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clean up the 'how is tor different' section

Roger Dingledine authored on 11/03/2016 22:05:54
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@@ -301,25 +301,22 @@ things?</a></li>
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     </p>
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     <p>
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-    The Tor software is a program you can run on your computer that
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-helps keep
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-    you safe on the Internet. Tor protects you by bouncing your
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-communications
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+    Tor is a program you can run on your computer that helps keep
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+    you safe on the Internet. It protects you by bouncing your communications
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     around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around
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-    the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection
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-from
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+    the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from
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     learning what sites you visit, and it prevents the sites you visit
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-    from learning your physical location. This set of volunteer relays
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-is
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-    called the Tor network. You can read more about how Tor works on the
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-<a
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-    href="<page about/overview>">overview page</a>.
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+    from learning your physical location.
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+    This set of volunteer relays is called the <b>Tor network</b>.
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+    The way most people use Tor is with <b>Tor Browser</b>,
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+    which is a version of Firefox that fixes many privacy issues.
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+    You can read more about how Tor works on the <a href="<page
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+    about/overview>">overview page</a>.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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-    The Tor Project is a non-profit (charity) organization that
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-maintains
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-    and develops the Tor software.
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+    The <b>Tor Project</b> is a non-profit (charity) organization that
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+    maintains and develops the Tor software.
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     </p>
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     <hr>
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@@ -342,47 +339,38 @@ install anything.  You just have to point your browser at their proxy
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 server.
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 Simple proxy providers are fine solutions if you do not want protections
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 for
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-your privacy and anonymity online and you trust the provider from doing
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+your privacy and anonymity online and you trust the provider to not do
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 bad
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 things.  Some simple proxy providers use SSL to secure your connection
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-to them.
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-This may protect you against local eavesdroppers, such as those at a
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-cafe with
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-free wifi Internet.
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+to them, which protects you against local eavesdroppers, such as those at a
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+cafe with free wifi Internet.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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     Simple proxy providers also create a single point of failure.  The
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 provider
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-knows who you are and where you browse on the Internet.  They can see
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+knows both who you are and what you browse on the Internet.  They can see
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 your
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 traffic as it passes through their server.  In some cases, they can even
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 see
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 inside your
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 encrypted traffic as they relay it to your banking site or to ecommerce
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 stores.
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-You have to trust the provider isn't doing any number of things, such as
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+You have to trust the provider isn't
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 watching your traffic, injecting their own advertisements into your
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 traffic
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-stream, and recording your personal details.
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+stream, or recording your personal details.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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     Tor passes your traffic through at least 3 different servers before
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 sending
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 it on to the destination. Because there's a separate layer of encryption
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 for
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-each of the three relays, Tor does not modify, or even know, what you
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-are
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-sending into it.  It merely relays your traffic, completely encrypted
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-through
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-the Tor network and has it pop out somewhere else in the world,
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-completely
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-intact.  The Tor client is required because we assume you trust your
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-local
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-computer.  The Tor client manages the encryption and the path chosen
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-through
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-the network.  The relays located all over the world merely pass
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-encrypted
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-packets between themselves.</p>
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+each of the three relays, somebody watching your Internet connection
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+can't modify, or read, what you are
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+sending into the Tor network. Your traffic is encrypted between the Tor
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+client (on your computer) and where it pops out somewhere else in the
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+world.
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+</p>
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     <p>
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     <dl>
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     <dt>Doesn't the first server see who I am?</dt><dd>Possibly. A bad
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@@ -395,18 +383,16 @@ merely sees
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 world, so
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 using Tor by itself is fine.  You are still protected from this node
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 figuring
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-out who you are and where you are going on the Internet.</dd>
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+out both who you are and where you are going on the Internet.</dd>
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     <dt>Can't the third server see my traffic?</dt><dd>Possibly.  A bad
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 third
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 of three servers can see the traffic you sent into Tor.  It won't know
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 who sent
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-this traffic.  If you're using encryption, such as visiting a bank or
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-e-commerce website, or encrypted mail connections, etc, it will only
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-know the
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-destination.  It won't be able to see the data inside the traffic
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-stream.  You
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-are still protected from this node figuring out who you are and if using
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-encryption, what data you're sending to the destination.</dd>
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+this traffic.  If you're using encryption (like
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+HTTPS), it will only know the destination. See <a
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+href="https://www.eff.org/pages/tor-and-https">this visualization of
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+Tor and HTTPS</a> to understand how Tor and HTTPS interact.
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+</dd>
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     </dl>
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     </p>
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