
3294 3294
     <p>
3295 3295
     For applications that do not support HTTP proxy, and so cannot use
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     Polipo, <a href="http://www.freecap.ru/eng/">FreeCap</a> is an
... ...
@@ -3299,24 +3299,24 @@ diversity,
3299 3299
     will allow you to use almost any program with Tor without leaking DNS
3300 3300
     lookups and allow those same programs to access hidden services.
3301 3301
     </p>
3302
- 
3302
+
3303 3303
     <p>
3304 3304
     See also the <a href="#SocksAndDNS">question on DNS</a>.
3305
-    </p> 
3306
- 
3305
+    </p>
3306
+
3307 3307
     <hr>
3308 3308
 
3309 3309
     <a id="ProvideAHiddenService"></a>
3310 3310
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ProvideAHiddenService">How do I provide a
3311 3311
     hidden service?</a></h3>
3312
- 
3312
+
3313 3313
     <p>
3314 3314
     See the <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">
3315 3315
     official hidden service configuration instructions</a>.
3316 3316
     </p>
3317 3317
 
3318 3318
     <hr>
3319
- 
3319
+
3320 3320
     <a id="Development"></a>
3321 3321
     <h2><a class="anchor">Development:</a></h2>
3322 3322
 
... ...
@@ -3357,7 +3357,7 @@ diversity,
3357 3357
     <a id="PrivateTorNetwork"></a>
3358 3358
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#PrivateTorNetwork">How do I set up my
3359 3359
     own private Tor network?</a></h3>
3360
- 
3360
+
3361 3361
     <p>
3362 3362
     If you want to experiment locally with your own network, or you're
3363 3363
     cut off from the Internet and want to be able to mess with Tor still,
... ...
@@ -3436,7 +3436,7 @@ diversity,
3436 3436
 
3437 3437
     <a id="WhatIsLibevent"></a>
3438 3438
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhatIsLibevent">What is Libevent?</a></h3>
3439
- 
3439
+
3440 3440
     <p>
3441 3441
     When you want to deal with a bunch of net connections at once, you
3442 3442
     have a few options:
... ...
@@ -3479,7 +3479,7 @@ diversity,
3479 3479
     <a id="MyNewFeature"></a>
3480 3480
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#MyNewFeature">What do I need to do to get
3481 3481
     a new feature into Tor?</a></h3>
3482
- 
3482
+
3483 3483
     <p>
3484 3484
     For a new feature to go into Tor, it needs to be designed (explain what
3485 3485
     you think Tor should do), argued to be secure (explain why it's better
... ...
@@ -3502,7 +3502,7 @@ diversity,
3502 3502
     <a id="WhatProtectionsDoesTorProvide"></a>
3503 3503
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhatProtectionsDoesTorProvide">What
3504 3504
     protections does Tor provide?</a></h3>
3505
- 
3505
+
3506 3506
     <p>
3507 3507
     Internet communication is based on a store-and-forward model that
3508 3508
     can be understood in analogy to postal mail: Data is transmitted in
... ...
@@ -3518,7 +3518,7 @@ diversity,
3518 3518
     server in the Internet that can see any of the packets can profile your
3519 3519
     behaviour.
3520 3520
     </p>
3521
- 
3521
+
3522 3522
     <p>
3523 3523
     The aim of Tor is to improve your privacy by sending your traffic through
3524 3524
     a series of proxies. Your communication is encrypted in multiple layers
... ...
@@ -3529,11 +3529,11 @@ diversity,
3529 3529
     communicating with Tor nodes. Similarly, servers in the Internet just
3530 3530
     see that they are being contacted by Tor nodes.
3531 3531
     </p>
3532
- 
3532
+
3533 3533
     <p>
3534 3534
     Generally speaking, Tor aims to solve three privacy problems:
3535 3535
     </p>
3536
- 
3536
+
3537 3537
     <p>
3538 3538
     First, Tor prevents websites and other services from learning
3539 3539
     your location, which they can use to build databases about your
... ...
@@ -3541,13 +3541,13 @@ diversity,
3541 3541
     give you away by default -- now you can have the ability to choose,
3542 3542
     for each connection, how much information to reveal.
3543 3543
     </p>
3544
- 
3544
+
3545 3545
     <p>
3546 3546
     Second, Tor prevents people watching your traffic locally (such as
3547 3547
     your ISP) from learning what information you're fetching and where
3548 3548
     you're fetching it from. It also stops them from deciding what you're
3549 3549
     allowed to learn and publish -- if you can get to any part of the Tor
3550
-    network, you can reach any site on the Internet.  
3550
+    network, you can reach any site on the Internet.
3551 3551
     </p>
3552 3552
 
