Browse code

Merge branch 'master' of ssh://git-rw.torproject.org/project/web/webwml

Conflicts:
press/en/info.wmi

Roger Dingledine authored on05/05/2015 04:35:33
Showing45 changed files
... ...
@@ -14,8 +14,8 @@
14 14
 # branch to your personal webwml repository, open a trac ticket in the
15 15
 # website component, and set it to needs_review.
16 16
 
17
-export STABLETAG=tor-0.2.5.10
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-export DEVTAG=tor-0.2.6.2-alpha
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+export STABLETAG=tor-0.2.5.12
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+export DEVTAG=tor-0.2.6.7
19 19
 
20 20
 WMLBASE=.
21 21
 SUBDIRS=docs eff projects press about download getinvolved donate docs/torbutton
... ...
@@ -4,68 +4,96 @@
4 4
 
5 5
 #include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Board of Directors" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6 6
 <div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
-	<div id="breadcrumbs">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8 8
     <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9 9
     <a href="<page about/overview>">About &raquo; </a>
10 10
     <a href="<page about/board>">Board of Directors</a>
11 11
   </div>
12
-	<div id="maincol">
13
-  	<h1>Board of Directors</h1>
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <h1>Board of Directors</h1>
14 14
     <table>
15
-    	<tr>
15
+      <tr>
16
+        <td style="width:50%;">
17
+          <div class="name">Caspar Bowden</div>
18
+          <div class="caps">Director</div>
19
+          <p>
20
+            An independent advocate for information self-determination
21
+            rights, and public understanding of privacy research in
22
+            computer science. He is a specialist in data protection
23
+            policy, EU and US surveillance law, PET research, identity
24
+            management, and information ethics and philosophy.
25
+          </p>
26
+        </td>
27
+        <td class="beige" style="width:50%;">
28
+          <div class="name">Nick Mathewson</div>
29
+          <div class="caps">Vice-President and Director</div>
30
+          <p>
31
+            Nick is one of the original developers of Tor.  He's the
32
+            Chief Architect of The Tor Project, Inc.
33
+          </p>
34
+        </td>
35
+      </tr>
36
+      <tr>
16 37
         <td class="beige">
17
-	  <div class="name">Roger Dingledine</div>
18
-	  <div class="caps">President and Director</div>
19
-	    <p>Original developer of Tor along with Nick Mathewson and Paul Syverson. Leading researcher in the anonymous communications field.  Frequent speaker at conferences to advocate Tor and explain what Tor is and can do. Helps coordinate academic researchers.</p>
20
-	</td>
21
-	<td>
22
-          <div class="name">Meredith Hoban-Dunn</div>
23
-	  <div class="caps">Audit Committee Chair</div>
24
-           <p>Meredith is an accomplished accountant, advisor, and banker.  Her role is to help us make sure we're able to pass our corporate audits correctly, watch for internal fraud, tell us when we're doing things in a non-standard way, and so on.</p>
38
+          <div class="name">Roger Dingledine</div>
39
+          <div class="caps">President, Director, Interim Executive Director</div>
40
+          <p>
41
+            Original developer of Tor along with Nick Mathewson and Paul
42
+            Syverson. Leading researcher in the anonymous communications
43
+            field.  Frequent speaker at conferences to advocate Tor and
44
+            explain what Tor is and can do. Helps coordinate academic
45
+            researchers.
46
+          </p>
47
+        </td>
48
+        <td>
49
+          <div class="name">Julius Mittenzwei</div>
50
+          <div class="caps">Director</div>
51
+          <p>
52
+            Germany-based lawyer and Internet activist.
53
+          </p>
25 54
         </td>
26 55
       </tr>
27 56
       <tr>
28 57
         <td>
29 58
           <div class="name">Ian Goldberg</div>
30
-	  <div class="caps">Chairman of the Board</div>
31
-          <p>Cryptographer, privacy expert, and professor; one of the designers of <a href="http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/">Off-the-Record Messaging</a>.</p>
59
+          <div class="caps">Chairman of the Board</div>
60
+          <p>
61
+            Cryptographer, privacy expert, and professor; one of the
62
+            designers of <a
63
+            href="http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/">Off-the-Record
64
+            Messaging</a>.
65
+          </p>
32 66
         </td>
33
-	<td class="beige">
34
-	  <div class="name">Andrew Lewman</div>
35
-	  <div class="caps">Secretary, Treasurer, and Executive Director</div>
36
-	  <p>Andrew is the Executive Director responsible for all
37
-	  operations of The Tor Project, Inc.  His other activities
38
-	  can be found at <a href="http://lewman.is">his website</a>.</p>
39
-	</td>
40
-    </tr>
41
-    <tr>
42
-	<td class="beige">
43
-	  <div class="name">Nick Mathewson</div>
44
-	  <div class="caps">Vice-President and Director</div>
45
-	  <p>Nick is one of the original developers of Tor.  He's the Chief Architect of The Tor Project, Inc.</p>
46
-	 </td>
47
-	 <td>
48
-        <div class="name">Rabbi Rob Thomas</div>
49
-        <div class="caps">Director</div>
50
-          <p>Rob is CEO and founder of Team Cymru, and a
51
-          Cymru Fellow. You can learn more about Rob at the <a
52
-          href="http://www.team-cymru.org/">Team Cymru</a> websites.</p>
67
+        <td class="beige">
68
+          <div class="name">Wendy Seltzer</div>
69
+          <div class="caps">Director</div>
70
+          <p>
71
+            Lawyer, cyberlaw professor, and founder of <a
72
+            href="http://chillingeffects.org/">ChillingEffects.org</a>.
73
+          </p>
53 74
         </td>
54 75
       </tr>
55 76
       <tr>
56
-	<td>
57
-          <div class="name">Caspar Bowden</div>
58
-	  <div class="caps">Director</div>
59
-           <p>An independent advocate for information self-determination
60
-           rights, and public understanding of privacy research in
61
-           computer science. He is a specialist in data protection policy,
62
-           EU and US surveillance law, PET research, identity management,
63
-           and information ethics and philosophy.</p>
64
-        </td>
65 77
         <td class="beige">
66
-          <div class="name">Wendy Seltzer</div>
67
-	  <div class="caps">Director</div>
68
-           <p>Lawyer, cyberlaw professor, and founder of <a href="http://chillingeffects.org/">ChillingEffects.org</a>.</p>
78
+          <div class="name">Meredith Hoban-Dunn</div>
79
+          <div class="caps">Audit Committee Chair</div>
80
+          <p>
81
+            Meredith is an accomplished accountant, advisor, and
82
+            banker.  Her role is to help us make sure we're able to
83
+            pass our corporate audits correctly, watch for internal
84
+            fraud, tell us when we're doing things in a non-standard
85
+            way, and so on.
86
+          </p>
87
+        </td>
88
+        <td>
89
+          <div class="name">Rabbi Rob Thomas</div>
90
+          <div class="caps">Director</div>
91
+          <p>
92
+            Rob is CEO and founder of Team Cymru, and a Cymru Fellow.
93
+            You can learn more about Rob at the <a
94
+            href="http://www.team-cymru.org/">Team Cymru</a>
95
+            websites.
96
+          </p>
69 97
         </td>
70 98
       </tr>
71 99
     </table>
... ...
@@ -57,13 +57,14 @@
57 57
       donations means <a href="<page docs/faq>#Funding">more
58 58
       Tor</a>. We're happy to help think about creative ways for you
59 59
       to contribute.</li>
60
-      <li><i>execdir@torproject.org</i> is for press/media, questions and comments about
60
+      <li><i>press@torproject.org</i> is for press/media.</li>
61
+      <li><i>execdir@torproject.org</i> is for questions and comments about
61 62
       Tor the non-profit corporation: trademark questions, affiliation
62 63
       and coordination, major gifts, contract inquiries, licensing and
63 64
       certification, etc.</li>
64 65
       <li><i>bad-relays@lists.torproject.org</i> is for reporting exit relays
65
-      observed to be misconfigured or malicious. You do not need to subscribe
66
-      before posting.</li>
66
+      observed to be misconfigured or malicious. (This is not the same as bad
67
+      users!)</li>
67 68
     </ul>
68 69
 
69 70
     <a id="irc"></a>
... ...
@@ -87,16 +88,23 @@
87 88
 
88 89
     <a id="twitter"></a>
89 90
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#twitter">Twitter</a></h3>
90
-    <p>Follow <a href="https://twitter.com/torproject">@TorProject</a> on Twitter!</p>
91
+    <p>Follow us on Twitter:
92
+	<ul>
93
+	  <li>English account: <a href="https://twitter.com/TorProject">@TorProject</a></li>
94
+    	  <li>Farsi (Persian) account: <a href="https://twitter.com/torproject_fa">@TorProject_fa</a></li>
95
+	</ul>
96
+    </p>
91 97
 
92 98
     <a id="phone"></a>
93 99
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#phone">Telephone</a></h3>
94
-    <p>The Tor office is reachable at +1-781-948-1982. Please be aware that your
100
+    <p>Please be aware that your
95 101
     phone company and ours (and everyone in between) could listen to
96
-    the call. Please do not call for technical support, rather email
102
+    the call. Please do not call for technical support. Instead, email
97 103
     <em>help@rt.torproject.org</em>. Technical support phone calls are not
98 104
     returned.</p>
99 105
 
106
+    <p>For press inquiries only, please call +1-617-902-0208.</p>
107
+
100 108
     <a id="mail"></a>
101 109
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#mail">Mailing Address</a></h3>
102 110
     <p>Should you need to reach us via old reliable mail, our mailing
... ...
@@ -83,12 +83,12 @@
83 83
           also doing some advocacy by talking to audiences at FSCONS,
84 84
           CodeBits.eu, and various European universites.</dd>
85 85
 
86
-          <dt>Roger Dingledine, Project Leader, Director, Researcher</dt>
86
+          <dt>Roger Dingledine, Project Leader, Director, Researcher, Interim Executive Director</dt>
87 87
           <dd>Original developer of Tor along with Nick Mathewson and Paul
88 88
           Syverson. Leading researcher in the anonymous communications
89 89
           field. Frequent speaker at conferences to advocate Tor and
90 90
           explain what Tor is and can do. Helps coordinate academic
91
-          researchers. Runs one of the directory authorities.</dd>
91
+          researchers. Runs one of the directory authorities. Roger is serving as the Interim Executive Director while Tor searches for a new one to step in.</dd>
92 92
 
93 93
           <dt>Kevin Dyer, Developer, Researcher</dt>
94 94
           <dd>Main developer of <a
... ...
@@ -220,14 +220,12 @@
220 220
           <a href="http://www.subgraph.com/orchid.html">Orchid</a>,
221 221
           a Tor client in Java.</dd>
222 222
 
