Browse code

Merge master

hiromipaw authored on05/12/2017 18:10:06
Showing46 changed files
... ...
@@ -14,8 +14,8 @@
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 # branch to your personal webwml repository, open a trac ticket in the
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 # website component, and set it to needs_review.
16 16
 
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-export STABLETAG=tor-0.3.1.8
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-export DEVTAG=tor-0.3.2.4-alpha
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+export STABLETAG=tor-0.3.1.9
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+export DEVTAG=tor-0.3.2.6-alpha
19 19
 
20 20
 WMLBASE=.
21 21
 SUBDIRS=docs eff projects press about download getinvolved donate docs/torbutton
... ...
@@ -116,14 +116,14 @@
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         </td>
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       </tr>
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       <tr>
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-        <td>
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+        <td class="beige">
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           <div class="name">Ramy Raoof</div>
121 121
           <div class="caps">Director</div>
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           <p>
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-            Ramy is a technologist and privacy and security researcher with a passion for free/open culture. He has provided and developed digital security plans and strategies for NGOs and members of the media, emergency response in cases of physical threats, support on publishing sensitive materials, secure systems for managing sensitive information, and operational plans for human rights emergency response teams, in Egypt and the MENA region. Most recently, Ramy has been volunteering with different NGOs and civil liberty groups in Central & South America, to enhance their privacy and security through means of behavioral change based on understanding surveillance and threat models in their own contexts and environments. Among different hats, Ramy is Senior Research Technologist at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR), Research Fellow with Citizen Lab, and currently a volunteer visitor with Fundación Acceso assisting collectives and networks in Central America around infosec and activism. He is also an Internet Freedom Festival Fellow on security and privacy best practices. Ramy has received multiple international awards for his important work. Most recently, Ramy received the 2017 Heroes of Human Rights and Communications Surveillance from Access Now earlier this month. 
123
+            Ramy is a technologist and privacy and security researcher with a passion for free/open culture. He has provided and developed digital security plans and strategies for NGOs and members of the media, emergency response in cases of physical threats, support on publishing sensitive materials, secure systems for managing sensitive information, and operational plans for human rights emergency response teams, in Egypt and the MENA region. Most recently, Ramy has been volunteering with different NGOs and civil liberty groups in Central & South America, to enhance their privacy and security through means of behavioral change based on understanding surveillance and threat models in their own contexts and environments. Among different hats, Ramy is Senior Research Technologist at the Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR), Research Fellow with Citizen Lab, and currently a volunteer visitor with Fundación Acceso assisting collectives and networks in Central America around infosec and activism. He is also an Internet Freedom Festival Fellow on security and privacy best practices. Ramy has received multiple international awards for his important work. Most recently, Ramy received the 2017 Heroes of Human Rights and Communications Surveillance from Access Now. 
124 124
           </p>
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         </td>
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-        <td class="beige">
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+        <td>
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           <div class="name">Julius Mittenzwei</div>
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           <div class="caps">Director</div>
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           <p>
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@@ -16,9 +16,11 @@
16 16
     <li><a href="#support">Support</a></li>
17 17
     <li><a href="#irc">IRC</a></li>
18 18
     <li><a href="#twitter">Twitter</a></li>
19
+    <li><a href="#bugs">Bug Tracker</a></li>
20
+    <li><a href="#security">Security Issues</a></li>
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+    <li><a href="#badrelays">Report Bad Relays</a></li>
19 22
     <li><a href="#email">Email</a></li>
20 23
     <li><a href="#mail">Mailing Address</a></li>
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-    <li><a href="#security">Security Issues</a></li>
22 24
     </ul>
23 25
 
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     <a id="support"></a>
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@@ -88,7 +90,34 @@
88 90
 	</ul>
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     </p>
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-    <a id="email"></a>
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+	<a id="bugs"></a>
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+	<h3><a class="anchor" href="#bugs">Bug Tracker</a></h3>
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+	<p>You can report bugs other than <a href="#security">security 
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+	issues</a> using our <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor"
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+	>bug tracker</a>. Our 
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+	<a href="<page getinvolved/volunteer>">volunteer page</a> has 
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+	convenient links to <a href="<page getinvolved/volunteer>#Projects"> 
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+	project-related queries</a>.</p>
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+    
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+	<a id="security"></a>
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+	<h3><a class="anchor" href="#security">Security Issues</a></h3>
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+	<p>If you've found a security issue in one of our projects or our
105
+	infrastructure, please email the respective maintainer. You can find
106
+	their GPG fingerprint/key on our <a
107
+	href="https://db.torproject.org">developer ldap search page</a>. Due
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+	to the many different projects we have, we do not offer a single
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+	list for security issues.</p>
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+
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+	<a id="badrelays"></a>
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+	<h3><a class="anchor" href="#badrelays">Report Bad Relays</a></h3>
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+	<p>If you find a relay that you think is malicious, misconfigured, 
114
+	or otherwise broken, please check out our 
115
+	<a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/ReportingBadRelays">
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+	wiki page</a> and <a href="https://blog.torproject.org/how-report-bad-relays"
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+	>blog post</a> on how to report it.</p>
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+
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+
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+	<a id="email"></a>
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     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#email">Email</a></h3>
93 122
     <p>If you have Tor questions, please try to help yourself via the
94 123
     above support venues. Please don't use this contact address
... ...
@@ -116,15 +145,6 @@
116 145
 Seattle, WA 98194 USA<br><br>
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 </address>
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-    <a id="security"></a>
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-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#security">Security Issues</a></h3>
121
-    <p>If you've found a security issue in one of our projects or our
122
-    infrastructure, please email the respective maintainer. You can find
123
-    their GPG fingerprint/key on our <a
124
-    href="https://db.torproject.org">developer ldap search page</a>. Due
125
-    to the many different projects we have, we do not offer a single
126
-    list for security issues.
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-
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   </div>
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   <!-- END MAINCOL -->
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   <div id = "sidecol">
... ...
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ href="http://cryptocracy.net/">personal website</a>.</dd>
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 management, travel, and other projects.</dd>
37 37
 
38 38
 <dt>Domenik Bork</dt><dd> Worked on
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-Configuration of Hidden Services with User Authorization in Vidalia as
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+Configuration of Onion Services with User Authorization in Vidalia as
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 part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
41 41
 <dt>Benedikt Boss</dt><dd>Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of Code on <a
42 42
 href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/topf/trunk/README">TOPF</a>,
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@@ -91,6 +91,8 @@ Builds</a>.</dd>
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 <dd>Original developer for Vidalia,
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 a cross-platform Tor Graphical User Interface included in the bundles.</dd>
93 93
 
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+<dt>Roya Ensafi</dt><dd>Detects and understands how to manipulate and circumvent Tor network censorship attempts.</dd>
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+
94 96
 <dt>Christian Fromme, Developer</dt>
95 97
 <dd>Helped with many Python projects, such as the
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 get-tor email auto-responder, check.torproject.org, bridge db,
... ...
@@ -129,9 +131,6 @@ Arora fork</a>, the <a
129 131
 href="http://code.google.com/p/torsocks/">torsocks
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 scripts</a>, and other useful peripheral tools.</dd>
131 133
 
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-<dt>Dr. Nick Hopper, Researcher</dt>
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-<dd>Cryptographer, privacy expert, and professor.</dd>
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-
135 134
 <dt>Leiah Jansen, Graphic Designer</dt>
136 135
 <dd>Helped make our cool logos, designs, stickers, graphics, and so on.
137 136
 Invented the awesome "roots" Tor logo.</dd>
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@@ -182,7 +181,7 @@ proxying approach for Tor clients on Windows.</dd>
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 Tor is based on, so we didn't have to start from scratch.</dd>
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 <dt>Robert Ransom</dt><dd>Found and fixed a bunch of Tor bugs, mostly in
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-Tor's hidden service code, and added several security and usability
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+Tor's onion service code, and added several security and usability
186 185
 features to Tor and Tor Browser Bundle.</dd>
187 186
 