3553 3553
     <p>
... ...
@@ -3557,26 +3557,26 @@ diversity,
3557 3557
     provides more security than the old <a href="#Torisdifferent">one hop proxy
3558 3558
     </a> approach.
3559 3559
     </p>
3560
- 
3560
+
3561 3561
     <p>
3562 3562
     Note, however, that there are situations where Tor fails to solve these
3563 3563
     privacy problems entirely: see the entry below on <a
3564
-    href="#AttacksOnOnionRouting">remaining attacks</a>. 
3564
+    href="#AttacksOnOnionRouting">remaining attacks</a>.
3565 3565
     </p>
3566
- 
3566
+
3567 3567
     <hr>
3568
- 
3568
+
3569 3569
     <a id="CanExitNodesEavesdrop"></a>
3570 3570
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#CanExitNodesEavesdrop">Can exit nodes eavesdrop
3571 3571
     on communications? Isn't that bad?</a></h3>
3572
- 
3572
+
3573 3573
     <p>
3574 3574
     Yes, the guy running the exit node can read the bytes that come in and
3575 3575
     out there. Tor anonymizes the origin of your traffic, and it makes sure
3576 3576
     to encrypt everything inside the Tor network, but it does not magically
3577 3577
     encrypt all traffic throughout the Internet.
3578 3578
     </p>
3579
- 
3579
+
3580 3580
     <p>
3581 3581
     This is why you should always use end-to-end encryption such as SSL for
3582 3582
     sensitive Internet connections. (The corollary to this answer is that if
... ...
@@ -3584,7 +3584,7 @@ diversity,
3584 3584
     *not* using end-to-end encryption at the application layer, then something
3585 3585
     has already gone wrong and you shouldn't be thinking that Tor is the problem.)
3586 3586
     </p>
3587
- 
3587
+
3588 3588
     <p>
3589 3589
     Tor does provide a partial solution in a very specific situation, though.
3590 3590
     When you make a connection to a destination that also runs a Tor relay,
... ...
@@ -3602,9 +3602,9 @@ diversity,
3602 3602
     does the Tor client learn which relays are associated with which
3603 3603
     websites in a decentralized yet non-gamable way?").
3604 3604
     </p>
3605
-         
3605
+
3606 3606
     <hr>
3607
- 
3607
+
3608 3608
     <a id="AmITotallyAnonymous"></a>
3609 3609
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AmITotallyAnonymous">So I'm totally anonymous
3610 3610
     if I use Tor?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -3729,7 +3729,7 @@ diversity,
3729 3729
     </p>
3730 3730
 
3731 3731
     <hr>
3732
- 
3732
+
3733 3733
     <a id="KeyManagement"></a>
3734 3734
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#KeyManagement">Tell me about all the
3735 3735
 keys Tor uses.</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -3995,10 +3995,10 @@ ZKS's Freedom network could) -- but maybe that's a good thing at this stage.
3995 3995
 