223
-          <dt>Andrew Lewman, Executive Director, Director,
224
-          <a href="<page press/press>">press contact</a></dt>
225
-          <dd>Manages the business operations of The Tor Project, Inc.
226
-          Plays roles of finance, advocacy, project management, strategy,
227
-          press, law enforcement liason, and victim of domestic violence
228
-          advocate. He can be contacted via OpenPGP 0x6B4D6475, <a
229
-          href="http://ostel.co/">Ostel</a> via ostel-lewman@ostel.co,
230
-          or +1-781-948-1982.</dd>
223
+          <dt>Andrew Lewman, Former Executive Director</dt>
224
+          <dd>Managed the business operations of The Tor Project, Inc.
225
+          Played roles of finance, advocacy, project management,
226
+          strategy, press, law enforcement liason, and victim of
227
+          domestic violence advocate. He is currently aiding Roger in
228
+          the Executive Director transition.</dd>
231 229
 
232 230
           <dt>Dr. Karsten Loesing, Metrics Researcher and Developer</dt>
233 231
           <dd>Primary researcher and developer into
... ...
@@ -243,10 +241,10 @@
243 241
           <dd>Flash Proxy developer, and member of the pluggable transports
244 242
           team. Helps with Debian packaging.</dd>
245 243
 
246
-          <dt>Nick Mathewson, Chief Architect, Researcher, Director</dt>
244
+          <dt>Nick Mathewson, Chief Architect, Vice President, Researcher, Director, Interim Deputy Executive Director</dt>
247 245
           <dd>One of the three original designers of Tor; does a lot
248 246
           of the ongoing design work, and coordinates and leads ongoing
249
-          development.</dd>
247
+          development. He's helping Roger while he serves as Interim Executive Director.</dd>
250 248
 
251 249
           <dt>meejah, Developer</dt>
252 250
           <dd>Author of <a
... ...
@@ -297,12 +295,6 @@
297 295
           does trainings and outreach. Runs one of the directory
298 296
           authorities.</dd>
299 297
 
300
-          <dt>Karen Reilly, Development Director</dt>
301
-          <dd>Responsible for fundraising, advocacy, general marketing,
302
-          policy outreach programs for Tor. She is also available to
303
-          speak for audiences about the benefits of online anonymity,
304
-          privacy, and Tor.</dd>
305
-
306 298
           <dt>Leif Ryge, Developer</dt>
307 299
           <dd>Works on security analysis, designer of "bananaphone"
308 300
           transport, and part of the pluggable transports team.</dd>
... ...
@@ -11,7 +11,11 @@
11 11
   <div id="maincol"> 
12 12
     <h2>Tor: Google Summer of Code 2015</h2>
13 13
     <hr>
14
-    
14
+
15
+    <h3>IMPORTANT NOTE: Tor <a href="https://lists.torproject.org/pipermail/tor-dev/2015-March/008358.html">was not accepted</a> into GSoC 2015. Hopefully we'll be back next year, but in the meantime we're running our own program: <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/org/TorSoP">the Summer of Privacy</a>!</h3>
16
+
17
+    <br /><br />
18
+
15 19
     <p>
16 20
     The Tor Project, in collaboration with <a href="https://www.eff.org/">The
17 21
     Electronic Frontier Foundation</a>, have taken part in Google Summer of Code
... ...
@@ -14,11 +14,9 @@
14 14
     <div class="sidebar-left">
15 15
       <h3>Topics</h3>
16 16
       <ul>
17
-        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#inception">Inception</a></li>
18 17
         <li><a href="<page about/overview>#overview">Overview</a></li>
19 18
         <li><a href="<page about/overview>#whyweneedtor">Why we need Tor</a></li>
20 19
         <li><a href="<page about/overview>#thesolution">The Solution</a></li>
21
-        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#hiddenservices">Hidden services</a></li>
22 20
         <li><a href="<page about/overview>#stayinganonymous">Staying anonymous</a></li>
23 21
         <li><a href="<page about/overview>#thefutureoftor">The future of Tor</a></li>
24 22
       </ul>
... ...
@@ -27,30 +25,21 @@
27 25
 
28 26
     <hr>
29 27
 
30
-    <a name="inception"></a>
31
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#inception">Inception</a></h3>
32
-
33
-    <p>
34
-    Tor was originally designed, implemented, and deployed as a
35
-    third-generation <a href="http://www.onion-router.net/">onion routing
36
-    project of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory</a>.  It was originally
37
-    developed with the U.S. Navy in mind, for the primary purpose of
38
-    protecting government communications.  Today, it is used every day
39
-    for a wide variety of purposes by normal people, the military,
40
-    journalists, law enforcement officers, activists, and many
41
-    others. </p>
42
-
43 28
     <a name="overview"></a>
44 29
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#overview">Overview</a></h3>
45 30
 
46 31
     <p>
47
-    Tor is a network of virtual tunnels that allows people and groups to
48
-    improve their privacy and security on the Internet.  It also enables
49
-    software developers to create new communication tools
50
-    with built-in privacy features.  Tor provides the foundation for
51
-    a range of applications that allow organizations and individuals
52
-    to share information over public networks without compromising their
53
-    privacy.
32
+    The Tor network is a group of <a href="<page
33
+    getinvolved/volunteer>">volunteer</a>-operated servers that allows people
34
+    to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. Tor's users employ
35
+    this network by connecting through a series of virtual tunnels rather than
36
+    making a direct connection, thus allowing both organizations and
37
+    individuals to share information over public networks without compromising
38
+    their privacy. Along the same line, Tor is an effective censorship
39
+    circumvention tool, allowing its users to reach otherwise blocked
40
+    destinations or content.  Tor can also be used as a building block for
41
+    software developers to create new communication tools with built-in privacy
42
+    features.
54 43
     </p>
55 44
 
56 45
     <p>
... ...
@@ -196,24 +185,6 @@
196 185
 
197 186
     <p><img alt="Tor circuit step three" src="$(IMGROOT)/htw3.png"></p>
198 187
 
199
-
200
-    <a name="hiddenservices"></a>
201
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#hiddenservices">Hidden services</a></h3>
202
-
203
-    <p>
204
-    Tor also makes it possible for users to hide their locations while
205
-    offering various kinds of services, such as web publishing or an instant
206
-    messaging server.  Using Tor "rendezvous points," other Tor users can
207
-    connect to these hidden services, each without knowing the other's
208
-    network identity.  This hidden service functionality could allow Tor
209
-    users to set up a website where people publish material without worrying
210
-    about censorship.  Nobody would be able to determine who was offering
211
-    the site, and nobody who offered the site would know who was posting to it.
212
-    Learn more about <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">configuring
213
-    hidden services</a> and how the <a href="<page docs/hidden-services>">hidden
214
-    service protocol</a> works.
215
-    </p>
216
-
217 188
     <a name="stayinganonymous"></a>
218 189
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#stayinganonymous">Staying anonymous</a></h3>
219 190
 
... ...
@@ -25,21 +25,22 @@
25 25
 
26 26
     <h3>Active Sponsors in 2015:</h3>
27 27
       <ul>
28
-	  <li><a href="http://www.rfa.org/english/">Radio Free Asia</a> (2012-2014)</li>
28
+	  <li><a href="<page donate/donate>">More than 4,300 personal donations from individuals like you</a> (2006-present)</li>
29
+	  <li><a href="https://www.reddit.com/">Reddit</a> (2015)</li>
30
+	  <li><a href="http://www.rfa.org/english/">Radio Free Asia</a> (2012-2016)</li>
29 31
 	  <li><a href="http://nsf.gov/">National Science Foundation</a> joint with Georgia Tech and Princeton University (2012-2016)</li>
30 32
 	  <li><a href="http://nsf.gov/">National Science Foundation</a> via University of Minnesota (2013-2017)</li>
31 33
 	  <li><a href="https://digitaldefenders.org/">Hivos/The Digital Defenders Partnership</a> (2014-2015)</li>
32 34
 	  <li><a href="http://www.sri.com/">SRI International</a> (2011-2015)</li>
33 35
 	  <li><a href="http://www.state.gov/j/drl/">US Department of State Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor</a> (2013-2016)</li>
34 36
 	  <li>An anonymous North American ISP (2009-present)</li>
35
-	  <li><a href="http://code.google.com/soc/">Google Summer of Code</a> (2007-present)</li>
36
-	  <li><a href="<page donate/donate>">More than 4,300 personal donations from individuals like you</a> (2006-present)</li>
37 37
       </ul>
38 38
 