188 187
 <dt>Johannes Renner</dt><dd> Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of
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@@ -236,7 +235,7 @@ Bundle build process, especially on Windows.</dd>
236 235
 <dt>Kyle Williams</dt><dd>Developer for JanusVM, a VMWare-based
237 236
 transparent Tor proxy that makes Tor easier to set up and use.</dd>
238 237
 <dt>Christian Wilms</dt><dd> Worked on
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-Performance Enhancing Measures for Tor Hidden Services (<a
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+Performance Enhancing Measures for Tor Onion Services (<a
240 239
 href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewvs.cgi/tor/branches/hidserv-perf/">svn</a>) as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
241 240
 <dt>Jillian C. York</dt><dd><a href="http://jilliancyork.com/">Jillian C. York</a> is a writer, blogger, and activist.</dd>
242 241
 </dl>
... ...
@@ -2,6 +2,8 @@
2 2
 # Revision: $Revision$
3 3
 # Translation-Priority: 3-low
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 #include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Core People" CHARSET="UTF-8"
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+<link href="$(DOCROOT)/css/people-table.css" rel="stylesheet">
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+
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 <div id="content" class="clearfix">
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 <div id="breadcrumbs">
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     <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
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@@ -10,48 +12,6 @@
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 </div>
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 <div id="maincol">
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-<style>
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-table.people td {
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-  vertical-align: top;
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-  padding: 0px;
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-  padding-bottom: 15px;
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-  width: 50%;
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-}
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-
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-table.people tr td:first-child {
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-  padding-right: 10px;
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-}
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-
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-.photo {
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-  width: 145px;
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-  float: left;
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-}
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-
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-.icon {
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-  width: 20px;
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-  margin-right: 4px;
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-  padding: 0px;
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-  float: right;
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-}
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-
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-.field {
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-  font-family: "Montserrat";
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-  font-size: 0.8rem;
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-  color: rgb(50, 50, 50);
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-}
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-
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-.description {
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-  font-family: "Montserrat";
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-  font-size: 0.9rem;
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-  padding-top: 15px;
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-}
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-
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-.description a, .field a, .name a {
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-  font-weight: bold;
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-  text-decoration: none;
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-}
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-</style>
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-
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 <table class="people">
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   <tr>
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     <td>
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@@ -142,8 +102,8 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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     <td>
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       <a id="hellais"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/hellais.png" alt="hellais" /></div>
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-      <div class="icon"><a href="https://db.torproject.org/fetchkey.cgi?fingerprint=67EF3966509986E96ACEE84E5D67CD18702287F4"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/pgp-key.png" alt="pgp key" /></a></div>
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       <div class="icon"><a href="https://twitter.com/hellais"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/twitter-small.png" alt="twitter" /></a></div>
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+      <div class="icon"><a href="https://db.torproject.org/fetchkey.cgi?fingerprint=67EF3966509986E96ACEE84E5D67CD18702287F4"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/pgp-key.png" alt="pgp key" /></a></div>
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       <div class="name"><a href="#hellais">Arturo Filastò</a></div>
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> hellais</div>
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       <div class="description">Project leader for <a href="https://ooni.torproject.org/">OONI</a>, has helped with <a href="http://tor2web.org/">tor2web</a>, wrote <a href="https://atlas.torproject.org/">Atlas</a>, and helps improve security.</div>
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@@ -373,6 +333,18 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="description">Speaks Java and other languages, streamlines build processes, and scrutinizes mathematical concepts behind aggregating tons of Tor network data.</div>
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     </td>
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+    <td>
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+      <a id="redshiftzero"></a>
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+      <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/redshiftzero.png" alt="redshiftzero" /></div>
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+      <div class="icon"><a href="https://twitter.com/redshiftzero"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/twitter-small.png" alt="twitter" /></a></div>
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+      <div class="icon"><a href="../keys/redshiftzero.txt"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/pgp-key.png" alt="pgp key" /></a></div>
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+      <div class="name"><a href="#redshiftzero">Jennifer Helsby</a></div>
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+      <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> redshiftzero</div>
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+      <div class="description">Lead developer of the <a href="https://securedrop.org/">SecureDrop</a> whistleblower platform based at the <a href="https://freedom.press/">Freedom of the Press Foundation</a>.</div>
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+    </td>
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+  </tr>
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+
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+  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="qbi"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
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@@ -382,9 +354,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> qbi</div>
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       <div class="description">Volunteer that helped translate the website, is part of TorServers.net, and Tor's sysadmin team.</div>
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     </td>
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-  </tr>
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-  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="jselon"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/jselon.png" alt="jselon" /></div>
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@@ -393,7 +363,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> jselon</div>
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       <div class="description">Event Coordination, donor management, general office operations.</div>
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     </td>
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+  </tr>
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+  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="julius"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
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       <div class="name"><a href="#julius">Julius Mittenzwei</a></div>
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       <div class="description">Germany-based lawyer and Internet activist.</div>
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     </td>
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-  </tr>
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-  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="juris"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> juris</div>
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       <div class="description">Board member of torservers.net.</div>
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     </td>
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+  </tr>
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+  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="karsten"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/karsten.png" alt="karsten" /></div>
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> karsten</div>
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       <div class="description">Primary researcher and developer into <a href="https://metrics.torproject.org/">anonymous metrics</a> which started as a National Science Foundation grant.</div>
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     </td>
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-  </tr>
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-  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="kat5"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/kat5.png" alt="kat5" /></div>
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> kat5</div>
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       <div class="description">Volunteer on the Community Team. Helps with t-shirts for relay operators and other odds and ends.</div>
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     </td>
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+  </tr>
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+  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="ailanthus"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/ailanthus.png" alt="ailanthus" /></div>
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@@ -442,16 +414,16 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> ailanthus</div>
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       <div class="description">Writes about Tor in mainstream and technical publications and conducts community workshops to teach people about Tor.</div>
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     </td>
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-  </tr>
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-  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="leif"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
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       <div class="name"><a href="#leif">Leif Ryge</a></div>
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       <div class="description">Works on security analysis, designer of &quot;bananaphone&quot; transport.</div>
453 423
     </td>
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+  </tr>
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+  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="linda"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/linda.png" alt="linda" /></div>
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@@ -460,9 +432,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> linda</div>
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       <div class="description">UX team lead.</div>
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     </td>
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-  </tr>
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-  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="ln5"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/ln5.png" alt="ln5" /></div>
... ...
@@ -472,7 +442,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> ln5</div>
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       <div class="description">Swedish advocate and Tor Board member. Works on implementing IPv6 in Tor, build automation, and runs a directory authority.</div>
474 444
     </td>
445
+  </tr>
475 446
 
447
+  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="agrabeli"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/agrabeli.png" alt="agrabeli" /></div>
... ...
@@ -482,9 +454,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> agrabeli</div>
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       <div class="description">Maria manages OONI's Partnership Program and writes research reports on internet censorship around the world.</div>
484 456
     </td>
485
-  </tr>
486 457
 
487
-  <tr>
488 458
     <td>
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       <a id="mcs"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/mcs.png" alt="mcs" /></div>
... ...
@@ -493,7 +463,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> mcs</div>
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       <div class="description">Developer on the Tor Browser team.</div>
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     </td>
466
+  </tr>
496 467
 
468
+  <tr>
497 469
     <td>
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       <a id="matt"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
... ...
@@ -501,9 +473,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
501 473
       <div class="name"><a href="#matt">Matt Blaze</a></div>
502 474
       <div class="description">Chairs the Tor Board of Directors. Professor at the University of Pennsylvania where he researches security, privacy, and anonymity.</div>
503 475
     </td>
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-  </tr>
505 476
 
506
-  <tr>
507 477
     <td>
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       <a id="pastly"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/pastly.png" alt="pastly" /></div>
... ...
@@ -512,7 +482,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> pastly</div>
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       <div class="description"><a href="http://mattttttssi4lhud.onion/">Implemented</a> the <a href="http://www.robgjansen.com/publications/kist-sec2014.pdf">KIST scheduler</a> into Tor. Helps safely measure Tor. Says helpful things on IRC.</div>
514 484
     </td>
485
+  </tr>
515 486
 
487
+  <tr>
516 488
     <td>
517 489
       <a id="sysrqb"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
... ...
@@ -522,9 +494,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
522 494
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> sysrqb</div>
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       <div class="description">Worked on tor, torsocks, and many other projects. Helped maintain and develop BridgeDB.</div>
524 496
     </td>
525
-  </tr>
526 497
 
527
-  <tr>
528 498
     <td>
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       <a id="meejah"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/meejah.png" alt="meejah" /></div>
... ...
@@ -534,7 +504,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
534 504
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> meejah</div>
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       <div class="description"><a href="https://meejah.ca">Author</a> of <a href="https://github.com/meejah/txtorcon">txtorcon</a>, <a href="https://github.com/meejah/carml">carml</a> and other Tor Python tools including some for bad-relay hunting.</div>
536 506
     </td>
507
+  </tr>
537 508
 
509
+  <tr>
538 510
     <td>
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       <a id="mtigas"></a>
540 512
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/mtigas.png" alt="mtigas" /></div>
... ...
@@ -544,9 +516,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
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       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> mtigas</div>
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       <div class="description">Works on <a href="https://mike.tig.as/onionbrowser/">Onion Browser</a>, iOS, and hacker-journalist at <a href="https://www.propublica.org/">ProPublica</a> running their <a href="https://www.propub3r6espa33w.onion/">onion service</a>.</div>
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     </td>
547
-  </tr>
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-  <tr>
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     <td>
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       <a id="moritz"></a>
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       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/moritz.png" alt="moritz" /></div>
... ...
@@ -555,7 +525,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
555 525
       <div class="name"><a href="#moritz">Moritz Bartl</a></div>
556 526
       <div class="description">Co-founder of <a href="https://www.torservers.net/">torservers.net</a>, a network of non-profit organizations that run Tor exit relays.</div>
557 527
     </td>
528
+  </tr>
558 529
 
530
+  <tr>
559 531
     <td>
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       <a id="n8fr8"></a>
561 533
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/n8fr8.png" alt="n8fr8" /></div>
... ...
@@ -564,9 +536,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
564 536
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> n8fr8</div>
565 537
       <div class="description">Founder of the <a href="https://guardianproject.info/">Guardian Project</a>. Orbot lead developer and contributor to Orfox, Onion Browser and NetCipher SDK. Director of Technology at Tibet Action Institute.</div>
566 538
     </td>
567
-  </tr>
568 539
 
569
-  <tr>
570 540
     <td>
571 541
       <a id="nickhopper"></a>
572 542
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/nickhopper.png" alt="nickhopper" /></div>
... ...
@@ -574,7 +544,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
574 544
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> nickhopper</div>
575 545
       <div class="description"><a href="https://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~hopper/">Researcher</a> interested in improving Tor's performance and resistance to traffic analysis. Some of my work is described <a href="https://www-users.cs.umn.edu/~hopper/research.html">here</a>.</div>
576 546
     </td>
547
+  </tr>
577 548
 
549
+  <tr>
578 550
     <td>
579 551
       <a id="nickm"></a>
580 552
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/nickm.png" alt="nickm" /></div>
... ...
@@ -584,9 +556,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
584 556
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> nickm</div>
585 557
       <div class="description">One of the three original designers of Tor - does a lot of the ongoing design work, and coordinates and leads ongoing development.</div>
586 558
     </td>
587
-  </tr>
588 559
 
589
-  <tr>
590 560
     <td>
591 561
       <a id="boklm"></a>
592 562
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
... ...
@@ -595,7 +565,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
595 565
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> boklm</div>
596 566
       <div class="description">Works on Tor Browser.</div>
597 567
     </td>
568
+  </tr>
598 569
 
570
+  <tr>
599 571
     <td>
600 572
       <a id="mrphs"></a>
601 573
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
... ...
@@ -605,9 +577,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
605 577
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> mrphs</div>
606 578
       <div class="description">His main area of interests are End-users Accessibility/Security, UX, Censorship, Advocacy and Onion Services.</div>
607 579
     </td>
608
-  </tr>
609 580
 
610
-  <tr>
611 581
     <td>
612 582
       <a id="syverson"></a>
613 583
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/syverson.png" alt="syverson" /></div>
... ...
@@ -615,7 +585,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
615 585
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> syverson</div>
616 586
       <div class="description"><a href="https://www.nrl.navy.mil">NRL</a> researcher on most things Tor. Inventor of <a href="https://www.onion-router.net/">onion routing</a>, and one of the three original designers of Tor.</div>
617 587
     </td>
588
+  </tr>
618 589
 
590
+  <tr>
619 591
     <td>
620 592
       <a id="pepijn"></a>
621 593
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/pepijn.png" alt="pepijn" /></div>
... ...
@@ -624,16 +596,16 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
624 596
       <div class="name"><a href="#pepijn">Pepijn Le Heux</a></div>
625 597
       <div class="description">Lawyer based in The Netherlands and co-founder of Hart voor Internetvrijheid.</div>
626 598
     </td>
627
-  </tr>
628 599
 
629
-  <tr>
630 600
     <td>
631 601
       <a id="peter"></a>
632 602
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
633 603
       <div class="name"><a href="#peter">Peter Palfrader</a></div>
634 604
       <div class="description">Manages the Debian packages, runs one of the directory authorities, and generally helps out a lot.</div>
635 605
     </td>
606
+  </tr>
636 607
 
608
+  <tr>
637 609
     <td>
638 610
       <a id="phw"></a>
639 611
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
... ...
@@ -643,9 +615,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
643 615
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> phw</div>
644 616
       <div class="description">Maintains <a href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/user/phw/exitmap.git/">exitmap</a> and <a href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/user/phw/sybilhunter.git/">sybilhunter</a>, works on <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/ReportingBadRelays">bad relay detection</a>, and does <a href="https://nymity.ch/papers.html">security and privacy research</a>.</div>
645 617
     </td>
646
-  </tr>
647 618
 
648
-  <tr>
649 619
     <td>
650 620
       <a id="robt"></a>
651 621
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/robt.png" alt="robt" /></div>
... ...
@@ -653,7 +623,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
653 623
       <div class="name"><a href="#robt">Rabbi Rob Thomas</a></div>
654 624
       <div class="description">CEO of Team Cymru, which supports Tor through hosting, research, and infosec assistance.</div>
655 625
     </td>
626
+  </tr>
656 627
 