3996 3996
     <a id="IsTorLikeAVPN"></a>
3997 3997
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#IsTorLikeAVPN">Is Tor like a VPN?</a></h3>
3998
- 
3998
+
3999 3999
     <p>
4000
-    <b>Do not use a VPN as an <a href="http://www.nbcnews.com/news/investigations/war-anonymous-british-spies-attacked-hackers-snowden-docs-show-n21361">anonymity solution</a>.</b> 
4001
-    If you're looking for a trusted entry into the Tor network, or if you want 
4000
+    <b>Do not use a VPN as an <a href="http://www.nbcnews.com/news/investigations/war-anonymous-british-spies-attacked-hackers-snowden-docs-show-n21361">anonymity solution</a>.</b>
4001
+    If you're looking for a trusted entry into the Tor network, or if you want
4002 4002
     to obscure the fact that you're using Tor, <a
4003 4003
     href="https://www.torproject.org/docs/bridges#RunningABridge">setting up
4004 4004
     a private server as a bridge</a> works quite well.
... ...
@@ -4044,7 +4044,7 @@ ZKS's Freedom network could) -- but maybe that's a good thing at this stage.
4044 4044
     <a id="Proxychains"></a>
4045 4045
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Proxychains">Aren't 10 proxies
4046 4046
     (proxychains) better than Tor with only 3 hops?</a></h3>
4047
- 
4047
+
4048 4048
     <p>
4049 4049
     Proxychains is a program that sends your traffic through a series of
4050 4050
     open web proxies that you supply before sending it on to your final
... ...
@@ -4066,9 +4066,9 @@ ZKS's Freedom network could) -- but maybe that's a good thing at this stage.
4066 4066
     engine are compromised machines, misconfigured private proxies
4067 4067
     not intended for public use, or honeypots set up to exploit users.
4068 4068
     </p>
4069
- 
4069
+
4070 4070
     <hr>
4071
- 
4071
+
4072 4072
 
4073 4073
 <a id="AttacksOnOnionRouting"></a>
4074 4074
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AttacksOnOnionRouting">What attacks remain
... ...
@@ -4516,7 +4516,7 @@ only solution is to have no opinion.
4516 4516
     <a id="SendPadding"></a>
4517 4517
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#SendPadding">You should send padding so it's
4518 4518
     more secure.</a></h3>
4519
- 
4519
+
4520 4520
     <p>
4521 4521
     Like all anonymous communication networks that are fast enough for web
4522 4522
     browsing, Tor is vulnerable to statistical "traffic confirmation"
... ...
@@ -4525,7 +4525,7 @@ only solution is to have no opinion.
4525 4525
     nice if we could use cover traffic to confuse this attack. But there
4526 4526
     are three problems here:
4527 4527
     </p>
4528
- 
4528
+
4529 4529
     <ul>
4530 4530
     <li>
4531 4531
     Cover traffic is really expensive. And *every* user needs to be doing
... ...
@@ -4548,26 +4548,26 @@ only solution is to have no opinion.
4548 4548
     patterns later in the path.
4549 4549
     </li>
4550 4550
     </ul>
4551
- 
4551
+
4552 4552
     <p>
4553 4553
     In short, for a system like Tor that aims to be fast, we don't see any
4554 4554
     use for padding, and it would definitely be a serious usability problem.
4555 4555
     We hope that one day somebody will prove us wrong, but we are not
4556 4556
     optimistic.
4557 4557
     </p>
4558
- 
4558
+
4559 4559
     <hr>
4560 4560
 
4561 4561
     <a id="Steganography"></a>
4562 4562
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Steganography">You should use steganography to hide Tor
4563 4563
     traffic.</a></h3>
4564
- 
4564
+
4565 4565
     <p>
4566 4566
     Many people suggest that we should use steganography to make it hard
4567 4567
     to notice Tor connections on the Internet. There are a few problems
4568 4568
     with this idea though:
4569 4569
     </p>
4570
- 
4570
+
4571 4571
     <p>
4572 4572
     First, in the current network topology, the Tor relays list <a
4573 4573
     href="#HideExits">is public</a> and can be accessed by attackers.
... ...
@@ -4575,7 +4575,7 @@ only solution is to have no opinion.
4575 4575
     always just notice <b>any connection</b> to or from a Tor relay's
4576 4576
     IP address.
4577 4577
     </p>
4578
- 
4578
+
4579 4579
     <hr>
4580 4580
 
4581 4581
     <a id="Abuse"></a>