39 39
     <h3>Past sponsors</h3>
40 40
     <p>We greatly appreciate the support provided by our past sponsors
41 41
     in keeping the Tor Project progressing through our ambitious goals:</p>
42 42
     	<ul>
43
+	  <li><a href="http://code.google.com/soc/">Google Summer of Code</a> (2007-2014)</li>
43 44
 	  <li><a href="http://www.fordfoundation.org/">The Ford Foundation</a> (2013-2014)</li>
44 45
 	  <li><a href="https://disconnect.me/">Disconnect</a> (2014)</li>
45 46
 	  <li><a href="https://freedom.press/">Freedom of the Press Foundation</a> (2014)</li>
... ...
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@
29 29
     href="https://blog.torproject.org/blog/we-need-your-good-tor-stories">good
30 30
     Tor stories</a>! What do you use Tor for? Why do you need it? What
31 31
     has Tor done for you? We need your stories.</p>
32
-    
32
+
33 33
     <a name="normalusers"></a>
34 34
     <img src="$(IMGROOT)/family.jpg" alt="Normal People">
35 35
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#normalusers">Normal people use Tor</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -64,35 +64,7 @@
64 64
 </li>
65 65
 <li><strong>They circumvent censorship.</strong> If you live in a country that has ever <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship_of_Facebook">blocked Facebook</a> or <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship_of_YouTube">Youtube</a>, you might need to use Tor to get basic internet functionality. </li>
66 66
     </ul>
67
-    
68
-    <a name="military"></a>
69
-    <img src="$(IMGROOT)/military.jpg" alt="Military and Law Enforcement">
70
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#military">Militaries use Tor</a></h2>
71
-    <hr>
72
-    <ul>
73
-    
74
-    <li>
75
-    <strong>Field agents:</strong>
76
-    It is not difficult for insurgents to monitor Internet traffic and
77
-    discover all the hotels and other locations from which people are
78
-    connecting to known military servers.
79
-    Military field agents deployed away from home use Tor to
80
-    mask the sites they are visiting, protecting military interests and
81
-    operations, as well as protecting themselves from physical harm.
82
-    </li>
83
-    
84
-    <li><strong>Hidden services:</strong>
85
-    When the Internet was designed by DARPA, its primary purpose was to be able to facilitate distributed, robust communications in case of
86
-    local strikes.  However, some functions must be centralized, such as command and control sites.  It's the nature of the Internet protocols to
87
-    reveal the geographic location of any server that is reachable online.  Tor's hidden services capacity allows military command and
88
-    control to be physically secure from discovery and takedown.
89
-    </li>
90
-    <li><strong>Intelligence gathering:</strong>
91
-    Military personnel need to use electronic resources run and monitored by insurgents. They do not want the webserver logs on an insurgent website
92
-    to record a military address, thereby revealing the surveillance.
93
-    </li>
94
-    </ul>
95
-    
67
+
96 68
     <a name="journalist"></a>
97 69
     <img src="$(IMGROOT)/media.jpg" alt="Journalists and the Media">
98 70
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#journalist">Journalists and their audience use Tor</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -118,7 +90,7 @@
118 90
     avoid risking the personal consequences of intellectual curiosity.
119 91
     </li>
120 92
     </ul>
121
-    
93
+
122 94
     <a name="lawenforcement"></a>
123 95
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#lawenforcement">Law enforcement officers use Tor</a></h2>
124 96
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -144,7 +116,7 @@
144 116
     do not encourage anonymity are limiting the sources of their tips.
145 117
     </li>
146 118
     </ul>
147
-    
119
+
148 120
     <a name="activists"></a>
149 121
     <img src="$(IMGROOT)/activists.jpg" alt="Activists &amp; Whistleblowers">
150 122
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#activists">Activists &amp; Whistleblowers use Tor</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -212,7 +184,7 @@
212 184
     to help organize a strike.
213 185
     </li>
214 186
     </ul>
215
-    
187
+
216 188
     <a name="spotlight"></a>
217 189
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#spotlight">High &amp; low profile people use Tor</a></h2>
218 190
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -241,7 +213,7 @@
241 213
     this continuing into the future.
242 214
     </li>
243 215
     </ul>
244
-    
216
+
245 217
     <a name="executives"></a>
246 218
     <img src="$(IMGROOT)/consumers.jpg" alt="Businesses">
247 219
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#executives">Business executives use Tor</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -279,7 +251,7 @@
279 251
     into whistleblowing.
280 252
     </li>
281 253
     </ul>
282
-    
254
+
283 255
     <a name="bloggers"></a>
284 256
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#bloggers">Bloggers use Tor</a></h2>
285 257
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -291,7 +263,35 @@
291 263
     <li>We recommend the <a href="http://www.eff.org/issues/bloggers/legal">EFF Legal Guide for Bloggers</a>.</li>
292 264
     <li>Global Voices maintains a <a href="http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/projects/guide/">guide to anonymous blogging with Wordpress and Tor</a>.</li>
293 265
     </ul>
294
-    
266
+
267
+    <a name="military"></a>
268
+    <img src="$(IMGROOT)/military.jpg" alt="Military and Law Enforcement">
269
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#military">Militaries use Tor</a></h2>
270
+    <hr>
271
+    <ul>
272
+
273
+    <li>
274
+    <strong>Field agents:</strong>
275
+    It is not difficult for insurgents to monitor Internet traffic and
276
+    discover all the hotels and other locations from which people are
277
+    connecting to known military servers.
278
+    Military field agents deployed away from home use Tor to
279
+    mask the sites they are visiting, protecting military interests and
280
+    operations, as well as protecting themselves from physical harm.
281
+    </li>
282
+
283
+    <li><strong>Hidden services:</strong>
284
+    When the Internet was designed by DARPA, its primary purpose was to be able to facilitate distributed, robust communications in case of
285
+    local strikes.  However, some functions must be centralized, such as command and control sites.  It's the nature of the Internet protocols to
286
+    reveal the geographic location of any server that is reachable online.  Tor's hidden services capacity allows military command and
287
+    control to be physically secure from discovery and takedown.
288
+    </li>
289
+    <li><strong>Intelligence gathering:</strong>
290
+    Military personnel need to use electronic resources run and monitored by insurgents. They do not want the webserver logs on an insurgent website
291
+    to record a military address, thereby revealing the surveillance.
292
+    </li>
293
+    </ul>
294
+
295 295
     <a name="itprofessionals"></a>
296 296
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#itprofessionals">IT Professionals use Tor</a></h2>
297 297
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -302,7 +302,7 @@
302 302
     <li>To access internet resources: Acceptable use policy for IT Staff and normal employees is usually different. Tor can allow unfettered access to the internet while leaving standard security policies in place.</li>
303 303
     <li>To work around ISP network outages: Sometimes when an ISP is having routing or DNS problems, Tor can make internet resources available, when the actual ISP is malfunctioning. This can be invaluable in crisis situations. </li>
304 304
     </ul>
305
-    
305
+
306 306
     <p>
307 307
     Please do send us your success stories. They are very important because
308 308
     Tor provides anonymity. While it is thrilling to speculate about <a
... ...
@@ -312,7 +312,7 @@
312 312
     counterproductive.  For example, we talked to an FBI officer who
313 313
     explained that he uses Tor every day for his work &mdash; but he quickly followed up with a request not to provide
314 314
     details or mention his name.</p>
315
-    
315
+
316 316
     <p> Like any technology, from pencils to cellphones, anonymity can be used for both good and bad.  You have probably seen some of the vigorous
317 317
     debate (<a href="http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2006/01/70000">pro</a>,
318 318
     <a href="http://www.edge.org/q2006/q06_4.html#kelly">con</a>, and <a
... ...
@@ -12,21 +12,6 @@
12 12
 	<div id="maincol">
13 13
   	<h1>Volunteers</h1>
14 14
     <dl>
15
-<dt>Google Summer of Code, 2012</dt><dd>
16
-Brandon Wiley - <a href="http://stepthreeprivacy.org/">Python Pluggable Transports</a><br />
17
-Feroze Naina - <a href="http://feroze.in/gsoc12.html">Hidden Service Configuration</a><br />
18
-Michele OrrĂ¹ - APAF<br />
19
-Ravi Padmala - <a href="../about/gsocProposal/gsoc12-proposal-stemImprovements.html">Stem Improvements and Arm port</a><br />
20
-vmon - Stegotorus</dd>
21
-
22
-<dt>Google Summer of Code, 2011</dt><dd>
23
-Brandon Wiley - <a href="http://stepthreeprivacy.org/">Blocking-resistant Transport Evaluation Framework</a><br />
24
-asn - <a href="https://gitorious.org/obfsproxy/pages/Home">Pluggable transports</a><br />
25
-Julien Voisin - <a href="https://mat.boum.org/">Metadata Anonymisation Toolkit</a><br />
26
-Kamran Khan - <a href="http://code.inspirated.com/">GTK+ Frontend and Client Mode Improvements for arm</a><br />
27
-Max - <a href="https://tails.boum.org/todo/TailsGreeter/blog/">Custom GDM3 startup menu, aka. tails-greeter</a><br />
28
-Sathyanarayanan Gunasekaran - <a href="http://gsathya.in/blog/">GSoC : Orbot + ORLib</a></dd>
29
-
30 15
 <dt>Anonym, bertagaz, and intrigeri</dt><dd>Maintainers of <a
31 16
 href="https://tails.boum.org/">The Amnesic Incognito Live System</a>.</dd>
32 17
 <dt>Marco Bonetti</dt><dd>Focusing on MobileTor for the iPhone.</dd>
... ...
@@ -39,6 +24,9 @@ question about Tor.</dd>
39 24
 technology.</dd>
40 25
 <dt>Fabian Keil</dt><dd>One of the core Privoxy developers, and also a
41 26
 Tor fan. He's the reason Tor and Privoxy still work well together.</dd>
27
+<dt>Juha Nurmi</dt><dd>GSoC student in 2014 and researcher behind <a
28
+href="https://blog.torproject.org/category/tags/ahmiafi">Ahmia</a>, a search
29
+engine for hidden services.</dd>
42 30
 <dt>Julius Mittenzwei</dt><dd>A lawyer with the CCC in
43 31
 Germany. Coordinates the German Tor community with respect to legal
44 32
 questions and concerns.</dd>
... ...
@@ -660,6 +660,20 @@ table tr img {
660 660
 	padding-bottom: 8px;
661 661
 }
662 662
 
663
+.howto th, .howto td {
664
+	padding: 2px;
665
+}
666
+
667
+.howto th {
668
+	font-weight: bold;
669
+	text-align: center;
670
+}
671
+
672
+.howto img {
673
+	border: 0;
674
+	margin: 0;
675
+}
676
+
663 677
 #download-donate {
664 678
 	background-attachment: scroll;
665 679
 	background-clip: border-box;
... ...
@@ -991,7 +1005,6 @@ small {
991 1005
 	.dbox h2 {
992 1006
 		padding:13px 0px 15px 0px;
993 1007
         position: relative;
994
-        width: 190px;
995 1008
 		color: black;
996 1009
         font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
997 1010
 		font-size: 18px;
... ...
@@ -281,7 +281,7 @@
281 281
     the bridges.  Almost instantly, you'll receive a reply that includes:
282 282
     </p>
283 283
     <pre>
284
-    Here are your bridge:
284
+    Here are your bridges:
285 285
 
286 286
      60.16.182.53:9001
287 287
      87.237.118.139:444
... ...
@@ -323,19 +323,13 @@
323 323
     your torrc file</a> to be just these four lines:<br>
324 324
     <pre><code>
325 325
     SocksPort 0
326
-    ORPort 443
326
+    ORPort auto
327 327
     BridgeRelay 1
328 328
     Exitpolicy reject *:*
329 329
     </code></pre></li>
330 330
     </ul>
331 331
     </p>
332 332
 
333
-    <p>If you get "Could not bind to 0.0.0.0:443: Permission denied" errors
334
-    on startup, you'll need to pick a higher ORPort (e.g. 8080) or do <a
335
-    href="<page docs/faq>#HowcanImakemyrelayaccessibletopeoplestuckbehindrestrictivefirewalls">some
336
-    complex port forwarding</a>.
337
-    </p>
338
-
339 333
     <p>
340 334
     When configured as a bridge, your server will <b>not</b> appear in the public
341 335
     Tor network.
... ...
@@ -3,6 +3,167 @@
3 3
 # Translation-Priority: 3-low
4 4
 