628
+  <tr>
657 629
     <td>
658 630
       <a id="ramy"></a>
659 631
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/ramy.png" alt="ramy" /></div>
... ...
@@ -662,9 +634,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
662 634
       <div class="name"><a href="#ramy">Ramy Raoof</a></div>
663 635
       <div class="description">Tor Board member, technologist, and privacy and security researcher.</div>
664 636
     </td>
665
-  </tr>
666 637
 
667
-  <tr>
668 638
     <td>
669 639
       <a id="pospeselr"></a>
670 640
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/no_photo.png" alt="no photo" /></div>
... ...
@@ -674,7 +644,9 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
674 644
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> pospeselr</div>
675 645
       <div class="description">Tor Browser developer.</div>
676 646
     </td>
647
+  </tr>
677 648
 
649
+  <tr>
678 650
     <td>
679 651
       <a id="robgjansen"></a>
680 652
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/robgjansen.png" alt="robgjansen" /></div>
... ...
@@ -684,9 +656,7 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
684 656
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> robgjansen</div>
685 657
       <div class="description"><a href="https://www.nrl.navy.mil">NRL</a> research scientist, <a href="http://www.robgjansen.com/">leading expert in Tor network performance</a>, and author of <a href="https://shadow.github.io/">Shadow</a>.</div>
686 658
     </td>
687
-  </tr>
688 659
 
689
-  <tr>
690 660
     <td>
691 661
       <a id="arma"></a>
692 662
       <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/arma.png" alt="arma" /></div>
... ...
@@ -696,13 +666,6 @@ table.people tr td:first-child {
696 666
       <div class="field"><b>IRC:</b> arma</div>
697 667
       <div class="description">Original developer of Tor along with Nick and Paul. Leading privacy researcher, coordinating developers and researchers.</div>
698 668
     </td>
699
-
700
-    <td>
701
-      <a id="roya"></a>
702
-      <div class="photo"><img src="$(IMGROOT)/people/roya.png" alt="roya" /></div>
703
-      <div class="name"><a href="#roya">Roya Ensafi</a></div>
704
-      <div class="description">Detects and understands how to manipulate and circumvent Tor network censorship attempts.</div>
705
-    </td>
706 669
   </tr>
707 670
 
708 671
   <tr>
... ...
@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@
204 204
     </p>
205 205
     
206 206
     <ul>
207
-      <li><h4><a href="https://ahmia.fi/gsoc/">Ahmia.fi - Search Engine for Hidden Services</a> by Juha Nurmi</h4></li>
207
+      <li><h4><a href="https://ahmia.fi/gsoc/">Ahmia.fi - Search Engine for Onion Services</a> by Juha Nurmi</h4></li>
208 208
       <li><h4><a href="http://ilv.github.io/gettor_proposal.html">Revamp GetTor</a> by Israel Leiva</h4></li>
209 209
       <li><h4><a href="https://sites.google.com/site/sreenathadev/gsoc-2014-weather-rewrite">Weather Rewrite</a> by Sreenatha Bhatlapenumarthi</h4></li>
210 210
       <li><h4><a href="http://kostas.mkj.lt/gsoc2014/gsoc2014.html">BridgeDB Distributor</a> by Kostas Jakeliunas</h4></li>
... ...
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@
46 46
     Individuals use Tor to keep websites from tracking them and their family
47 47
     members, or to connect to news sites, instant messaging services, or the
48 48
     like when these are blocked by their local Internet providers.  Tor's <a
49
-    href="<page docs/hidden-services>">hidden services</a>
49
+    href="<page docs/onion-services>">onion services</a>
50 50
     let users publish web sites and other services without needing to reveal
51 51
     the location of the site. Individuals also use Tor for socially sensitive
52 52
     communication: chat rooms and web forums for rape and abuse survivors,
... ...
@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@
57 57
     </li>
58 58
     <li><strong>They research sensitive topics.</strong>
59 59
     There's a wealth of information available online. But perhaps in your country, access to information on AIDS, birth control,
60
-    <a href="http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/china-news/tibetan-culture-website-shut-down-in-china-53327.html">Tibetan culture</a>,
60
+    <a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20120107130815/http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/china-news/tibetan-culture-website-shut-down-in-china-53327.html">Tibetan culture</a>,
61 61
     or world religions is behind a national firewall.
62 62
     </li>
63 63
 <li><strong>They skirt surveillance.</strong> Even harmless web browsing can sometimes raise red flags for suspicious observers. Using Tor protects your privacy by making it extremely dificult for an observer to correlate the sites you visit with your physical-world identity.
... ...
@@ -74,18 +74,15 @@
74 74
     tracks Internet prisoners of conscience and jailed or harmed journalists all over the world. They advise
75 75
     journalists, sources, bloggers, and dissidents to use Tor to ensure their privacy and safety.
76 76
     </li>
77
-    <li><strong>The US <a href="http://www.ibb.gov/">International Broadcasting Bureau</a></strong>
78
-    (Voice of America/Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Asia) supports Tor development to help Internet users in countries without
79
-    safe access to free media.  Tor preserves the ability of persons behind national firewalls or under
80
-    the surveillance of repressive regimes to obtain a global perspective on controversial topics including democracy,
81
-    economics and religion.
82
-    </li>
77
+	<li>Tor is part of <strong><a href="https://securedrop.org/">SecureDrop</a></strong>, an open-source whistleblower submission system that media organizations can use to securely accept documents from and communicate with anonymous sources. <a href="https://securedrop.org/directory">Many news organizations</a> use SecureDrop, including the Associated Press, The Washington Post, The New York Times, The CBC, ProPublica, Dagbladet, and more.
78
+	</li>
79
+	<li>Tor preserves the ability of people behind national firewalls or under the surveillance of repressive regimes to obtain a global perspective on controversial topics including democracy, economics and religion.
80
+	</li>
83 81
     <li><strong>Citizen journalists in China</strong> use Tor to write about
84 82
     local events to encourage social change and political reform.
85 83
     </li>
86
-    <li><strong>Citizens and journalists in <a
87
-    href="http://www.rsf.org/rubrique.php3?id_rubrique=554">Internet black
88
-    holes</a></strong> use Tor to research state propaganda and opposing
84
+    <li><strong>Citizens and journalists in Internet black
85
+    holes</strong> use Tor to research state propaganda and opposing
89 86
     viewpoints, to file stories with non-State controlled media, and to
90 87
     avoid risking the personal consequences of intellectual curiosity.
91 88
     </li>
... ...
@@ -180,7 +177,7 @@
180 177
     <li>
181 178
     Tor can help activists avoid government or corporate censorship that hinders organization.
182 179
     In one such case, a
183
-    <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2005/07/24/telus-sites050724.html">Canadian ISP blocked access to a union website used by their own employees</a>
180
+    <a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20071015142759/http://www.cbc.ca:80/canada/story/2005/07/24/telus-sites050724.html">Canadian ISP blocked access to a union website used by their own employees</a>
184 181
     to help organize a strike.
185 182
     </li>
186 183
     </ul>
... ...
@@ -257,7 +254,7 @@
257 254
     <hr>
258 255
     <ul>
259 256
     <li>Frequently we hear about bloggers who are
260
-    <a href="http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB112541909221726743-Kl4kLxv0wSbjqrkXg_DieY3c8lg_20050930.html">sued</a> or
257
+    <a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20060910122231/http://online.wsj.com/public/article/SB112541909221726743-Kl4kLxv0wSbjqrkXg_DieY3c8lg_20050930.html">sued</a> or
261 258
     <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/money/workplace/2005-06-14-worker-blogs-usat_x.htm">fired</a>
262 259
     for saying perfectly legal things online, in their blog.</li>
263 260
     <li>We recommend the <a href="http://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/legal">EFF Legal Guide for Bloggers</a>.</li>
... ...
@@ -280,17 +277,17 @@
280 277
     operations, as well as protecting themselves from physical harm.
281 278
     </li>
282 279
 
283
-    <li><strong>Hidden services:</strong>
284
-    When the Internet was designed by DARPA, its primary purpose was to be able to facilitate distributed, robust communications in case of
285
-    local strikes.  However, some functions must be centralized, such as command and control sites.  It's the nature of the Internet protocols to
286
-    reveal the geographic location of any server that is reachable online.  Tor's hidden services capacity allows military command and
287
-    control to be physically secure from discovery and takedown.
288
-    </li>
289
-    <li><strong>Intelligence gathering:</strong>
290
-    Military personnel need to use electronic resources run and monitored by insurgents. They do not want the webserver logs on an insurgent website
291
-    to record a military address, thereby revealing the surveillance.
292
-    </li>
293
-    </ul>
280
+    <li><strong>Onion services:</strong>
281
+	When the Internet was designed by DARPA, its primary purpose was to be able
282
+	to facilitate distributed, robust communications in case of local strikes.
283
+	However, some functions must be centralized, such as command and control
284
+	sites.  It's the nature of the Internet protocols to reveal the geographic
285
+	location of any server that is reachable online.  Tor's onion services
286
+	capacity allows military command and control to be physically secure from
287
+	discovery and takedown.  </li> <li><strong>Intelligence gathering:</strong>
288
+	Military personnel need to use electronic resources run and monitored by
289
+	insurgents. They do not want the webserver logs on an insurgent website to
290
+	record a military address, thereby revealing the surveillance.  </li> </ul>
294 291
 
