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Add 1 FAQ entry and cleaned up some links.

Matt Pagan authored on 18/12/2013 22:10:36
Showing 1 changed files
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@@ -88,6 +88,8 @@ tells
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     languages?</li></a>
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     <li><a href="#GmailWarning">Gmail warns me that my account may have
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     been compromised.</a></li>
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+    <li><a href="#NeedToUseAProxy">My internet connection requires an HTTP 
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+    or SOCKS Proxy</a></li>
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     </ul>
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     <p>Advanced Tor usage:</p>
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@@ -107,7 +109,7 @@ country)
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     are used for entry/exit?</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#FirewallPorts">My firewall only allows a few outgoing
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     ports.</a></li>
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-    <li><a href="#ExitPorts">Is there a list of default exit ports?</a></li>
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+    <li><a href="#DefaultExitPorts">Is there a list of default exit ports?</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#SocksAndDNS">How do I check if my application that uses 
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     SOCKS is leaking DNS requests?</a></li>
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     <li><a href="#DifferentComputer">I want to run my Tor client on a 
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@@ -837,7 +839,7 @@ executive
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     </p>
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     <p>
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     If you really need to connect to only a small set of ports, see the FAQ 
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-    entry on firewalled ports.
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+    entry on <a href="#FirewallPorts">firewalled ports</a>.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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     Note that if you're running Tor as a relay, you must allow outgoing 
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@@ -1399,6 +1401,36 @@ recent logins and wondering if you actually logged in at those times.
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 <hr>
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+<a id="NeedToUseAProxy"></a>
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+<h3><a class="anchor" href="#NeedToUseAProxy">My internet connection requires an HTTP 
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+    or SOCKS Proxy</a></h3>
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+
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+<p>
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+You can set Proxy IP address, port, and authentication information in 
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+Tor Browser's Network Settings. If you're using Tor another way, check 
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+out the HTTPProxy and HTTPSProxy config options in the <a 
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+href="https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-manual.html.en">man page</a>, 
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+and modify your torrc file accordingly. You will need an HTTP proxy for 
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+doing GET requests to fetch the Tor directory, and you will need an 
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+HTTPS proxy for doing CONNECT requests to get to Tor relays. (It's fine 
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+if they're the same proxy.) Tor also recognizes the torrc options 
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+Socks4Proxy and Socks5Proxy. 
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+</p>
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+<p>
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+Also check out HTTPProxyAuthenticator and HTTPSProxyAuthenticator if your 
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+proxy requires auth. We only support basic auth currently, but if you need 
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+NTLM authentication, you find <a 
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+href="http://archives.seul.org/or/talk/Jun-2005/msg00223.html">this post 
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+in the archives</a> useful. 
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+</p>
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+<p>
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+If your proxies only allow you to connect to certain ports, look at the 
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+entry on <a href="#FirewallPorts">Firewalled clients</a> for how 
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+to restrict what ports your Tor will try to access. 
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+</p>
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+
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+<hr>
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+
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 <a id="torrc"></a>
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 <h3><a class="anchor" href="#torrc">I'm supposed to "edit my torrc".
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 What does that mean?</a></h3>
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@@ -1607,7 +1639,7 @@ day and date under the 'Date &amp; Time' Tab. Also make sure your time
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 zone is correct.</li>
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 <li>Is your Internet connection <a href="#FirewallPorts">firewalled
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 by port</a>, or do you normally need to use a <a
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-href="<wikifaq>#MyInternetconnectionrequiresanHTTPorSOCKSproxy.">proxy</a>?
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+href="<#NeedToUseAProxy">proxy</a>?
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 </li>
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 <li>Are you running programs like Norton Internet Security or SELinux
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 that
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@@ -1862,8 +1894,8 @@ use the ReachableAddresses config options, e.g.:
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 <hr>
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-    <a id="ExitPorts"></a>
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-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ExitPorts">Is there a list of default exit 
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+    <a id="DefaultExitPorts"></a>
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+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#DefaultExitPorts">Is there a list of default exit 
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     ports?</a></h3>
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     <p>
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 The default open ports are listed below but keep in mind that, any port or 
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@@ -2017,7 +2049,7 @@ relays.
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     <li>If your relay is behind a NAT and it doesn't know its public
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     IP (e.g. it has an IP of 192.168.x.y), you'll need to set up port
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     forwarding. Forwarding TCP connections is system dependent but
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-    <a href="<wikifaq>#ImbehindaNATFirewall">this FAQ entry</a>
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+    <a href="#BehindANAT">this FAQ entry</a>
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     offers some examples on how to do this.
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     </li>
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     <li>Your relay will passively estimate and advertise its recent
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@@ -2058,7 +2090,7 @@ encounter</a>
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     <p>
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     The default exit policy allows access to many popular services
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     (e.g. web browsing), but <a
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-href="<wikifaq>#Istherealistofdefaultexitports">restricts</a>
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+href="#DefaultExitPorts">restricts</a>
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     some due to abuse potential (e.g. mail) and some since
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     the Tor network can't handle the load (e.g. default
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     file-sharing ports). You can change your exit policy
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@@ -2589,12 +2621,14 @@ html">release
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 use
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     this feature.</li>
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+<!-- Nickm says he's not sure this is still accurate
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+
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     <li>If you're running on Solaris, OpenBSD, NetBSD, or
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     old FreeBSD, Tor is probably forking separate processes
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     rather than using threads. Consider switching to a <a
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     href="<wikifaq>#WhydoesntmyWindowsorotherOSTorrelayrunwell">better
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     operating system</a>.</li>
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-
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+-->
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     <li>If you still can't handle the memory load, consider reducing the
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     amount of bandwidth your relay advertises. Advertising less
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 bandwidth
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@@ -3481,7 +3515,7 @@ Tor user be a relay.</a></h3>
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     <p>
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     Requiring every Tor user to be a relay would help with scaling the
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     network to handle all our users, and <a
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-    href="<wikifaq>#DoIgetbetteranonymityifIrunarelay">running a Tor
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+    href="#BetterAnonymity">running a Tor
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     relay may help your anonymity</a>. However, many Tor users cannot be
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 good
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     relays &mdash; for example, some Tor clients operate from behind
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@@ -3607,7 +3641,7 @@ problems are:
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 <li>IP packets reveal OS characteristics. We would still need to do
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 IP-level packet normalization, to stop things like TCP fingerprinting
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 attacks. Given the diversity and complexity of TCP stacks, along with <a
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-href="<wikifaq>#DoesTorresistremotephysicaldevicefingerprinting">device
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+href="#RemotePhysicalDeviceFingerprinting">device
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 fingerprinting attacks</a>, it looks like our best bet is shipping our
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 own user-space TCP stack.
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 </li>