5 5
 #include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Debian/Ubuntu Instructions" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+
7
+<script>
8
+<!--
9
+// This code is based on the http://mozilla.debian.net sources.list
10
+// generator as originally written by Mike Hommey. It is licensed under
11
+// the terms of the GNU GPLv2, http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html.
12
+var sources = {};
13
+var software = {
14
+'tor': { '_stable': { 'squeeze': [ 'squeeze' ],
15
+                     'wheezy':  [ 'wheezy' ],
16
+                     'jessie':  [ 'jessie' ],
17
+                     'sid':     [ 'sid' ],
18
+                     'lucid':   [ 'lucid'],
19
+                     'precise': [ 'precise'],
20
+                     'saucy':   [ 'saucy'],
21
+                     'trusty':  [ 'trusty'],
22
+                     'utopic':  [ 'utopic'] },
23
+         'experimental-0.2.6.x':    { 'squeeze': [ 'squeeze' ],
24
+                     'wheezy':  [ 'wheezy' ],
25
+                     'jessie':  [ 'jessie' ],
26
+                     'sid':     [ 'sid' ],
27
+                     'lucid':   [ 'lucid'],
28
+                     'precise': [ 'precise'],
29
+                     'saucy':   [ 'saucy'],
30
+                     'trusty':  [ 'trusty'],
31
+                     'utopic':  [ 'utopic'] },
32
+       },
33
+'tor (from source)': { '_stable': { 'squeeze': [ 'squeeze' ],
34
+                     'wheezy':  [ 'wheezy' ],
35
+                     'jessie':  [ 'jessie' ],
36
+                     'sid':     [ 'sid' ],
37
+                     'lucid':   [ 'lucid'],
38
+                     'precise': [ 'precise'],
39
+                     'saucy':   [ 'saucy'],
40
+                     'trusty':  [ 'trusty'],
41
+                     'utopic':  [ 'utopic'] },
42
+         'experimental-0.2.6.x':    { 'squeeze': [ 'squeeze' ],
43
+                     'wheezy':  [ 'wheezy' ],
44
+                     'jessie':  [ 'jessie' ],
45
+                     'sid':     [ 'sid' ],
46
+                     'lucid':   [ 'lucid'],
47
+                     'precise': [ 'precise'],
48
+                     'saucy':   [ 'saucy'],
49
+                     'trusty':  [ 'trusty'],
50
+                     'utopic':  [ 'utopic'] },
51
+       },
52
+};
53
+
54
+function init() {
55
+    pkg = document.getElementById('package');
56
+    for (soft in software) {
57
+        if (soft != pkg.value) {
58
+            option = document.createElement('option');
59
+            option.value = soft;
60
+            option.appendChild(document.createTextNode(soft.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + soft.slice(1)));
61
+            pkg.appendChild(option);
62
+        }
63
+    }
64
+
65
+    apt_get = document.getElementById('apt-get');
66
+    para = document.createElement('p');
67
+    para.id = 'sorry';
68
+    para.style.display = 'none';
69
+    apt_get.parentNode.insertBefore(para, apt_get);
70
+    para.appendChild(document.createTextNode("Sorry, this version is not available.\n"));
71
+
72
+    document.getElementById('selector').style.display = 'block';
73
+
74
+    update();
75
+}
76
+
77
+function replaceText(src, txt) {
78
+    while (src.firstChild)
79
+        src.removeChild(src.firstChild);
80
+    src.appendChild(document.createTextNode(txt));
81
+}
82
+
83
+function update() {
84
+    pkg = document.getElementById('package');
85
+    ver = document.getElementById('version');
86
+    package = pkg.value;
87
+    version = ver.value;
88
+    distrib = document.getElementById('distrib').value;
89
+    if (package != pkg.prev) {
90
+        while (ver.firstChild)
91
+            ver.removeChild(ver.firstChild);
92
+        var selected;
93
+        for (version in software[package]) {
94
+            option = document.createElement('option');
95
+            if (version[0] == '_') {
96
+                version = version.slice(1);
97
+                selected = version;
98
+            }
99
+            option.appendChild(document.createTextNode(version));
100
+            option.value = version = version.replace(/ \(.*\)/,'');
101
+//alert(version);
102
+            ver.appendChild(option);
103
+        }
104
+        ver.value = version = selected || version;
105
+        pkg.prev = package
106
+    }
107
+    try {
108
+        keys = software[package][version][distrib];
109
+    } catch (e) {
110
+        try {
111
+            keys = software[package]['_' + version][distrib];
112
+        } catch (e) { };
113
+    }
114
+    src = document.getElementById('sources');
115
+    txt = '';
116
+    need_signed = false;
117
+    source_install = false;
118
+    target = '';
119
+    for (i = 0; keys && (i < keys.length); i++) {
120
+//alert(keys[i]);
121
+        if (keys[i] in sources) {
122
+            txt += sources[keys[i]];
123
+            target = keys[i];
124
+        } else {
125
+            if (package.slice(-7, -1) == 'source') {
126
+                package = package.split(' ')[0];
127
+                source_install = true;
128
+            }
129
+            txt += "http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org";
130
+            txt += " ";
131
+            txt += keys[i];
132
+            txt += " main";
133
+            need_signed = true;
134
+            target = keys[i];
135
+            txt = "deb " + txt + "\ndeb-src " + txt;
136
+            if (version != 'stable') {
137
+                txt2 = "http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org";
138
+                txt2 += " ";
139
+                txt2 += package;
140
+                txt2 += "-";
141
+                txt2 += version;
142
+                txt2 += "-";
143
+                txt2 += keys[i];
144
+                txt2 += " main";
145
+                txt = txt + "\ndeb " + txt2 + "\ndeb-src " + txt2;
146
+            }
147
+        }
148
+        txt += "\n";
149
+    }
150
+    replaceText(src, txt);
151
+    document.getElementById('regular-install').style.display = source_install ? 'none' : 'block';
152
+    document.getElementById('source-install').style.display = source_install ? 'block' : 'none';
153
+    document.getElementById('source-install2').style.display = source_install ? 'block' : 'none';
154
+    replaceText(document.getElementById('apt-package'), package);
155
+    document.getElementById('apt-source').style.display = (keys && keys.length) ? 'block' : 'none';
156
+    document.getElementById('apt-get').style.display = keys ? 'block' : 'none';
157
+    document.getElementById('sorry').style.display = keys ? 'none' : 'block';
158
+}
159
+
160
+window.onload = init;
161
+
162
+-->
163
+</script>
164
+
165
+
166
+
6 167
 <div id="content" class="clearfix">
7 168
   <div id="breadcrumbs">
8 169
     <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
... ...
@@ -16,8 +177,8 @@ Debian sid, or Debian testing</a></h2>
16 177
 <br />
17 178
 
18 179
 <p>
19
-If you're using Debian, just run<br />
20
-<tt>apt-get install tor</tt>
180
+If you're using Debian, just run
181
+</blockquote><pre>  apt-get install tor </pre></blockquote>
21 182
 as root.
22 183
 </p>
23 184
 
... ...
@@ -61,7 +222,73 @@ Tor. First, you need to figure out the name of your distribution. A
61 222
 quick command to run is <tt>lsb_release -c</tt> or <tt>cat /etc/debian_version</tt>.
62 223
 If in doubt about your Debian version, check <a href="http://www.debian.org/releases/">the Debian website</a>.
63 224
 For Ubuntu, ask <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ubuntu_releases#Table_of_versions">Wikipedia</a>.
225
+</p>
226
+
227
+<div id="selector" style="display: none;">
228
+<blockquote>
229
+I run
230
+<select id="distrib" onchange="update()">
231
+<option value="squeeze">Debian oldstable (Squeeze)</option>
232
+<option value="wheezy" selected="selected">Debian stable (Wheezy)</option>
233
+<option value="jessie">Debian testing (Jessie)</option>
234
+<option value="sid">Debian unstable (sid)</option>
235
+<option value="lucid">Ubuntu Lucid Lynx</option>
236
+<option value="precise">Ubuntu Precise Pangolin</option>
237
+<option value="saucy">Ubuntu Saucy Salamander</option>
238
+<option value="trusty">Ubuntu Trusty Tahr</option>
239
+<option value="utopic">Ubuntu Utopic Unicorn</option>
240
+</select>
241
+and want
242
+<select id="package" onchange="update()"></select>
243
+version
244
+<select id="version" onchange="update()"></select>
245
+</blockquote>
246
+
247
+
248
+<div id="apt-source">
249
+<p>You need to add the following entry in <code>/etc/apt/sources.list</code> or a new file in <code>/etc/apt/sources.list.d/</code>:</p>
250
+
251
+<blockquote><pre id="sources">deb http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org wheezy main
252
+</pre></blockquote>
253
+</div>
64 254
 
255
+<div id="sig">
256
+<p>Then add the gpg key used to sign the packages by running the following commands at your command prompt:</p>
257
+<blockquote><pre>
258
+gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv 886DDD89
259
+gpg --export A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89 | sudo apt-key add -
260
+</pre></blockquote>
261
+</div>
262
+
263
+
264
+<div id="apt-get">
265
+<p>You can install it with the following commands:</p>
266
+<blockquote><pre>$ apt-get update
267
+<span id="regular-install">$ apt-get install <span id="apt-package">tor</span> deb.torproject.org-keyring</span>
268
+<span id="source-install">$ apt-get install build-essential fakeroot devscripts
269
+$ apt-get build-dep tor deb.torproject.org-keyring</span></pre></blockquote>
270
+
271
+<div id="source-install2">
272
+<p>
273
+Then you can build Tor in ~/debian-packages:
274
+</p>
275
+<blockquote><pre>
276
+$ mkdir ~/debian-packages; cd ~/debian-packages
277
+$ apt-get source tor
278
+$ cd tor-*
279
+$ debuild -rfakeroot -uc -us
280
+$ cd ..
281
+</pre></blockquote>
282
+<p>Now you can install the new package:</p>
283
+<blockquote><pre>
284
+$ sudo dpkg -i tor_*.deb
285
+</pre></blockquote>
286
+</div>
287
+</div>
288
+</div>
289
+
290
+<noscript>
291
+<p>
65 292
 Then add this line to your
66 293
 <tt>/etc/apt/sources.list</tt>
67 294
 file:<br />
... ...
@@ -103,12 +330,15 @@ apt-get install tor
103 330
 </pre>
104 331
 </p>
105 332
 
333
+</noscript>
334
+
106 335
 <p>
107 336
 Now Tor is installed and running. Move on to <a href="<page
108 337
 docs/tor-doc-unix>#using">step two</a> of the "Tor on Linux/Unix"
109 338
 instructions.
110 339
 </p>
111 340
 
341
+<noscript>
112 342
 <p style="font-size: small">
113 343
 The DNS name <code>deb.torproject.org</code> is actually a set of independent
114 344
 servers in a DNS round robin configuration.  If you for some reason cannot
... ...
@@ -200,11 +430,7 @@ Now Tor is installed and running. Move on to <a href="<page
200 430
 docs/tor-doc-unix>#using">step two</a> of the "Tor on Linux/Unix"
201 431
 instructions.
202 432
 </p>
203
-
204
-<hr />
205
-
206
-<p>If you have suggestions for improving this document, please <a
207
-href="<page about/contact>">send them to us</a>. Thanks!</p>
433
+</noscript>
208 434
 
209 435
 <!-- END MAIN COL -->
210 436
   </div>
... ...
@@ -741,10 +741,10 @@ with more funding?</a></h3>
741 741
 href="https://metrics.torproject.org/network.html#networksize">several
742 742
     thousand</a> relays push <a
743 743
     href="https://metrics.torproject.org/network.html#bandwidth">over
744
-    1GB per second on average</a>. We have <a
744
+    7.5GB per second on average</a>. We have <a
745 745
 