295 292
     <a name="itprofessionals"></a>
296 293
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#itprofessionals">IT Professionals use Tor</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -318,8 +315,8 @@
318 315
     <a href="http://www.edge.org/q2006/q06_4.html#kelly">con</a>, and <a
319 316
     href="http://web.mit.edu/gtmarx/www/anon.html">academic</a>) over anonymity. The Tor project is based on the belief that anonymity is not
320 317
     just a good idea some of the time &mdash; it is a requirement for a free and functioning society.  The <a href="http://www.eff.org/issues/anonymity">EFF maintains a good overview</a> of how anonymity was crucial to the founding of the United States.  Anonymity is recognized by US courts as a fundamental and important right. In fact, governments mandate anonymity in many cases themselves:
321
-    <a href="https://www.crimeline.co.za/">police tip lines</a>,
322
-    <a href="http://www.texasbar.com/Content/ContentGroups/Public_Information1/Legal_Resources_Consumer_Information/Family_Law1/Adoption_Options.htm#sect2">adoption services</a>,
318
+    <a href="https://www.crimeline.co.za/">police tip lines</a>, 
319
+    <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closed_adoption">some adoption services</a>,
323 320
     <a href="http://writ.news.findlaw.com/aronson/20020827.html">police officer identities</a>,
324 321
     and so forth. It would be impossible to rehash the entire anonymity debate here &mdash; it is too large an issue with too many nuances, and there
325 322
     are plenty of other places where this information can be found. We do have a <a href="<page docs/faq-abuse>">Tor abuse</a> page describing some of
326 323
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,40 @@
1
+table.people td {
2
+  vertical-align: top;
3
+  padding: 0px;
4
+  padding-bottom: 15px;
5
+  width: 50%;
6
+}
7
+
8
+table.people tr td:first-child {
9
+  padding-right: 10px;
10
+}
11
+
12
+.photo {
13
+  width: 145px;
14
+  float: left;
15
+}
16
+
17
+.icon {
18
+  width: 20px;
19
+  margin-right: 4px;
20
+  padding: 0px;
21
+  float: right;
22
+}
23
+
24
+.field {
25
+  font-family: "Montserrat";
26
+  font-size: 0.8rem;
27
+  color: rgb(50, 50, 50);
28
+}
29
+
30
+.description {
31
+  font-family: "Montserrat";
32
+  font-size: 0.9rem;
33
+  padding-top: 15px;
34
+}
35
+
36
+.description a, .field a, .name a { 
37
+  font-weight: bold;
38
+  text-decoration: none;
39
+}
40
+
... ...
@@ -353,14 +353,14 @@ using technology?</a></li>
353 353
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#RemoveContent">I want some content removed from a .onion address.</a></h3>
354 354
     <p>The Tor Project does not host, control, nor have the ability to
355 355
     discover the owner or location of a .onion address.  The .onion address is
356
-    an address from <a href="<page docs/hidden-services>">a hidden
357
-    service</a>.  The name you see ending in .onion is a hidden service descriptor.
356
+    an address from <a href="<page docs/onion-services>">an onion
357
+    service</a>.  The name you see ending in .onion is an onion service descriptor.
358 358
     It's an automatically generated name which can be located on any Tor
359
-    relay or client anywhere on the Internet.  Hidden services are designed
359
+    relay or client anywhere on the Internet.  Onion services are designed
360 360
     to protect both the user and service provider from discovering who they
361
-    are and where they are from.  The design of hidden services means the
361
+    are and where they are from.  The design of onion services means the
362 362
     owner and location of the .onion site is hidden even from us.</p>
363
-    <p>But remember that this doesn't mean that hidden services are
363
+    <p>But remember that this doesn't mean that onion services are
364 364
     invulnerable. Traditional police techniques can still be very effective
365 365
     against them, such as interviewing suspects, writing style analysis,
366 366
     technical analysis of the content itself, sting operations, keyboard taps,
... ...
@@ -191,11 +191,11 @@ relay.</a></li>
191 191
     run my own?</a></li>
192 192
     </ul>
193 193
 
194
-    <p>Tor hidden services:</p>
194
+    <p>Tor onion services:</p>
195 195
 
196 196
     <ul>
197
-    <li><a href="#AccessHiddenServices">How do I access hidden services?</a></li>
198
-    <li><a href="#ProvideAHiddenService">How do I provide a hidden service?</a></li>
197
+    <li><a href="#AccessOnionServices">How do I access onion services?</a></li>
198
+    <li><a href="#ProvideAnOnionService">How do I provide an onion service?</a></li>
199 199
     </ul>
200 200
 
201 201
     <p>Development:</p>
... ...
@@ -682,15 +682,12 @@ with more funding?</a></h3>
682 682
 
683 683
     <p>
684 684
     The Tor network's <a
685
-
686
-href="https://metrics.torproject.org/network.html#networksize">several
687
-    thousand</a> relays push <a
688
-    href="https://metrics.torproject.org/network.html#bandwidth">over
689
-    7.5GB per second on average</a>. We have <a
690
-
691
-href="https://metrics.torproject.org/users.html#direct-users">millions of
692
-    daily users</a>. But the Tor network is not yet
693
-    self-sustaining.
685
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/networksize.html">several thousand</a>
686
+    relays push <a
687
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/bandwidth.html">around 100 Gbps on
688
+average</a>. We have <a
689
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/userstats-relay-country.html">millions of
690
+    daily users</a>. But the Tor network is not yet self-sustaining.
694 691
     </p>
695 692
 
696 693
     <p>
... ...
@@ -1817,7 +1814,7 @@ versions.
1817 1814
     <p>
1818 1815
     Note also that not every circuit is used to deliver traffic outside of
1819 1816
     the Tor network. It is normal to see non-exit circuits (such as those
1820
-    used to connect to hidden services, those that do directory fetches,
1817
+    used to connect to onion services, those that do directory fetches,
1821 1818
     those used for relay reachability self-tests, and so on) that end at
1822 1819
     a non-exit node. To keep a node from being used entirely, see
1823 1820
     <tt>ExcludeNodes</tt> and <tt>StrictNodes</tt> in the
... ...
@@ -3001,15 +2998,16 @@ diversity,
3001 2998
 
3002 2999
     <hr>
3003 3000
 
3004
-<a id="TorHiddenServices"></a>
3005
-<h2><a class="anchor">Tor hidden services:</a></h2>
3001
+# Leaving in old ids to accomodate incoming links.
3002
+<a id="TorOnionServices"></a><a id="TorHiddenServices"></a>
3003
+<h2><a class="anchor">Tor onion services:</a></h2>
3006 3004
 
3007
-    <a id="AccessHiddenServices"></a>
3008
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AccessHiddenServices">How do I access
3009
-    hidden services?</a></h3>
3005
+    <a id="AccessOnionServices"></a><a id="AccessHiddenServices"></a>
3006
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AccessOnionServices">How do I access
3007
+    onion services?</a></h3>
3010 3008
 
3011 3009
     <p>
3012
-    Tor hidden services are named with a special top-level domain (TLD)
3010
+    Tor onion services are named with a special top-level domain (TLD)
3013 3011
     name in DNS: .onion. Since the .onion TLD is not recognized by the
3014 3012
     official root DNS servers on the Internet, your application will not
3015 3013
     get the response it needs to locate the service. Currently, the Tor
... ...
@@ -3020,7 +3018,7 @@ diversity,
3020 3018
 <p>
3021 3019
  Therefore, your application <b>needs</b> to pass the .onion hostname to
3022 3020
  Tor directly. You can't try to resolve it to an IP address, since there
3023
- <i>is</i> no corresponding IP address: the server is hidden, after all!
3021
+ <i>is</i> no corresponding IP address.
3024 3022
 </p>
3025 3023
 
3026 3024
     <p>
... ...
@@ -3044,10 +3042,10 @@ diversity,
3044 3042
     <p>
3045 3043
     For applications that do not support HTTP proxy, and so cannot use
3046 3044
     Polipo, <a href="http://www.freecap.ru/eng/">FreeCap</a> is an
3047
-    alternative. When using FreeCap set proxy protocol  to SOCKS 5 and under
3045
+    alternative. When using FreeCap set proxy protocol to SOCKS 5 and under
3048 3046
     settings set DNS name resolving to remote. This
3049 3047
     will allow you to use almost any program with Tor without leaking DNS
3050
-    lookups and allow those same programs to access hidden services.
3048
+    lookups and allow those same programs to access onion services.
3051 3049
     </p>
3052 3050
 
3053 3051
     <p>
... ...
@@ -3056,13 +3054,13 @@ diversity,
3056 3054
 
3057 3055
     <hr>
3058 3056
 
3059
-    <a id="ProvideAHiddenService"></a>
3060
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ProvideAHiddenService">How do I provide a
3061
-    hidden service?</a></h3>
3057
+    <a id="ProvideAnOnionService"></a><a id="ProvideAHiddenService"></a>
3058
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ProvideAnOnionService">How do I provide an
3059
+    onion service?</a></h3>
3062 3060
 
3063 3061
     <p>
3064
-    See the <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">
3065
-    official hidden service configuration instructions</a>.
3062
+    See the <a href="<page docs/tor-onion-service>">
3063
+    official onion service configuration instructions</a>.
3066 3064
     </p>
3067 3065
 
3068 3066
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -3951,7 +3949,7 @@ and clients need to predict all the packets they will want to send in
3951 3949
 a session before picking their exit node!
3952 3950
 </li>
3953 3951
 <li>The Tor-internal name spaces would need to be redesigned. We support
3954
-hidden service ".onion" addresses by intercepting the addresses when
3952
+onion service ".onion" addresses by intercepting the addresses when
3955 3953
 they are passed to the Tor client. Doing so at the IP level will require
3956 3954
 a more complex interface between Tor and the local DNS resolver.
3957 3955
 </li>
... ...
@@ -4002,7 +4000,7 @@ their path length.</a></h3>
4002 4000
 <p>
4003 4001
  Right now the path length is hard-coded at 3 plus the number of nodes in
4004 4002
  your path that are sensitive. That is, in normal cases it's 3, but for
4005
- example if you're accessing a hidden service or a ".exit" address it could be 4.
4003
+ example if you're accessing an onion service or a ".exit" address it could be 4.
4006 4004
 </p>
4007 4005
 <p>
4008 4006
  We don't want to encourage people to use paths longer than this &mdash; it
... ...
@@ -1,165 +1,7 @@
1 1
 ## translation metadata
2 2
 # Revision: $Revision$
3
-# Translation-Priority: 3-low
3
+# Status: obsolete
4 4
 
5
-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor: Hidden Service Protocol" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
-  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
10
-    <a href="<page docs/hidden-services>">Hidden Services</a>
11
-  </div>
12
-  <div id="maincol">
13
-    <h2>Tor: Hidden Service Protocol</h2>
14
-    <hr>
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Redirecting" REDIRECT="docs/onion-services"
15 6
 