746
-href="https://metrics.torproject.org/users.html#direct-users">several
747
-    hundred thousand daily users</a>. But the Tor network is not yet
746
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/users.html#direct-users">millions of
747
+    daily users</a>. But the Tor network is not yet
748 748
     self-sustaining.
749 749
     </p>
750 750
 
... ...
@@ -1050,7 +1050,7 @@ and send an email to '<tt>gettor@torproject.org</tt>' with one of the
1050 1050
 following words in the body of the message: <tt>windows</tt>,
1051 1051
 <tt>osx</tt> or <tt>linux</tt> (case insensitive).
1052 1052
 You will receive a reply with links from popular cloud services to
1053
-download Tor Browser for Windows, Mac OSX or Linux, depending on the
1053
+download Tor Browser for Windows, Mac OS X or Linux, depending on the
1054 1054
 option you chose. Currently, the only cloud service supported is
1055 1055
 Dropbox. If you send a blank message or anything different from the
1056 1056
 options mentioned, you will receive a help message with detailed
... ...
@@ -1587,11 +1587,6 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1587 1587
     <pre>
1588 1588
     ServerTransportPlugin obfs3 exec /usr/bin/obfsproxy managed
1589 1589
     </pre>
1590
-    <p>
1591
-    This third option is pretty klunky right now; see e.g. <a
1592
-    href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/10449">this bug</a>;
1593
-    but we're hoping it will become an easy option in the future.
1594
-    </p>
1595 1590
 
1596 1591
     <hr>
1597 1592
 
... ...
@@ -1639,7 +1634,8 @@ configuration should work fine for most Tor users.
1639 1634
 </p>
1640 1635
 <p>
1641 1636
 If you installed Tor Browser, look for
1642
-<code>Data/Tor/torrc</code> inside your Tor Browser directory.
1637
+<code>Browser/TorBrowser/Data/Tor/torrc</code> inside your Tor Browser
1638
+directory.
1643 1639
 On OS X, you must right-click or command-click on the Tor Browser icon,
1644 1640
 and select "Show Package Contents" before the Tor Browser directories become
1645 1641
 visible.
... ...
@@ -2300,7 +2296,7 @@ too.
2300 2296
     BandwidthRate is the maximum long-term bandwidth allowed (bytes per
2301 2297
     second). For example, you might want to choose "BandwidthRate 10 MBytes"
2302 2298
     for 10 megabytes per second (a fast connection), or "BandwidthRate 500
2303
-    KBytes" for 500 kilobytes per second (a pretty good cable connection).
2299
+    KBytes" for 500 kilobytes per second (a decent cable connection).
2304 2300
     The minimum BandwidthRate setting is 20 kilobytes per second.
2305 2301
     </li>
2306 2302
     <li>
... ...
@@ -2448,7 +2444,7 @@ too.
2448 2444
         may be torrc.client and torrc.relay.</li>
2449 2445
         <li>Modify the Tor client and relay startup scripts to include
2450 2446
         '-f /path/to/correct/torrc'.</li>
2451
-        <li>In Linux/BSD/OSX, changing the startup scripts to Tor.client
2447
+        <li>In Linux/BSD/Mac OS X, changing the startup scripts to Tor.client
2452 2448
         and Tor.relay may make separation of configs easier.</li>
2453 2449
     </ul>
2454 2450
 
... ...
@@ -3626,7 +3622,7 @@ information on the two sides.
3626 3622
 So, what should we do? Suppose the attacker controls, or can observe,
3627 3623
 <i>C</i> relays. Suppose there are <i>N</i> relays total. If you select
3628 3624
 new entry and exit relays each time you use the network, the attacker
3629
-will be able to correlate all traffic you send with probability
3625
+will be able to correlate all traffic you send with probability around
3630 3626
 <i>(c/n)<sup>2</sup></i>. But profiling is, for most users, as bad
3631 3627
 as being traced all the time: they want to do something often without
3632 3628
 an attacker noticing, and the attacker noticing once is as bad as the
... ...
@@ -9,10 +9,10 @@
9 9
     <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
10 10
     <a href="<page docs/hidden-services>">Hidden Services</a>
11 11
   </div>
12
-  <div id="maincol"> 
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13 13
     <h2>Tor: Hidden Service Protocol</h2>
14 14
     <hr>
15
-    
15
+
16 16
     <p>
17 17
     Tor makes it possible for users to hide their locations while offering
18 18
     various kinds of services, such as web publishing or an instant
... ...
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@
23 23
     href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">configuring hidden services</a>
24 24
     page.
25 25
     </p>
26
-    
26
+
27 27
     <p>
28 28
     A hidden service needs to advertise its existence in the Tor network before
29 29
     clients will be able to contact it. Therefore, the service randomly picks
... ...
@@ -36,11 +36,11 @@
36 36
     service's identity (public key), we don't want them to learn about the
37 37
     hidden server's location (IP address).
38 38
     </p>
39
-    
39
+
40 40
     <img alt="Tor hidden service step one" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-1.png">
41 41
     # maybe add a speech bubble containing "PK" to Bob, because that's what
42 42
     # Bob tells to his introduction points
43
-    
43
+
44 44
     <p>
45 45
     Step two: the hidden service assembles a <em>hidden service
46 46
     descriptor</em>, containing its public key and a summary of each
... ...
@@ -50,7 +50,7 @@
50 50
     name derived from the service's public key. After
51 51
     this step, the hidden service is set up.
52 52
     </p>
53
-    
53
+
54 54
     <p>
55 55
     Although it might seem impractical to use an automatically-generated
56 56
     service name, it serves an important goal: Everyone &ndash; including
... ...
@@ -62,12 +62,12 @@
62 62
     href="http://www.skyhunter.com/marcs/petnames/IntroPetNames.html">Petname</a>
63 63
     design for hidden service names?
64 64
     </p>
65
-    
65
+
66 66
     <img alt="Tor hidden service step two" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-2.png">
67 67
     # maybe replace "database" with "DHT"; further: how incorrect
68 68
     # is it to *not* add DB to the Tor cloud, now that begin dir cells are in
69 69
     # use?
70
-    
70
+
71 71
     <p>
72 72
     Step three: A client that wants to contact a hidden service needs
73 73
     to learn about its onion address first. After that, the client can
... ...
@@ -80,11 +80,11 @@
80 80
     randomly picked relay and asks it to act as <em>rendezvous point</em>
81 81
     by telling it a one-time secret.
82 82
     </p>
83
-    
83
+
84 84
     <img alt="Tor hidden service step three" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-3.png">
85 85
     # maybe add "cookie" to speech bubble, separated from the surrounded
86 86
     # "IP1-3" and "PK"
87
-    
87
+
88 88
     <p>
89 89
     Step four: When the descriptor is present and the rendezvous
90 90
     point is ready, the client assembles an <em>introduce</em> message
... ...
@@ -95,16 +95,16 @@
95 95
     via a Tor circuit: nobody can relate sending the introduce message
96 96
     to the client's IP address, so the client remains anonymous.
97 97
     </p>
98
-    
98
+
99 99
     <img alt="Tor hidden service step four" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-4.png">
100
-    
100
+
101 101
     <p>
102 102
     Step five: The hidden service decrypts the client's introduce message
103 103
     and finds the address of the rendezvous point and the one-time secret
104 104
     in it. The service creates a circuit to the rendezvous point and
105 105
     sends the one-time secret to it in a rendezvous message.
106 106
     </p>
107
-    
107
+
108 108
     <p>
109 109
     At this point it is of special importance that the hidden service sticks to
110 110
     the same set of <a
... ...
@@ -117,10 +117,10 @@
117 117
     <a href="http://freehaven.net/anonbib/#hs-attack06">Locating Hidden
118 118
     Servers</a>.
119 119
     </p>
120
-    
120
+
121 121
     <img alt="Tor hidden service step five" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-5.png">
122 122
     # it should say "Bob connects to Alice's ..."
123
-    
123
+
124 124
     <p>
125 125
     In the last step, the rendezvous point notifies the client about successful
126 126
     connection establishment. After that, both client and hidden service can
... ...
@@ -128,23 +128,23 @@
128 128
     other. The rendezvous point simply relays (end-to-end encrypted) messages
129 129
     from client to service and vice versa.
130 130
     </p>
131
-    
131
+
132 132
     <p>
133 133
     One of the reasons for not using the introduction circuit
134 134
     for actual communication is that no single relay should
135 135
     appear to be responsible for a given hidden service. This is why the
136 136
     rendezvous point never learns about the hidden service's identity.
137 137
     </p>
138
-    
138
+
139 139
     <p>
140 140
     In general, the complete connection between client and hidden service
141 141
     consists of 6 relays: 3 of them were picked by the client with the third
142 142
     being the rendezvous point and the other 3 were picked by the hidden
143 143
     service.
144 144
     </p>
145
-    
145
+
146 146
     <img alt="Tor hidden service step six" src="$(IMGROOT)/THS-6.png">
147
-    
147
+
148 148
     <p>
149 149
     There are more detailed descriptions about the hidden service protocol than
150 150
     this one. See the
... ...
@@ -162,4 +162,4 @@
162 162
   <!-- END SIDECOL -->
163 163
 </div>
164 164
 <!-- END CONTENT -->
165
-#include <foot.wmi>  
165
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ transport API</a>, to make it easier to build interoperable programs.
146 146
 
147 147
     <hr>
148 148
     <a id="download"></a>
149
-    <h2><a href="<page download/download-easy>">Download the Pluggable Transports Tor Browser Bundle</a></h2>
149
+    <h2><a href="<page download/download-easy>">Download the Pluggable Transports Tor Browser</a></h2>
150 150
     <p>
151 151
     As of Tor Browser 3.6-beta-1, pluggable transports are now included in the
152 152
 <a href="<page download/download-easy>">official
... ...
@@ -18,8 +18,8 @@
18 18
     page</a>.  We've included some sample commands and configuration below
19 19
     to make the initial setup and ongoing maintenance a minimal effort.
20 20
     The Tor website and distribution directory currently require roughly
21
-    24GB of disk space, but this number can fluctuate. Expect space
22
-    requirements of up to 30 GB.
21
+    30 GB of disk space, but this number can fluctuate. Expect space
22
+    requirements of up to 50 GB.
23 23
     </p>
24 24
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#sysconfig">Configuring your System</a></h2>
25 25
     <p>
... ...
@@ -14,18 +14,19 @@
14 14
 