16
-    <p>
17
-    Tor makes it possible for users to hide their locations while offering
18
-    various kinds of services, such as web publishing or an instant
19
-    messaging server.  Using Tor "rendezvous points," other Tor users can
20
-    connect to these hidden services, each without knowing the other's
21
-    network identity. This page describes the technical details of how
22
-    this rendezvous protocol works. For a more direct how-to, see our <a
23
-    href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">configuring hidden services</a>
24
-    page.
25
-    </p>
26
-
27
-    <p>
28
-    A hidden service needs to advertise its existence in the Tor network before
29
-    clients will be able to contact it. Therefore, the service randomly picks
30
-    some relays, builds circuits to them, and asks them to act as
31
-    <em>introduction points</em> by telling them its public key. Note
32
-    that in the following figures the green links are circuits rather
33
-    than direct connections. By using a full Tor circuit, it's hard for
34
-    anyone to associate an introduction point with the hidden server's IP
35
-    address. While the introduction points and others are told the hidden
36
-    service's identity (public key), we don't want them to learn about the
37
-    hidden server's location (IP address).
38
-    </p>
39
-
40
-    <img alt="Tor hidden service step one" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-1.png">
41
-    # maybe add a speech bubble containing "PK" to Bob, because that's what
42
-    # Bob tells to his introduction points
43
-
44
-    <p>
45
-    Step two: the hidden service assembles a <em>hidden service
46
-    descriptor</em>, containing its public key and a summary of each
47
-    introduction point, and signs this descriptor with its private key.
48
-    It uploads that descriptor to a distributed hash table. The descriptor will be
49
-    found by clients requesting XYZ.onion where XYZ is a 16 character
50
-    name derived from the service's public key. After
51
-    this step, the hidden service is set up.
52
-    </p>
53
-
54
-    <p>
55
-    Although it might seem impractical to use an automatically-generated
56
-    service name, it serves an important goal: Everyone &ndash; including
57
-    the introduction points, the distributed hash table directory, and of course the
58
-    clients &ndash; can verify that they are talking to the right hidden
59
-    service. See also <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zooko%27s_triangle">Zooko's
60
-    conjecture</a> that out of Decentralized, Secure, and Human-Meaningful,
61
-    you can achieve at most two. Perhaps one day somebody will implement a <a
62
-    href="http://www.skyhunter.com/marcs/petnames/IntroPetNames.html">Petname</a>
63
-    design for hidden service names?
64
-    </p>
65
-
66
-    <img alt="Tor hidden service step two" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-2.png">
67
-    # maybe replace "database" with "DHT"; further: how incorrect
68
-    # is it to *not* add DB to the Tor cloud, now that begin dir cells are in
69
-    # use?
70
-
71
-    <p>
72
-    Step three: A client that wants to contact a hidden service needs
73
-    to learn about its onion address first. After that, the client can
74
-    initiate connection establishment by downloading the descriptor from
75
-    the distributed hash table. If there is a descriptor for XYZ.onion
76
-    (the hidden service could also be offline or have left long ago,
77
-    or there could be a typo in the onion address), the client now
78
-    knows the set of introduction points and the right public key to
79
-    use. Around this time, the client also creates a circuit to another
80
-    randomly picked relay and asks it to act as <em>rendezvous point</em>
81
-    by telling it a one-time secret.
82
-    </p>
83
-
84
-    <img alt="Tor hidden service step three" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-3.png">
85
-    # maybe add "cookie" to speech bubble, separated from the surrounded
86
-    # "IP1-3" and "PK"
87
-
88
-    <p>
89
-    Step four: When the descriptor is present and the rendezvous
90
-    point is ready, the client assembles an <em>introduce</em> message
91
-    (encrypted to the hidden service's public key) including the address
92
-    of the rendezvous point and the one-time secret. The client sends
93
-    this message to one of the introduction points, requesting it be
94
-    delivered to the hidden service. Again, communication takes place
95
-    via a Tor circuit: nobody can relate sending the introduce message
96
-    to the client's IP address, so the client remains anonymous.
97
-    </p>
98
-
99
-    <img alt="Tor hidden service step four" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-4.png">
100
-
101
-    <p>
102
-    Step five: The hidden service decrypts the client's introduce message
103
-    and finds the address of the rendezvous point and the one-time secret
104
-    in it. The service creates a circuit to the rendezvous point and
105
-    sends the one-time secret to it in a rendezvous message.
106
-    </p>
107
-
108
-    <p>
109
-    At this point it is of special importance that the hidden service sticks to
110
-    the same set of <a
111
-    href="<wikifaq>#Whatsthisaboutentryguardformerlyknownashelpernodes">entry
112
-    guards</a> when creating new circuits. Otherwise an attacker
113
-    could run his own relay and force a hidden service to create an arbitrary
114
-    number of circuits in the hope that the corrupt relay is picked as entry
115
-    node and he learns the hidden server's IP address via timing analysis. This
116
-    attack was described by &Oslash;verlier and Syverson in their paper titled
117
-    <a href="http://freehaven.net/anonbib/#hs-attack06">Locating Hidden
118
-    Servers</a>.
119
-    </p>
120
-
121
-    <img alt="Tor hidden service step five" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-5.png">
122
-    # it should say "Bob connects to Alice's ..."
123
-
124
-    <p>
125
-    In the last step, the rendezvous point notifies the client about successful
126
-    connection establishment. After that, both client and hidden service can
127
-    use their circuits to the rendezvous point for communicating with each
128
-    other. The rendezvous point simply relays (end-to-end encrypted) messages
129
-    from client to service and vice versa.
130
-    </p>
131
-
132
-    <p>
133
-    One of the reasons for not using the introduction circuit
134
-    for actual communication is that no single relay should
135
-    appear to be responsible for a given hidden service. This is why the
136
-    rendezvous point never learns about the hidden service's identity.
137
-    </p>
138
-
139
-    <p>
140
-    In general, the complete connection between client and hidden service
141
-    consists of 6 relays: 3 of them were picked by the client with the third
142
-    being the rendezvous point and the other 3 were picked by the hidden
143
-    service.
144
-    </p>
145
-
146
-    <img alt="Tor hidden service step six" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-6.png">
147
-
148
-    <p>
149
-    There are more detailed descriptions about the hidden service protocol than
150
-    this one. See the
151
-    <a href="<svnprojects>design-paper/tor-design.pdf">Tor design paper</a>
152
-    for an in-depth design description and the
153
-    <a href="<specblob>rend-spec.txt">rendezvous specification</a>
154
-    for the message formats.
155
-    </p>
156
-  </div>
157
-  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
158
-  <div id = "sidecol">
159
-#include "side.wmi"
160
-#include "info.wmi"
161
-  </div>
162
-  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
163
-</div>
164
-<!-- END CONTENT -->
165 7
 #include <foot.wmi>
166 8
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,162 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision$
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor: Onion Service Protocol" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page docs/onion-services>">Onion Services</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <h2>Tor: Onion Service Protocol</h2>
14
+    <hr>
15
+
16
+    <p>
17
+    Tor makes it possible for users to hide their locations while offering
18
+    various kinds of services, such as web publishing or an instant
19
+    messaging server.  Using Tor "rendezvous points," other Tor users can
20
+	connect to these onion services, formerly known as hidden services, each
21
+	without knowing the other's network identity. This page describes the
22
+	technical details of how this rendezvous protocol works. For a more direct
23
+	how-to, see our <a href="<page docs/tor-onion-service>">configuring onion
24
+	services</a> page.  </p>
25
+
26
+    <p>
27
+    An onion service needs to advertise its existence in the Tor network before
28
+    clients will be able to contact it. Therefore, the service randomly picks
29
+    some relays, builds circuits to them, and asks them to act as
30
+    <em>introduction points</em> by telling them its public key. Note
31
+    that in the following figures the green links are circuits rather
32
+    than direct connections. By using a full Tor circuit, it's hard for
33
+    anyone to associate an introduction point with the onion server's IP
34
+    address. While the introduction points and others are told the onion
35
+    service's identity (public key), we don't want them to learn about the
36
+    onion server's location (IP address).
37
+    </p>
38
+
39
+    <img alt="Tor onion service step one" src="$(IMGROOT)/tor-onion-services-1.png">
40
+    # maybe add a speech bubble containing "PK" to Bob, because that's what
41
+    # Bob tells to his introduction points
42
+
43
+    <p>
44
+	Step two: the onion service assembles an <em>onion service descriptor</em>,
45
+	containing its public key and a summary of each introduction point, and
46
+	signs this descriptor with its private key.  It uploads that descriptor to
47
+	a distributed hash table.  The descriptor will be found by clients
48
+	requesting XYZ.onion where XYZ is a 16 character name derived from the
49
+	service's public key. After this step, the onion service is set up.  </p>
50
+
51
+    <p>
52
+    Although it might seem impractical to use an automatically-generated
53
+    service name, it serves an important goal: Everyone &ndash; including
54
+	the introduction points, the distributed hash table directory, and of
55
+	course the clients &ndash; can verify that they are talking to the right
56
+	onion service. See also <a
57
+	href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zooko%27s_triangle">Zooko's
58
+	conjecture</a> that out of Decentralized, Secure, and Human-Meaningful, you
59
+	can achieve at most two. Perhaps one day somebody will implement a <a
60
+	href="http://www.skyhunter.com/marcs/petnames/IntroPetNames.html">Petname</a>
61
+	design for onion service names?  </p>
62
+
63
+    <img alt="Tor onion service step two" src="$(IMGROOT)/tor-onion-services-2.png">
64
+    # maybe replace "database" with "DHT"; further: how incorrect
65
+    # is it to *not* add DB to the Tor cloud, now that begin dir cells are in
66
+    # use?
67
+
68
+    <p>
69
+    Step three: A client that wants to contact an onion service needs
70
+    to learn about its onion address first. After that, the client can
71
+    initiate connection establishment by downloading the descriptor from
72
+    the distributed hash table. If there is a descriptor for XYZ.onion
73
+    (the onion service could also be offline or have left long ago,
74
+    or there could be a typo in the onion address), the client now
75
+    knows the set of introduction points and the right public key to
76
+    use. Around this time, the client also creates a circuit to another
77
+    randomly picked relay and asks it to act as <em>rendezvous point</em>
78
+    by telling it a one-time secret.
79
+    </p>
80
+
81
+    <img alt="Tor onion service step three" src="$(IMGROOT)/tor-onion-services-3.png">
82
+    # maybe add "cookie" to speech bubble, separated from the surrounded
83
+    # "IP1-3" and "PK"
84
+
85
+    <p>
86
+    Step four: When the descriptor is present and the rendezvous
87
+    point is ready, the client assembles an <em>introduce</em> message
88
+    (encrypted to the onion service's public key) including the address
89
+    of the rendezvous point and the one-time secret. The client sends
90
+    this message to one of the introduction points, requesting it be
91
+    delivered to the onion service. Again, communication takes place
92
+    via a Tor circuit: nobody can relate sending the introduce message
93
+    to the client's IP address, so the client remains anonymous.
94
+    </p>
95
+
96
+    <img alt="Tor onion service step four" src="$(IMGROOT)/tor-onion-services-4.png">
97
+
98
+    <p>
99
+    Step five: The onion service decrypts the client's introduce message
100
+    and finds the address of the rendezvous point and the one-time secret
101
+    in it. The service creates a circuit to the rendezvous point and
102
+    sends the one-time secret to it in a rendezvous message.
103
+    </p>
104
+
105
+    <p>
106
+    At this point it is of special importance that the onion service sticks to
107
+    the same set of <a
108
+    href="<wikifaq>#Whatsthisaboutentryguardformerlyknownashelpernodes">entry
109
+    guards</a> when creating new circuits. Otherwise an attacker
110
+    could run his own relay and force an onion service to create an arbitrary
111
+    number of circuits in the hope that the corrupt relay is picked as entry
112
+    node and he learns the onion server's IP address via timing analysis. This
113
+    attack was described by &Oslash;verlier and Syverson in their paper titled
114
+    <a href="http://freehaven.net/anonbib/#hs-attack06">Locating Hidden
115
+    Servers</a>.
116
+    </p>
117
+
118
+    <img alt="Tor onion service step five" src="$(IMGROOT)/tor-onion-services-5.png">
119
+    # it should say "Bob connects to Alice's ..."
120
+
121
+    <p>
122
+    In the last step, the rendezvous point notifies the client about successful
123
+    connection establishment. After that, both client and onion service can
124
+    use their circuits to the rendezvous point for communicating with each
125
+    other. The rendezvous point simply relays (end-to-end encrypted) messages
126
+    from client to service and vice versa.
127
+    </p>
128
+
129
+    <p>
130
+    One of the reasons for not using the introduction circuit
131
+    for actual communication is that no single relay should
132
+    appear to be responsible for a given onion service. This is why the
133
+    rendezvous point never learns about the onion service's identity.
134
+    </p>
135
+
136
+    <p>
137
+    In general, the complete connection between client and onion service
138
+    consists of 6 relays: 3 of them were picked by the client with the third
139
+    being the rendezvous point and the other 3 were picked by the onion
140
+    service.
141
+    </p>
142
+
143
+    <img alt="Tor onion service step six" src="$(IMGROOT)/tor-onion-services-6.png">
144
+
145
+    <p>
146
+    There are more detailed descriptions about the onion service protocol than
147
+    this one. See the
148
+    <a href="<svnprojects>design-paper/tor-design.pdf">Tor design paper</a>
149
+    for an in-depth design description and the
150
+    <a href="<specblob>rend-spec.txt">rendezvous specification</a>
151
+    for the message formats.
152
+    </p>
153
+  </div>
154
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
155
+  <div id = "sidecol">
156
+#include "side.wmi"
157
+#include "info.wmi"
158
+  </div>
159
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
160
+</div>
161
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
162
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -51,8 +51,8 @@
51 51
           {'url'  => 'docs/tor-doc-relay',
52 52
            'txt'  => 'Configuring a Relay graphically',
53 53
           },
54
-          {'url'  => 'docs/tor-hidden-service',
55
-           'txt'  => 'Configuring a Hidden Service',
54
+          {'url'  => 'docs/tor-onion-service',
55
+           'txt'  => 'Configuring an Onion Service',
56 56
           },
57 57
           {'url'  => 'docs/bridges',
58 58
            'txt'  => 'Understanding bridges',
... ...
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@
22 22
     <p>Even though Tor Browser comes with a regular Tor, it will only run
23 23
     as long as you keep Tor Browser open. The following instructions will
24 24
     set up Tor without graphical interface or a browser. Many people prefer
25
-    this over TBB when they host hidden services or relay traffic for other Tor
25
+    this over TBB when they host onion services or relay traffic for other Tor
26 26
     users.  <hr>
27 27
     <a id="installing"></a>
28 28
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#installing">Step One: Install a package manager</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -1,261 +1,7 @@
1 1
 ## translation metadata
2 2
 # Revision: $Revision$
3
-# Translation-Priority: 3-low
3
+# Status: obsolete
4 4
 
5
-#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Hidden Service Configuration Instructions" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
-<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
-  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
-    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
-    <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
10
-    <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">Tor Hidden Service</a>
11
-  </div>
12
-  <div id="maincol">
13
-    <h1>Configuring Hidden Services for <a href="<page index>">Tor</a></h1>
14
-    <hr>
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Redirecting" REDIRECT="docs/tor-onion-service"
15 6
 
16
-    <p>Tor allows clients and relays to offer hidden services. That is,
17
-    you can offer a web server, SSH server, etc., without revealing your
18
-    IP address to its users. In fact, because you don't use any public address,
19
-    you can run a hidden service from behind your firewall.
20
-    </p>
21
-
22
-    <p>If you have Tor installed, you can see hidden services in action
23
-    by visiting this <a href="http://duskgytldkxiuqc6.onion/">sample
24
-    site</a>.
25
-    </p>
26
-
27
-    <p>
28
-    This page describes the steps for setting up your own hidden service
29
-    website. For the technical details of how the hidden service protocol
30
-    works, see our <a href="<page docs/hidden-services>">hidden service
31
-    protocol</a> page.
32
-    </p>
33
-
34
-    <hr>
35
-    <a id="zero"></a>
36
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#zero">Step Zero: Get Tor working</a></h2>
37
-    <br>
38
-
39
-    <p>Before you start, you need to make sure:</p>
40
-    <ol>
41
-    <li>Tor is up and running,</li>
42
-    <li>You actually set it up correctly.</li>
43
-    </ol>
44
-
45
-    <p>Windows users should follow the <a
46
-    href="<page docs/tor-doc-windows>">Windows
47
-    howto</a>, OS X users should follow the <a
48
-    href="<page docs/tor-doc-osx>">OS
49
-    X howto</a>, and Linux/BSD/Unix users should follow the <a
50
-    href="<page docs/tor-doc-unix>">Unix howto</a>.
51
-    </p>
52
-
53
-    <hr>
54
-    <a id="one"></a>
55
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#one">Step One: Install a web server locally</a></h2>
56
-    <br>
57
-
58
-    <p>
59
-    First, you need to set up a web server locally. Setting up a web
60
-    server can be complex. We're not going to cover how to setup a web
61
-    server here. If you get stuck or want to do more, find a friend who
62
-    can help you. We recommend you install a new separate web server for
63
-    your hidden service, since even if you already have one installed,
64
-    you may be using it (or want to use it later) for a normal website.
65
-    </p>
66
-
67
-    <p>
68
-    You need to configure your web server so it doesn't give away any
69
-    information about you, your computer, or your location. Be sure to
70
-    bind the web server only to localhost (if people could get to it
71
-    directly, they could confirm that your computer is the one offering
72
-    the hidden service). Be sure that its error messages don't list
73
-    your hostname or other hints. Consider putting the web server in a
74
-    sandbox or VM to limit the damage from code vulnerabilities.
75
-    </p>
76
-
77
-    <p>
78
-    Once your web server is set up, make
79
-    sure it works: open your browser and go to <a
80
-    href="http://localhost:8080/">http://localhost:8080/</a>, where
81
-    8080 is the webserver port you chose during setup (you can choose any
82
-    port, 8080 is just an example). Then try putting a file in the main
83
-    html directory, and make sure it shows up when you access the site.
84
-    </p>
85
-
86
-    <hr>
87
-    <a id="two"></a>
88
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#two">Step Two: Configure your hidden service</a></h2>
89
-    <br>
90
-
91
-    <p>Next, you need to configure your hidden service to point to your
92
-    local web server.
93
-    </p>
94
-
95
-    <p>First, open your torrc file in your favorite text editor. (See
96
-    <a href="<page docs/faq>#torrc">the torrc FAQ entry</a> to learn
97
-    what this means.) Go to the middle section and look for the line</p>
98
-
99
-    <pre>
100
-    \############### This section is just for location-hidden services ###
101
-    </pre>
102
-
103
-    <p>
104
-    This section of the file consists of groups of lines, each representing
105
-    one hidden service. Right now they are all commented out (the lines
106
-    start with #), so hidden services are disabled. Each group of lines
107
-    consists of one <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line, and one or more
108
-    <var>HiddenServicePort</var> lines:</p>
109
-    <ul>
110
-    <li><var>HiddenServiceDir</var> is a directory where Tor will store information
111
-    about that hidden service.  In particular, Tor will create a file here named
112
-    <var>hostname</var> which will tell you the onion URL.  You don't need to
113
-    add any files to this directory. Make sure this is not the same directory
114
-    as the hidserv directory you created when setting up thttpd, as your
115
-    HiddenServiceDir contains secret information!</li>
116
-    <li><var>HiddenServicePort</var> lets you specify a virtual port (that is, what
117
-    port people accessing the hidden service will think they're using) and an
118
-    IP address and port for redirecting connections to this virtual port.</li>
119
-    </ul>
120
-
121
-    <p>Add the following lines to your torrc:
122
-    </p>
123
-
124
-    <pre>
125
-    HiddenServiceDir /Library/Tor/var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
126
-    HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080
127
-    </pre>
128
-
129
-    <p>You're going to want to change the <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line, so it points
130
-    to an actual directory that is readable/writeable by the user that will
131
-    be running Tor. The above line should work if you're using the OS X Tor
132
-    package. On Unix, try "/home/username/hidden_service/" and fill in your own
133
-    username in place of "username". On Windows you might pick:</p>
134
-    <pre>
135
-    HiddenServiceDir C:\Users\username\Documents\tor\hidden_service
136
-    HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080
137
-    </pre>
138
-
139
-    <p>Note that since 0.2.6, both <var>SocksPort</var> and <var>HiddenServicePort</var> support Unix socket. 
140
-    This means that you can point the <var>HiddenServicePort</var> to a Unix socket:</p>
141
-    <pre>
142
-    HiddenServiceDir /Library/Tor/var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
143
-    HiddenServicePort 80 unix:/path/to/socket
144
-    </pre>
145
-
146
-    <p>Now save the torrc and restart your tor.</p>
147
-
148
-    <p>If Tor starts up again, great. Otherwise, something is wrong. First look at
149
-    your logfiles for hints. It will print some warnings or error messages. That
150
-    should give you an idea what went wrong. Typically there are typos in the torrc
151
-    or wrong directory permissions (See <a href="<page docs/faq>#Logs">the
152
-    logging FAQ entry</a> if you don't know how to enable or find your
153
-    log file.)
154
-    </p>
155
-
156
-    <p>When Tor starts, it will automatically create the <var>HiddenServiceDir</var>
157
-    that you specified (if necessary), and it will create two files there.</p>
158
-
159
-    <dl>
160
-    <dt><var>private_key</var></dt>
161
-    <dd>First, Tor will generate a new public/private keypair for your hidden
162
-    service. It is written into a file called "private_key". Don't share this key
163
-    with others -- if you do they will be able to impersonate your hidden
164
-    service.</dd>
165
-    <dt><var>hostname</var></dt>
166
-    <dd>The other file Tor will create is called "hostname". This contains
167
-    a short summary of your public key -- it will look something like
168
-    <tt>duskgytldkxiuqc6.onion</tt>. This is the public name for your service,
169
-    and you can tell it to people, publish it on websites, put it on business
170
-    cards, etc.</dd>
171
-    </dl>
172
-
173
-    <p>If Tor runs as a different user than you, for example on
174
-    OS X, Debian, or Red Hat, then you may need to become root to be able
175
-    to view these files.</p>
176
-
177
-    <p>Now that you've restarted Tor, it is busy picking introduction points
178
-    in the Tor network, and generating a <em>hidden service
179
-    descriptor</em>. This is a signed list of introduction points along with
180
-    the service's full public key. It anonymously publishes this descriptor
181
-    to the directory servers, and other people anonymously fetch it from the
182
-    directory servers when they're trying to access your service.
183
-    </p>
184
-
185
-    <p>Try it now: paste the contents of the hostname file into your web
186
-    browser. If it works, you'll get the html page you set up in step one.
187
-    If it doesn't work, look in your logs for some hints, and keep playing
188
-    with it until it works.
189
-    </p>
190
-
191
-    <hr>
192
-    <a id="three"></a>
193
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#three">Step Three: More advanced tips</a></h2>
194
-    <br>
195
-
196
-    <p>If you plan to keep your service available for a long time, you might
197
-    want to make a backup copy of the <var>private_key</var> file somewhere.
198
-    </p>
199
-
200
-    <p>If you want to forward multiple virtual ports for a single hidden
201
-    service, just add more <var>HiddenServicePort</var> lines.
202
-    If you want to run multiple hidden services from the same Tor
203
-    client, just add another <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line. All the following
204
-    <var>HiddenServicePort</var> lines refer to this <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line, until
205
-    you add another <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line:
206
-    </p>
207
-
208
-    <pre>
209
-    HiddenServiceDir /usr/local/etc/tor/hidden_service/
210
-    HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080
211
-
212
-    HiddenServiceDir /usr/local/etc/tor/other_hidden_service/
213
-    HiddenServicePort 6667 127.0.0.1:6667
214
-    HiddenServicePort 22 127.0.0.1:22
215
-    </pre>
216
-
217
-    <p>Hidden services operators need to practice proper operational security
218
-    and system administration to maintain security. For some security
219
-    suggestions please make sure you read over Riseup's <a
220
-    href="https://help.riseup.net/en/security/network-security/tor/onionservices-best-practices">"Tor
221
-    hidden services best practices" document</a>. Also, here are some more
222
-    anonymity issues you should keep in mind:
223
-
224
-    </p>
225
-    <ul>
226
-    <li>As mentioned above, be careful of letting your web server reveal
227
-    identifying information about you, your computer, or your location.
228
-    For example, readers can probably determine whether it's thttpd or
229
-    Apache, and learn something about your operating system.</li>
230
-    <li>If your computer isn't online all the time, your hidden service
231
-    won't be either. This leaks information to an observant adversary.</li>
232
-    <li>It is generally a better idea to host hidden services on a Tor client
233
-    rather than a Tor relay, since relay uptime and other properties are
234
-    publicly visible.</li>
235
-    <li>The longer a hidden is online, the higher the risk that its
236
-    location is discovered. The most prominent attacks are building a
237
-    profile of the hidden service's availability and matching induced
238
-    traffic patterns.</li>
239
-    </ul>
240
-
241
-    <p>Another common issue is whether to use HTTPS on your relay or
242
-    not. Have a look at this <a
243
-    href="https://blog.torproject.org/blog/facebook-hidden-services-and-https-certs">post</a>
244
-    on the Tor Blog to learn more about these issues.
245
-    </p>
246
-
247
-    <p>Finally, feel free to use the <a
248
-    href="https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-onions/">[tor-onions]
249
-    mailing list</a> to discuss the secure administration and operation of
250
-    Tor hidden services.</p>
251
-
252
-  </div>
253
-  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
254
-  <div id = "sidecol">
255
-#include "side.wmi"
256
-#include "info.wmi"
257
-  </div>
258
-  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
259
-</div>
260
-<!-- END CONTENT -->
261 7
 #include <foot.wmi>
262 8
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,258 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision$
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Onion Service Configuration Instructions" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page docs/tor-onion-service>">Tor Onion Service</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <h1>Configuring Onion Services for <a href="<page index>">Tor</a></h1>
14
+    <hr>
15
+
16
+    <p>Tor allows clients and relays to offer onion services. That is,
17
+    you can offer a web server, SSH server, etc., without revealing your
18
+    IP address to its users. In fact, because you don't use any public address,
19
+    you can run an onion service from behind your firewall.
20
+    </p>
21
+
22
+    <p>If you have Tor installed, you can see onion services in action
23
+    by visiting this <a href="http://duskgytldkxiuqc6.onion/">sample
24
+    site</a>.
25
+    </p>
26
+
27
+    <p>
28
+    This page describes the steps for setting up your own onion service
29
+    website. For the technical details of how the onion service protocol
30
+    works, see our <a href="<page docs/onion-services>">onion service
31
+    protocol</a> page.
32
+    </p>
33
+
34
+    <hr>
35
+    <a id="zero"></a>
36
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#zero">Step Zero: Get Tor working</a></h2>
37
+    <br>
38
+
39
+    <p>Before you start, you need to make sure:</p>
40
+    <ol>
41
+    <li>Tor is up and running,</li>
42
+    <li>You actually set it up correctly.</li>
43
+    </ol>
44
+
45
+    <p>Windows users should follow the <a
46
+    href="<page docs/tor-doc-windows>">Windows
47
+    howto</a>, OS X users should follow the <a
48
+    href="<page docs/tor-doc-osx>">OS
49
+    X howto</a>, and Linux/BSD/Unix users should follow the <a
50
+    href="<page docs/tor-doc-unix>">Unix howto</a>.
51
+    </p>
52
+
53
+    <hr>
54
+    <a id="one"></a>
55
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#one">Step One: Install a web server locally</a></h2>
56
+    <br>
57
+
58