15 15
     <p>The signing keys we use are:</p>
16 16
     <ul>
17
+    <li>The Tor Browser Developers (0x93298290),
18
+    Mike Perry (0x0E3A92E4), Georg Koppen (0x4B7C3223),
19
+    Nicolas Vigier (0xD0220E4B) and Linus Nordberg (0x23291265)
20
+    sign the Tor Browser releases.</li>
17 21
     <li>Roger Dingledine (0x28988BF5 and 0x19F78451) or Nick Mathewson
18 22
     (0x165733EA, or its subkey 0x8D29319A) sign the Tor source code
19 23
     tarballs.</li>
20
-    <li>Erinn Clark (0x63FEE659) signs the Tor Browser Bundles
21
-    and many other packages. She signs RPMs with her other key
24
+    <li>Erinn Clark (0x63FEE659) signed earlier Tor Browser Bundles
25
+    and many other packages, and used to sign RPMs with her other key
22 26
     (0xF1F5C9B5). Andrew Lewman (0x31B0974B, 0x6B4D6475) used to sign
23 27
     packages for RPMs, Windows, and OS X.</li>
24 28
     <li>Tor Project Archive (0x886DDD89) signs the deb.torproject.org
25 29
     repositories and archives.</li>
26
-    <li>Mike Perry (0x0E3A92E4), Georg Koppen (0x4B7C3223),
27
-    Nicolas Vigier (0xD0220E4B), Linus Nordberg (0x23291265), and the
28
-    Tor Browser Developers (0x93298290) sign the Tor Browser releases.</li>
29 30
     <li>Damian Johnson (0x9ABBEEC6) signs Arm releases.</li>
30 31
     <li>Sebastian Hahn (0xC5AA446D), and David Fifield (0xC11F6276) sign Pluggable Transport Tor Browser Bundles. Sometimes Sebastian signs the Tor Browser Bundles.</li>
31 32
     <li>The Tails team (0xBE2CD9C1) signs the Tails live system
... ...
@@ -8,102 +8,84 @@
8 8
     <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
9 9
     <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
10 10
     <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-osx>">Mac OS X Client</a>
11
-  </div> 
11
+  </div>
12 12
   <div id="maincol">
13 13
     <h1>Running Tor on Mac OS X</h1>
14 14
     <br>
15
-    
15
+
16 16
     <h2>These are advanced installation instructions for running
17 17
     Tor in a command line. The recommended way to use Tor is to simply download the
18
-    <a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser Bundle</a> and you
18
+    <a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser</a> and you
19 19
     are done.
20 20
     </h2>
21
-    
22
-    <p>Even though the Tor Browser Bundle comes with a regular Tor, and you could use the graphical interface to configure Tor as a relay and bridge easily, it will only run as long as you keep the Tor Browser open. The following instructions will set up Tor without graphical interface or a browser. Many people prefer this over TBB when they host hidden services or relay traffic for other Tor users. 
23
-    <hr>
21
+
22
+    <p>Even though the Tor Browser comes with a regular Tor, it will only run
23
+    as long as you keep the Tor Browser open. The following instructions will
24
+    set up Tor without graphical interface or a browser. Many people prefer
25
+    this over TBB when they host hidden services or relay traffic for other Tor
26
+    users.  <hr>
24 27
     <a id="installing"></a>
25
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#installing">Step One: Install Homebrew</a></h2>
28
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#installing">Step One: Install Macports</a></h2>
26 29
     <br>
27
-    
30
+
28 31
     <p>
29
-    The advanced Tor without any graphical user interface can be installed using <a href="http://brew.sh">the Homebrew package manager</a>. It is most suitable if you want to use Tor as a SOCKS proxy for applications other than web browsing, or run a Tor relay/bridge to help other Tor users. If you use the command-line Tor, you might be interested in <a href="<page projects/arm>">arm</a>, a command-line Tor monitor.
32
+    Macports is a package manager for Mac OS X which provides a Tor package,
33
+    along a lot of other stuff. Follow the instructions on <a
34
+    href="https://www.macports.org/install.php">its Website</a> to install.
30 35
     </p>
31
-    
32
-    <p>If you don't have Homebrew installed, open a terminal window and run:</p>
33
- 
34
-    <pre>ruby -e "$(curl -fsSkL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)"</pre>
35
-    
36
+
36 37
     <hr>
37 38
     <h2>Step Two: Install Tor</a></h2>
38 39
     <br>
39
-    
40
-    <p>In a terminal window, run:</p>
41 40
 
42
-    <pre>brew install tor</pre>
43
- 
44
-    <p>You will find the Tor configuration file at <tt>/usr/local/etc/tor/torrc</tt>.</p>
45
- 
46
-    <hr>
47
-    <a id="verify"></a>
48
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#verify">Step Three: Verify your download</a></h2>
49
-  
50
-    <p>As with any application, you should make sure it came unmodified from the orginal source. Unfortunately, Homebrew does not come with integrated verification for downloads, and anyone could submit a modified Tor! Currently, we don't have good instructions on how to verify the Tor download on Mac OSX. If you think you do, please <a href="<page about/contact>">let us know</a>!</p>
41
+    <p>In a Terminal window, run:</p>
42
+
43
+    <pre>sudo port install tor</pre>
44
+
45
+    <p>You will find a sample Tor configuration file at
46
+    <tt>/opt/local/etc/tor/torrc.sample</tt>. Remove the .sample extension to
47
+    make it effective.</p>
51 48
 
52 49
     <hr>
53
-    <a id="using"></a> 
54
-    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#using">Step Four: Configure your application to use Tor</a></h2>
55
-    
50
+    <a id="using"></a>
51
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#using">Step Three: Configure your application to use Tor</a></h2>
52
+
56 53
     <p>
57
-    If you want to use Tor for anonymous web browsing, please use the <a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser Bundle</a>. It comes with readily configured Tor and a browser patched for better anonymity. To use SOCKS directly (for instant messaging, Jabber, IRC, etc),
58
-    you can point your application directly at Tor (localhost
59
-    port 9050), but see <a href="<wikifaq>#SOCKSAndDNS">this FAQ
60
-    entry</a> for why this may be dangerous. For applications
61
-    that support neither SOCKS nor HTTP, take a look at <a
62
-    href="http://www.dest-unreach.org/socat/">socat</a>.</p>
63
-    
54
+    To use SOCKS directly (for instant messaging, Jabber, IRC, etc), you can
55
+    point your application directly at Tor (localhost port 9050), but see <a
56
+    href="<wikifaq>#SOCKSAndDNS">this FAQ entry</a> for why this may be
57
+    dangerous. For applications that support neither SOCKS nor HTTP, take a
58
+    look at <a href="http://www.dest-unreach.org/socat/">socat</a>.</p>
59
+
64 60
     <p>For information on how to Torify other applications, check out the
65 61
     <a href="<wiki>doc/TorifyHOWTO">Torify HOWTO</a>.
66 62
     </p>
67
-    
68
-    <p>If you have a personal firewall that limits your computer's
69
-    ability to connect to itself, be sure to allow connections from
70
-    your local applications to local port 9050. If your
71
-    firewall blocks outgoing connections, punch a hole so it can
72
-    connect to at least TCP ports 80 and 443, and then see <a
73
-    href="<wikifaq>#FirewalledClient">this FAQ entry</a>.
63
+
64
+    <p>If you have a personal firewall that limits your computer's ability to
65
+    connect to itself, be sure to allow connections from your local
66
+    applications to local port 9050. If your firewall blocks outgoing
67
+    connections, punch a hole so it can connect to at least TCP ports 80 and
68
+    443, and then see <a href="<wikifaq>#FirewalledClient">this FAQ entry</a>.
74 69
     </p>
75
-    
70
+
76 71
     <p>If it's still not working, look at <a
77 72
     href="<page docs/faq>#DoesntWork">this FAQ entry</a> for hints.</p>
78
-    
73
+
79 74
     <p>
80 75
     Once it's working, learn more about <a href="<page
81 76
     download/download>#Warning">what Tor does and does not offer</a>.
82 77
     </p>
83
-    
78
+
84 79
     <hr>
85 80
     <a id="server"></a>
86 81
     <a id="relay"></a>
87 82
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#relay">Configure Tor as a relay</a></h2>
88 83
     <br>
89
-    
90
-    <p>The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. The more
91
-    people who run relays, the faster the Tor network will be. If you have
92
-    at least 50 kilobytes/s each way, please help out Tor by configuring your
93
-    Tor to be a relay too. We have many features that make Tor relays easy
94
-    and convenient, including rate limiting for bandwidth, exit policies so
95
-    you can limit your exposure to abuse complaints, and support for dynamic
96
-    IP addresses.</p>
97
-    
98
-    <p>Having relays in many different places on the Internet is what
99
-    makes Tor users secure. <a href="<wikifaq>#RelayAnonymity">You may
100
-    also get stronger anonymity yourself</a>, since remote sites can't
101
-    know whether connections originated at your computer or were relayed
102
-    from others.</p>
103
-    
104
-    <p>Read more at our <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">Configuring a relay</a>
105
-    guide.</p>
106
-    
84
+
85
+    <p>The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. If you
86
+    want to help <strong>make the Tor network faster</strong>, please
87
+    consider <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">running a relay</a>.</p>
88
+
107 89
     <hr>
108 90
     <a id="uninstall"></a>
109 91
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#uninstall">How To Uninstall Tor</a></h2>
... ...
@@ -112,22 +94,11 @@
112 94
     <p>Change your application proxy settings back to their original
113 95
     values.  If you just want to stop using Tor, you can end at this
114 96
     point.</p>
115
-    
116
-    <p>If you want to completely remove Tor, and your account has Admin
117
-    Privileges, then proceed as follows:</p>
118
-    
119
-    <ol>
120
-    <li>Open Finder and click on Applications.</li>
121
-    <li>Drag /Applications/TorBrowser to the Trash.</li>
122
-    <li>Remove /Library/Torbutton from your system.</li>
123
-    </ol>
124
-    
125
-    <p>Tor Browser is now completely removed from your system.</p>
126
-    
127
-    <hr>
128
-    
129
-    <p>If you have suggestions for improving this document, please <a
130
-    href="<page about/contact>">send them to us</a>. Thanks!</p>
97
+
98
+    <p>If you want to completely remove Tor, type into a Terminal window:</p>
99
+
100
+    <pre>sudo port uninstall tor</pre>
101
+
131 102
   </div>
132 103
   <!-- END MAINCOL -->
133 104
   <div id = "sidecol">
... ...
@@ -137,4 +108,4 @@
137 108
   <!-- END SIDECOL -->
138 109
 </div>
139 110
 <!-- END CONTENT -->
140
-#include <foot.wmi>  
111
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -18,12 +18,12 @@
18 18
     <p>
19 19
     The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. The more
20 20
     people who run relays, the faster the Tor network will be. If you have
21
-    at least 250 kilobytes/s each way, please help out Tor by configuring your
22
-    Tor to be a relay too.
21
+    at least 2 megabits/s for both upload and download, please help out
22
+    Tor by configuring your Tor to be a relay too.
23 23
     </p>
24 24
 
25 25
     <p>You can run a Tor relay on pretty much any operating system. Tor relays
26
-    work best on Linux, OS X Tiger or later, FreeBSD 5.x+, NetBSD 5.x+, and
26
+    work best on Linux, OS X Lion or later, FreeBSD 5.x+, NetBSD 5.x+, and
27 27
     Windows Server 2003 or later.
28 28
     </p>
29 29
 
... ...
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@
27 27
     <p>
28 28
     The latest release of Tor can be found on the <a
29 29
     href="<page download/download>">download</a> page. We have packages for Debian,
30
-    Red Hat, Gentoo, *BSD, etc there too. If you're
30
+    Red Hat, Gentoo, etc there too. If you're
31 31
     using Ubuntu, don't use the default packages: use <a
32 32
     href="<page docs/debian>#ubuntu">our deb repository</a> instead.
33 33
     Similarly, CentOS / Fedora users should use <a href="<page
... ...
@@ -91,23 +91,9 @@
91 91
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#relay">Step Three: Configure it as a relay</a></h2>
92 92
     <br>
93 93
     
94
-    <p>The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. The more
95
-    people who run relays, the faster the Tor network will be. If you have
96
-    at least 50 KiloBytes/s each way, please help out Tor by configuring your
97
-    Tor to be a relay too. We have many features that make Tor relays easy
98
-    and convenient, including rate limiting for bandwidth, exit policies so
99
-    you can limit your exposure to abuse complaints, and support for dynamic
100
-    IP addresses.</p>
101
-    
102
-    <p>Having relays in many different places on
103
-    the Internet is what makes Tor users secure. <a
104
-    href="<wikifaq>#DoIgetbetteranonymityifIrunarelay">You may also
105
-    get stronger anonymity yourself</a>, since remote sites can't know
106
-    whether connections originated at your computer or were relayed
107
-    from others.</p>
108
-
109
-    <p>Read more at our <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">Configuring a relay</a>
110
-    guide.</p>
94
+    <p>The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. If you
95
+    want to help <strong>make the Tor network faster</strong>, please
96
+    consider <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">running a relay</a>.</p>
111 97
     
112 98
     <hr>
113 99
     
... ...
@@ -11,8 +11,8 @@
11 11
     <a href="<page index>">Home &raquo; </a>
12 12
     <a href="<page docs/documentation>">Documentation &raquo; </a>
13 13
     <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-windows>">Windows Client</a>
14
-  </div> 
15
-  <div id="maincol"> 
14
+  </div>
15
+  <div id="maincol">
16 16
     <h1>Running the <a href="<page index>">Tor</a> client on Microsoft Windows</h1>
17 17
     <br>
18 18
 
... ...
@@ -21,50 +21,25 @@
21 21
     href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser</a> and you
22 22
     are done.
23 23
     </h2>
24
-    
25
-    <p>
26
-    <b>If you want to relay traffic for others to help the network grow (please
27
-    do), read the <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">Configuring a relay</a>
28
-    guide.</b>
29
-    </p>
30
-        
31
-    <p>If it's still not working, look at <a
32
-    href="<page docs/faq>#DoesntWork">this
33
-    FAQ entry</a> for hints.</p>
34
-    
24
+
25
+    <p>If it's not working, look at <a href="<page
26
+    docs/faq>#DoesntWork">this FAQ entry</a> for hints.</p>
27
+
35 28
     <p>
36 29
     Once it's working, learn more about
37 30
     <a href="<page download/download>#Warning">what Tor does and does not offer</a>.
38 31
     </p>
39
-    
32
+
40 33
     <hr>
41 34
     <a id="server"></a>
42 35
     <a id="relay"></a>
43 36
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#relay">Configuring Tor as a relay</a></h2>
44 37
     <br>
45
-    
46
-    <p>The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. The more
47
-    people who run relays, the faster the Tor network will be. If you have
48
-    at least 250 KiloBytes/s each way, please help out Tor by configuring your
49
-    Tor to be a relay too. We have many features that make Tor relays easy
50
-    and convenient, including rate limiting for bandwidth, exit policies so
51
-    you can limit your exposure to abuse complaints, and support for dynamic
52
-    IP addresses.</p>
53
-    
54
-    <p>Having relays in many different places on the Internet is what
55
-    makes Tor users secure. <a
56
-    href="<wikifaq>#RelayAnonymity">You
57
-    may also get stronger anonymity yourself</a>,
58
-    since remote sites can't know whether connections originated at your
59
-    computer or were relayed from others.</p>
60
-    
61
-    <p>Read more at our <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">Configuring a relay</a>
62
-    guide.</p>
63
-    
64
-    <hr>
65
-    
66
-    <p>If you have suggestions for improving this document, please <a
67
-    href="<page about/contact>">send them to us</a>. Thanks!</p>
38
+
39
+    <p>The Tor network relies on volunteers to donate bandwidth. If you
40
+    want to help <strong>make the Tor network faster</strong>, please
41
+    consider <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">running a relay</a>.</p>
42
+
68 43
   </div>
69 44
   <!-- END MAINCOL -->
70 45
   <div id = "sidecol">
... ...
@@ -74,4 +49,4 @@
74 49
   <!-- END SIDECOL -->
75 50
 </div>
76 51
 <!-- END CONTENT -->
77
-#include <foot.wmi>  
52
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -216,16 +216,20 @@
216 216
     Apache, and learn something about your operating system.</li>
217 217
     <li>If your computer isn't online all the time, your hidden service
218 218
     won't be either. This leaks information to an observant adversary.</li>
219
-    <li>It is generally a better idea to host hidden services on a Tor client 
219
+    <li>It is generally a better idea to host hidden services on a Tor client
220 220
     rather than a Tor relay, since relay uptime and other properties are
221 221
     publicly visible.</li>
222
-    <!-- increased risks over time -->
222
+    <li>The longer a hidden is online, the higher the risk that its
223
+    location is discovered. The most prominent attacks are building a
224
+    profile of the hidden service's availability and matching induced
225
+    traffic patterns.</li>
223 226
     </ul>
224 227
 
225
-    <hr>
226
-
227
-    <p>If you have suggestions for improving this document, please <a
228
-    href="<page about/contact>">send them to us</a>. Thanks!</p>
228
+    <p>Another common issue is whether to use HTTPS on your relay or
229
+    not. Have a look at this <a
230
+    href="https://blog.torproject.org/blog/facebook-hidden-services-and-https-certs">post</a>
231
+    on the Tor Blog to learn more about these issues.
232
+    </p>
229 233
   </div>
230 234
   <!-- END MAINCOL -->
231 235
   <div id = "sidecol">
... ...
@@ -235,4 +239,4 @@
235 239
   <!-- END SIDECOL -->
236 240
 </div>
237 241
 <!-- END CONTENT -->
238
-#include <foot.wmi>  
242
+#include <foot.wmi>
... ...
@@ -53,8 +53,8 @@
53 53
     package and the extension ".asc". These .asc files are GPG
54 54
     signatures. They allow you to verify the file you've downloaded
55 55
     is exactly the one that we intended you to get. For example,
56
-    tor-browser-2.3.25-13_en-US.exe is accompanied by
57
-    tor-browser-2.3.25-13_en-US.exe.asc. For a list
56
+    torbrowser-install-<version-torbrowserbundle>_en-US.exe is accompanied by
57
+    torbrowser-install-<version-torbrowserbundle>_en-US.exe.asc. For a list
58 58
     of which developer signs which package, see our <a href="<page docs/signing-keys>">signing keys</a> page.</p>
59 59
     <h3>Windows</h3>
60 60
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -67,35 +67,37 @@
67 67
     you will need to tell Windows the full path to the GnuPG program. If
68 68
     you installed GnuPG with the default values, the path should be
69 69
     something like this: <i>C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe</i>.</p>
70
-    <p>Erinn Clark signs the Tor Browsers. Import her key
71
-    (0x416F061063FEE659) by starting <i>cmd.exe</i> and typing:</p>
72
-    <pre>"C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe" --keyserver x-hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --recv-keys 0x416F061063FEE659</pre>
70
+    <p>The Tor Browser team signs the Tor Browsers. Import its key
71
+    (0x4E2C6E8793298290) by starting <i>cmd.exe</i> and typing:</p>
72
+    <pre>"C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe" --keyserver x-hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --recv-keys 0x4E2C6E8793298290</pre>
73 73
     <p>After importing the key, you can verify that the fingerprint
74 74
     is correct:</p>
75
-    <pre>"C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe" --fingerprint 0x416F061063FEE659</pre>
75
+    <pre>"C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe" --fingerprint 0x4E2C6E8793298290</pre>
76 76
     <p>You should see:</p>
77 77
     <pre>
78
-    pub   2048R/63FEE659 2003-10-16
79
-          Key fingerprint = 8738 A680 B84B 3031 A630  F2DB 416F 0610 63FE E659
80
-    uid                  Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@torproject.org&gt;
81
-    uid                  Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@debian.org&gt;
82
-    uid                  Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@double-helix.org&gt;
83
-    sub   2048R/EB399FD7 2003-10-16
78
+    pub   4096R/93298290 2014-12-15
79
+          Key fingerprint = EF6E 286D DA85 EA2A 4BA7  DE68 4E2C 6E87 9329 8290
80
+    uid                  Tor Browser Developers (signing key) <torbrowser@torproject.org>
81
+    sub   4096R/F65C2036 2014-12-15
82
+    sub   4096R/D40814E0 2014-12-15
83
+    sub   4096R/589839A3 2014-12-15
84 84
 </pre>
85 85
     <p>To verify the signature of the package you downloaded, you will need
86 86
     to download the ".asc" file as well. Assuming you downloaded the
87 87
     package and its signature to your Desktop, run:</p>
88
-    <pre>"C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe" --verify C:\Users\Alice\Desktop\tor-browser-2.3.25-13_en-US.exe.asc C:\Users\Alice\Desktop\tor-browser-2.3.25-13_en-US.exe</pre>
88
+    <pre>"C:\Program Files\Gnu\GnuPg\gpg.exe" --verify C:\Users\Alice\Desktop\torbrowser-install-<version-torbrowserbundle>_en-US.exe.asc C:\Users\Alice\Desktop\torbrowser-install-<version-torbrowserbundle>_en-US.exe</pre>
89 89
     <p>The output should say "Good signature": </p>
90 90
     <pre>
91
-    gpg: Signature made Wed 31 Aug 2011 06:37:01 PM EDT using RSA key ID 63FEE659
92
-    gpg: Good signature from "Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@torproject.org&gt;"
93
-    gpg:                 aka "Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@debian.org&gt;"
94
-    gpg:                 aka "Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@double-helix.org&gt;"
91
+    gpg: Signature made Tue 24 Jan 2015 09:29:09 AM CET using RSA key ID D40814E0
92
+    gpg: Good signature from "Tor Browser Developers (signing key) <torbrowser@torproject.org>"
95 93
     gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature!
96 94
     gpg:          There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner.
97
-    Primary key fingerprint: 8738 A680 B84B 3031 A630  F2DB 416F 0610 63FE E659
98
-    </pre>
95
+    Primary key fingerprint: EF6E 286D DA85 EA2A 4BA7  DE68 4E2C 6E87 9329 8290</pre>
96
+    <p>Currently valid subkey fingerprints are:
97
+    <pre>
98
+    5242 013F 02AF C851 B1C7  36B8 7017 ADCE F65C 2036
99
+    BA1E E421 BBB4 5263 180E  1FC7 2E1A C68E D408 14E0
100
+    05FA 4425 3F6C 19A8 B7F5  18D4 2D00 0988 5898 39A3</pre></p>
99 101
     <p>
100 102
     Notice that there is a warning because you haven't assigned a trust
101 103
     index to this person. This means that GnuPG verified that the key made
... ...
@@ -103,54 +105,60 @@
103 105
     to the developer. The best method is to meet the developer in person and
104 106
     exchange key fingerprints.
105 107
     </p>
106
-    <h3>Mac OS X</h3>
108
+    <h3>Mac OS X and Linux</h3>
107 109
     <hr>
108 110
 