+    <p>
59
+    First, you need to set up a web server locally. Setting up a web
60
+    server can be complex. We're not going to cover how to set up a web
61
+    server here. If you get stuck or want to do more, find a friend who
62
+    can help you. We recommend you install a new separate web server for
63
+    your onion service, since even if you already have one installed,
64
+    you may be using it (or want to use it later) for a normal website.
65
+    </p>
66
+
67
+    <p>
68
+    You need to configure your web server so it doesn't give away any
69
+    information about you, your computer, or your location. Be sure to
70
+    bind the web server only to localhost (if people could get to it
71
+    directly, they could confirm that your computer is the one offering
72
+    the onion service). Be sure that its error messages don't list
73
+    your hostname or other hints. Consider putting the web server in a
74
+    sandbox or VM to limit the damage from code vulnerabilities.
75
+    </p>
76
+
77
+    <p>
78
+    Once your web server is set up, make
79
+    sure it works: open your browser and go to <a
80
+    href="http://localhost:8080/">http://localhost:8080/</a>, where
81
+    8080 is the webserver port you chose during setup (you can choose any
82
+    port, 8080 is just an example). Then try putting a file in the main
83
+    html directory, and make sure it shows up when you access the site.
84
+    </p>
85
+
86
+    <hr>
87
+    <a id="two"></a>
88
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#two">Step Two: Configure your onion service</a></h2>
89
+    <br>
90
+
91
+    <p>Next, you need to configure your onion service to point to your
92
+    local web server.
93
+    </p>
94
+
95
+    <p>First, open your torrc file in your favorite text editor. (See
96
+    <a href="<page docs/faq>#torrc">the torrc FAQ entry</a> to learn
97
+    what this means.) Go to the middle section and look for the line</p>
98
+
99
+    <pre>
100
+    \############### This section is just for location-hidden services ###
101
+    </pre>
102
+
103
+    <p>
104
+    This section of the file consists of groups of lines, each representing
105
+    one onion service. Right now they are all commented out (the lines
106
+    start with #), so onion services are disabled. Each group of lines
107
+    consists of one <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line, and one or more
108
+    <var>HiddenServicePort</var> lines:</p>
109
+    <ul>
110
+	<li><var>HiddenServiceDir</var> is a directory where Tor will store
111
+	information about that onion service.  In particular, Tor will create a
112
+	file here named <var>hostname</var> which will tell you the onion URL.  You
113
+	don't need to add any files to this directory. Make sure this is not the
114
+	same directory as the hidserv directory you created when setting up thttpd,
115
+	as your HiddenServiceDir contains secret information!</li>
116
+	<li><var>HiddenServicePort</var> lets you specify a virtual port (that is,
117
+	what port people accessing the onion service will think they're using) and
118
+	an IP address and port for redirecting connections to this virtual
119
+	port.</li> </ul>
120
+
121
+    <p>Add the following lines to your torrc:
122
+    </p>
123
+
124
+    <pre>
125
+    HiddenServiceDir /Library/Tor/var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
126
+    HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080
127
+    </pre>
128
+
129
+	<p>You're going to want to change the <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line, so
130
+	it points to an actual directory that is readable/writeable by the user
131
+	that will be running Tor. The above line should work if you're using the OS
132
+	X Tor package. On Unix, try "/home/username/hidden_service/" and fill in
133
+	your own username in place of "username". On Windows you might pick:</p>
134
+	<pre> HiddenServiceDir C:\Users\username\Documents\tor\hidden_service
135
+	HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080 </pre>
136
+
137
+    <p>Note that since 0.2.6, both <var>SocksPort</var> and <var>HiddenServicePort</var> support Unix sockets. 
138
+    This means that you can point the <var>HiddenServicePort</var> to a Unix socket:</p>
139
+    <pre>
140
+    HiddenServiceDir /Library/Tor/var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
141
+    HiddenServicePort 80 unix:/path/to/socket
142
+    </pre>
143
+
144
+    <p>Now save the torrc and restart your tor.</p>
145
+
146
+	<p>If Tor starts up again, great. Otherwise, something is wrong. First look
147
+	at your logfiles for hints. It will print some warnings or error messages.
148
+	That should give you an idea what went wrong. Typically there are typos in
149
+	the torrc or wrong directory permissions (See <a href="<page
150
+	docs/faq>#Logs">the logging FAQ entry</a> if you don't know how to enable
151
+	or find your log file.) </p>
152
+
153
+	<p>When Tor starts, it will automatically create the
154
+	<var>HiddenServiceDir</var> that you specified (if necessary), and it will
155
+	create two files there.</p>
156
+
157
+    <dl>
158
+    <dt><var>private_key</var></dt>
159
+    <dd>First, Tor will generate a new public/private keypair for your onion
160
+    service. It is written into a file called "private_key". Don't share this key
161
+    with others -- if you do they will be able to impersonate your onion
162
+    service.</dd>
163
+    <dt><var>hostname</var></dt>
164
+    <dd>The other file Tor will create is called "hostname". This contains
165
+    a short summary of your public key -- it will look something like
166
+    <tt>duskgytldkxiuqc6.onion</tt>. This is the public name for your service,
167
+    and you can tell it to people, publish it on websites, put it on business
168
+    cards, etc.</dd>
169
+    </dl>
170
+
171
+    <p>If Tor runs as a different user than you, for example on
172
+    OS X, Debian, or Red Hat, then you may need to become root to be able
173
+    to view these files.</p>
174
+
175
+    <p>Now that you've restarted Tor, it is busy picking introduction points
176
+    in the Tor network, and generating an <em>onion service
177
+    descriptor</em>. This is a signed list of introduction points along with
178
+    the service's full public key. It anonymously publishes this descriptor
179
+    to the directory servers, and other people anonymously fetch it from the
180
+    directory servers when they're trying to access your service.
181
+    </p>
182
+
183
+    <p>Try it now: paste the contents of the hostname file into your web
184
+    browser. If it works, you'll get the html page you set up in step one.
185
+    If it doesn't work, look in your logs for some hints, and keep playing
186
+    with it until it works.
187
+    </p>
188
+
189
+    <hr>
190
+    <a id="three"></a>
191
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#three">Step Three: More advanced tips</a></h2>
192
+    <br>
193
+
194
+    <p>If you plan to keep your service available for a long time, you might
195
+    want to make a backup copy of the <var>private_key</var> file somewhere.
196
+    </p>
197
+
198
+    <p>If you want to forward multiple virtual ports for a single onion
199
+    service, just add more <var>HiddenServicePort</var> lines.
200
+    If you want to run multiple onion services from the same Tor
201
+    client, just add another <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line. All the following
202
+    <var>HiddenServicePort</var> lines refer to this <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line, until
203
+    you add another <var>HiddenServiceDir</var> line:
204
+    </p>
205
+
206
+    <pre>
207
+    HiddenServiceDir /usr/local/etc/tor/hidden_service/
208
+    HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:8080
209
+
210
+    HiddenServiceDir /usr/local/etc/tor/other_hidden_service/
211
+    HiddenServicePort 6667 127.0.0.1:6667
212
+    HiddenServicePort 22 127.0.0.1:22
213
+    </pre>
214
+
215
+    <p>Onion services operators need to practice proper operational security
216
+    and system administration to maintain security. For some security
217
+    suggestions please make sure you read over Riseup's <a
218
+	href="https://help.riseup.net/en/security/network-security/tor/onionservices-best-practices">"Tor
219
+	Hidden (Onion) Services Best Practices" document</a>. Also, here are some
220
+	more anonymity issues you should keep in mind:
221
+
222
+    </p>
223
+    <ul>
224
+    <li>As mentioned above, be careful of letting your web server reveal
225
+    identifying information about you, your computer, or your location.
226
+    For example, readers can probably determine whether it's thttpd or
227
+    Apache, and learn something about your operating system.</li>
228
+    <li>If your computer isn't online all the time, your onion service
229
+    won't be either. This leaks information to an observant adversary.</li>
230
+    <li>It is generally a better idea to host onion services on a Tor client
231
+    rather than a Tor relay, since relay uptime and other properties are
232
+    publicly visible.</li>
233
+    <li>The longer an onion service is online, the higher the risk that its
234
+    location is discovered. The most prominent attacks are building a
235
+    profile of the onion service's availability and matching induced
236
+    traffic patterns.</li>
237
+    </ul>
238
+
239
+    <p>Another common issue is whether to use HTTPS on your relay or
240
+    not. Have a look at this <a
241
+    href="https://blog.torproject.org/blog/facebook-hidden-services-and-https-certs">post</a> on the Tor Blog to learn more about these issues.
242
+    </p>
243
+
244
+    <p>Finally, feel free to use the <a
245
+    href="https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-onions/">[tor-onions]
246
+    mailing list</a> to discuss the secure administration and operation of
247
+    Tor onion services.</p>
248
+
249
+  </div>
250
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
251
+  <div id = "sidecol">
252
+#include "side.wmi"
253
+#include "info.wmi"
254
+  </div>
255
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
256
+</div>
257
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
258
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -52,8 +52,8 @@
52 52
           {'url'  => 'docs/tor-doc-relay',
53 53
            'txt'  => 'Configuring a Relay graphically',
54 54
           },
55
-          {'url'  => 'docs/tor-hidden-service',
56
-           'txt'  => 'Configuring a Hidden Service',
55
+          {'url'  => 'docs/tor-onion-service',
56
+           'txt'  => 'Configuring an Onion Service',
57 57
           }, 
58 58
           {'url'  => 'docs/bridges',
59 59
            'txt'  => 'Configuring a Bridge Relay',
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,7 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision$
3
+# Status: obsolete
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Redirecting" REDIRECT="https://donate.torproject.org"
6
+
7
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -19,6 +19,7 @@ form#makeDonation {
19 19
     <li><a href="#bitcoin">Bitcoin</a></li>
20 20
     <li><a href="<page donate/donate-amazon>">Amazon Payments</a></li>
21 21
     <li><a href="https://smile.amazon.com/ch/20-8096820">Amazon Smile</a></li>
22
+    <li><a href="https://givingassistant.org/np#tor-project-inc">Giving Assistant</a></li>
22 23
     <li><a href="#eubanks">EU Bank Transfer</a></li>
23 24
     <li><a href="#cash">Checks or Money Orders</a></li>
24 25
     <li><a href="#stock">Donate Stock</a></li>
... ...
@@ -112,13 +113,27 @@ form#makeDonation {
112 113
       </p>
113 114
     </div>
114 115
 <!-- END AMAZON -->
116
+<!-- BEGIN GIVING -->
117
+   <a id="giving"></a>
118
+   <div class="hundred toptwenty">
119
+     <div class="dbox donate">
120
+       <h3>Donate via Giving Assistant</h3>
121
+       <p>Giving Assistant helps you donate a percentage of your cash back earnings to us with every purchase you make at 3,000+ popular online retailers.</p>
122
+       <p>
123
+          <strong>
124
+		<a href="https://givingassistant.org/np#tor-project-inc">Use Giving Assistant to save money and support the Tor Project</a>
125
+	  </strong>
126
+       </p>
127
+    </div>
128
+  </div>
129
+
130
+<!-- END GIVING -->
115 131
 <!-- BEGIN TRANSFER -->
116 132
     <a id="eubanks"></a>
117 133
     <div class="">
118 134
        <h3 style="margin-top:20px;">Donate via European Bank Transfer</h3>
119 135
        <p>For European bank transfers, we have an arrangement with
120
-        the Renewable Freedom Foundation to provide
121
-<a href="http://www.solicitorsjournal.com/news/private-client/charities/gifts-foreign-charities-are-tax-deductible-ecj-rules">tax-deductible</a>
136
+        the Renewable Freedom Foundation to provide tax-deductible
122 137
         donations for Europeans. They will issue a donation receipt <a
123 138
         href="https://renewablefreedom.org/contact/">upon request</a>. The
124 139
         account information is as follows:</p>
125 140
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,7 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision$
3
+# Status: obsolete
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Redirecting" REDIRECT="https://donate.torproject.org"
6
+
7
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,7 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision$
3
+# Status: obsolete
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Redirecting" REDIRECT="https://donate.torproject.org"
6
+
7
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@
88 88
           </li>
89 89
           <li>
90 90
             <p><strong>I would like to know more about how Tor works,
91
-            what hidden services are, or how to run a relay.</strong></p>
91
+            what onion services are, or how to run a relay.</strong></p>
92 92
             <p><a href="<page docs/faq>"
93 93
             target="_blank">This Tor Project FAQ</a> has answers to all
94 94
             those questions, and more.</p>
... ...
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@
14 14
     <ol>
15 15
     <li>Please consider <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">running
16 16
     a relay</a> to help the Tor network grow.</li>
17
-    <li>Tell your friends! Get them to run relays. Get them to run hidden
17
+    <li>Tell your friends! Get them to run relays. Get them to run onion
18 18
     services. Get them to tell their friends.</li>
19 19
     <li>If you like Tor's goals, please <a href="<page donate/donate>">take a moment
20 20
     to donate to support further Tor development</a>. We're also looking
... ...
@@ -378,12 +378,12 @@ meetings around the world.</li>
378 378
 
379 379
     <p>
380 380
     <b>Project Ideas:</b><br />
381
-    <i><a href="#improveHiddenServices">Help improve Tor hidden services</a></i><br />
381
+    <i><a href="#improveOnionServices">Help improve Tor onion services</a></i><br />
382 382
     <i><a href="#torFuzzing">Fuzzing coverage of Tor</a></i><br />
383 383
     <i><a href="#relayCryptoParallelism">Relay crypto parallelism</a></i><br />
384 384
     <i><a href="#anonymousLocalCountStatistics">Anonymous local count statistics</a></i><br />
385 385
     <i><a href="#improveSocks5Variant">Improved SOCKS5 variant</a></i><br />
386
-    <i><a href="#hiddenServiceCryptoParallelism">Hidden service crypto parallelism</a></i><br />
386
+    <i><a href="#onionServiceCryptoParallelism">Onion service crypto parallelism</a></i><br />
387 387
     <i><a href="#supportAllDNS">Support all kinds of DNS in Tor</a></i><br />
388 388
     <i><a href="#improveIpv6Support">Improve IPv6 support</a></i>
389 389
     </p>
... ...
@@ -765,28 +765,29 @@ meetings around the world.</li>
765 765
 
766 766
     <ol>
767 767
 
768
-    <a id="improveHiddenServices"></a>
768
+	#Keep old ids in case of incoming links.
769
+    <a id="improveOnionServices"></a><a id="improveHiddenServices"></a>
769 770
     <li>
770
-    <b>Help improve Tor hidden services</b>
771
+    <b>Help improve Tor onion services</b>
771 772
     <br>
772 773
     Language: <i>C</i>
773 774
     <br>
774 775
     Likely Mentors: <i>George (asn), David Goulet (dgoulet)</i>
775 776
     <br><br>
776 777
     <p>
777
-The hidden services team is busy implementing <a
778
+The onion services team is busy implementing <a
778 779
 href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/torspec.git/tree/proposals/224-rend-spec-ng.txt">proposal
779
-224</a> but we are always open to mentoring fun and exciting hidden
780
+224</a> but we are always open to mentoring fun and exciting onion
780 781
 service projects.
781 782
     </p>
782 783
 
783 784
     <p>
784
-In the past, we've mentored a wide variety of projects related to hidden
785
+In the past, we've mentored a wide variety of projects related to onion
785 786
 services, ranging from <a
786 787
 href="https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-dev/2016-April/010832.html">onion
787 788
 search engines</a>, <a
788 789
 href="https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-talk/2015-May/037966.html">to
789
-scaling techniques for hidden services</a>,
790
+scaling techniques for onion services</a>,
790 791
 and also various approaches
791 792
 of making onion services more <a
792 793
 href="https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-dev/2012-June/003588.html">usable</a>
... ...
@@ -892,24 +893,25 @@ For more information <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/12
892 893
     </p>
893 894
     </li>
894 895
 
895
-    <a id="hiddenServiceCryptoParallelism"></a>
896
+	#Keep old ids in case of incoming links.
897
+    <a id="onionServiceCryptoParallelism"></a><a id="hiddenServiceCryptoParallelism"></a>
896 898
     <li>
897
-    <b>Hidden service crypto parallelism</b>
899
+    <b>Onion service crypto parallelism</b>
898 900
     <br>
899 901
     Likely Mentors: <i>Nick (nickm), David Goulet (dgoulet)</i>
900 902
     <br><br>
901 903
     <p>
902
-Hidden services, hidden service clients, hidden service directories,
904
+Onion services, onion service clients, onion service directories,
903 905
 and introduction points all need to do a few public-key operations as
904 906
 they operate.  But right now, these operations are all done on the
905 907
 main thread.  It would be good to have these run across multiple cores.
906 908
     </p>
907 909
 
908 910
     <p>
909
-This could probably be done in a way similar to how we currently hand
911
+This could probably be done in a way similar to how we currently handle
910 912
 circuit extension handshakes in onion.c and cpuworker.c, but we'd need
911
-to extend the state machine for hidden services to add an additional
912
-state.  It could help hidden services operate much more efficiently.
913
+to extend the state machine for onion services to add an additional
914
+state.  It could help onion services operate much more efficiently.
913 915
     </p>
914 916
 
915 917
     <p>
... ...
@@ -1060,13 +1062,13 @@ For more information <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/17
1060 1062
 
1061 1063
     <a id="ahmiaSearch"></a>
1062 1064
     <li>
1063
-    <b>Ahmia - Hidden Service Search</b>
1065
+    <b>Ahmia - Onion Service Search</b>
1064 1066
     <br>
1065 1067
     Language: <i>Python, Django</i>
1066 1068
     <br>
1067 1069
     Likely Mentors: <i>Juha Nurmi (numes), George (asn)</i>
1068 1070
     <p>
1069
-    Ahmia is open-source search engine software for Tor hidden service deep
1071
+    Ahmia is open-source search engine software for Tor onion service deep
1070 1072
     dark web sites. You can test the running search engine at ahmia.fi. For
1071 1073
     more information see our <a
1072 1074
     href="https://blog.torproject.org/category/tags/ahmiafi">blog post about
... ...
@@ -1075,7 +1077,7 @@ For more information <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/17
1075 1077