109 111
     <p>You need to have GnuPG installed before you can verify
110
-    signatures. You can install it from <a
111
-    href="http://www.gpgtools.org/">http://www.gpgtools.org/</a>.
112
+    signatures. If you are using Mac OS X, you can install it from <a
113
+    href="http://www.gpgtools.org/">http://www.gpgtools.org/</a>. If you
114
+    are using Linux, then it's probably you already have GnuPG in your
115
+    system, as most Linux distributions come with it preinstalled.
112 116
     </p>
113 117
 
114
-    <p>Once it's installed, use GnuPG to import the key that signed
115
-    your package. Erinn Clark signs the Tor Browsers. Import her
116
-    key (0x416F061063FEE659) by starting the terminal (under "Applications")
117
-    and typing:</p>
118
+    <p>The next step is to use GnuPG to import the key that signed
119
+    your package. The Tor Browser team signs the Tor Browsers. Import its
120
+    key (0x4E2C6E8793298290) by starting the terminal (under "Applications"
121
+    in Mac OS X) and typing:</p>
118 122
 
119
-    <pre>gpg --keyserver x-hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --recv-keys 0x416F061063FEE659</pre>
123
+    <pre>gpg --keyserver x-hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net --recv-keys 0x4E2C6E8793298290</pre>
120 124
 
121 125
     <p>After importing the key, you can verify that the fingerprint
122 126
     is correct:</p>
123 127
 
124
-    <pre>gpg --fingerprint 0x416F061063FEE659</pre>
128
+    <pre>gpg --fingerprint 0x4E2C6E8793298290</pre>
125 129
 
126 130
     <p>You should see:</p>
127 131
     <pre>
128
-    pub   2048R/63FEE659 2003-10-16
129
-          Key fingerprint = 8738 A680 B84B 3031 A630  F2DB 416F 0610 63FE E659
130
-    uid                  Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@torproject.org&gt;
131
-    uid                  Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@debian.org&gt;
132
-    uid                  Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@double-helix.org&gt;
133
-    sub   2048R/EB399FD7 2003-10-16
132
+    pub   4096R/93298290 2014-12-15
133
+          Key fingerprint = EF6E 286D DA85 EA2A 4BA7  DE68 4E2C 6E87 9329 8290
134
+    uid                  Tor Browser Developers (signing key) <torbrowser@torproject.org>
135
+    sub   4096R/F65C2036 2014-12-15
136
+    sub   4096R/D40814E0 2014-12-15
137
+    sub   4096R/589839A3 2014-12-15
134 138
     </pre>
135 139
 
136 140
     <p>To verify the signature of the package you downloaded, you will need
137 141
     to download the ".asc" file as well. Assuming you downloaded the
138 142
     package and its signature to your Desktop, run:</p>
139 143
 
140
-    <pre>gpg --verify ~/Desktop/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx32>-osx32_en-US.dmg{.asc*,}</pre>
144
+    <strong>For Mac OS X users</strong>:<br />
145
+    <pre>gpg --verify ~/Desktop/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx64_en-US.dmg{.asc*,}</pre>
146
+    
147
+    <strong>For Linux users</strong> (change 32 to 64 if you have the 64-bit package):<br />
148
+    <pre>gpg --verify ~/Desktop/tor-browser-linux32-<version-torbrowserbundlelinux32>_en-US.tar.xz{.asc*,}</pre>
141 149
 
142
-    <p>The output should say "Good signature": </p>
150
+    <p>The output should say "Good signature":</p>
143 151
 
144 152
     <pre>
145
-    gpg: Signature made Wed 31 Aug 2011 06:37:01 PM EDT using RSA key ID 63FEE659
146
-    gpg: Good signature from "Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@torproject.org&gt;"
147
-    gpg:                 aka "Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@debian.org&gt;"
148
-    gpg:                 aka "Erinn Clark &lt;erinn@double-helix.org&gt;"
153
+    gpg: Signature made Tue 24 Jan 2015 09:29:09 AM CET using RSA key ID D40814E0
154
+    gpg: Good signature from "Tor Browser Developers (signing key) <torbrowser@torproject.org>"
149 155
     gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature!
150 156
     gpg:          There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner.
151
-    Primary key fingerprint: 8738 A680 B84B 3031 A630  F2DB 416F 0610 63FE E659
152
-    </pre>
153
-
157
+    Primary key fingerprint: EF6E 286D DA85 EA2A 4BA7  DE68 4E2C 6E87 9329 8290</pre> <p> Currently valid subkey fingerprints are:
158
+    <pre>
159
+    5242 013F 02AF C851 B1C7  36B8 7017 ADCE F65C 2036
160
+    BA1E E421 BBB4 5263 180E  1FC7 2E1A C68E D408 14E0
161
+    05FA 4425 3F6C 19A8 B7F5  18D4 2D00 0988 5898 39A3</pre></p>
154 162
     <p>
155 163
     Notice that there is a warning because you haven't assigned a trust
156 164
     index to this person. This means that GnuPG verified that the key made
... ...
@@ -159,26 +167,18 @@
159 167
     exchange key fingerprints.
160 168
     </p>
161 169
 
162
-    <h3>Linux</h3>
163
-    <hr>
164
-
165
-    <p>Most Linux distributions come with gpg preinstalled, so users
166
-    who want to verify the Tor Browser for Linux (or the source
167
-    tarball) can just follow along with the instructions above for
168
-    "Mac OS X". </p>
169
-
170
-    <p>If you're using the <b>Debian</b> Tor (not Tor Browser) packages, you 
171
-    should read the
172
-    instructions on <a href="<page docs/debian>#packages">importing
173
-    these keys to apt</a>.</p>
174
-
175
-    <p>If you're using the <b>RPMs</b> (for Tor, not Tor Browser), you can 
176
-    manually verify the
177
-    signatures on the RPM packages by <pre>rpm -K filename.rpm</pre></p>
170
+    <p>
171
+    If you're a Linux user and you're using the <b>Debian</b> Tor (not Tor
172
+    Browser) packages, you should read the instructions on <a
173
+    href="<page docs/debian>#packages">importing these keys to apt</a>.
174
+    If you're using the <b>RPMs</b> (for Tor, not Tor Browser), you can
175
+    manually verify the signatures on the RPM packages by
176
+    <pre>rpm -K filename.rpm</pre>
177
+    </p>
178 178
 
179 179
     <p>See <a
180 180
     href="http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/">http://www.gnupg.org/documentation/</a>
181
-    to learn more about GPG.</p>
181
+    to learn more about GnuPG.</p>
182 182
 
183 183
     <hr>
184 184
 
... ...
@@ -207,8 +207,9 @@
207 207
       for TBB 3.6.1.</li>
208 208
       <li>Retrieve the signers' GPG keys. This can be done from the command
209 209
       line by entering something like
210
-      <pre>gpg --keyserver keys.mozilla.org --recv-keys 0x29846B3C683686CC</pre>
211
-      (This will bring you developer Mike Perry's public key. Other
210
+      <pre>gpg --keyserver keys.mozilla.org --recv-keys 0x4E2C6E8793298290</pre>
211
+      (This will bring you the public part of the Tor Browser developers'
212
+       signing key. Other
212 213
       developers' key IDs can be found on
213 214
       <a href="<page docs/signing-keys>">this
214 215
       page</a>.)</li>
... ...
@@ -216,6 +217,13 @@
216 217
       <pre>gpg --verify &lt;NAME OF THE SIGNATURE FILE&gt;.asc sha256sums.txt</pre></li>
217 218
       <li>You should see a message like "Good signature from &lt;DEVELOPER
218 219
       NAME&gt;". If you don't, there is a problem. Try these steps again.</li>
220
+      <li>If you want to verify a Windows Tor Browser package you need to first
221
+      strip off the authenticode signature of it. Tools that can be used for
222
+      this purpose are <a href="http://osslsigncode.sourceforge.net">osslsigncode</a> and
223
+      <a href="http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=416175">delcert.exe</a>.
224
+      Assuming you have built e.g. <tt>osslsigncode</tt> on a Linux computer you can enter
225
+      <pre>/path/to/your/osslsigncode remove-signature &#92;
226
+        /path/to/your/&lt;TOR BROWSER FILE NAME&gt;.exe &lt;TOR BROWSER FILE NAME&gt;.exe</pre></li>
219 227
       <li>Now you can take the sha256sum of the Tor Browser package. On
220 228
       Windows you can use the <a href="http://md5deep.sourceforge.net/">
221 229
       hashdeep utility</a> and run
... ...
@@ -244,8 +244,8 @@ Browser window resolution information provides something like
244 244
 information contributes about another factor of 5 (for about 5 resolutions in
245 245
 typical use). In addition, the dimensions and position of the desktop taskbar
246 246
 are available, which can reveal hints on OS information. This boosts the count
247
-by a factor of 5 (for each of the major desktop taskbars - Windows, OSX, KDE
248
-and Gnome, and None). Subtracting the browser content window
247
+by a factor of 5 (for each of the major desktop taskbars - Windows, Mac
248
+OS X, KDE and Gnome, and None). Subtracting the browser content window
249 249
 size from the browser outer window size provide yet more information.
250 250
 Firefox toolbar presence gives about a factor of 8 (3 toolbars on/off give
251 251
 2<superscript>3</superscript>=8). Interface effects such as title bar font size
... ...
@@ -148,8 +148,8 @@ Browser window resolution information provides something like
148 148
 information contributes about another factor of 5 (for about 5 resolutions in
149 149
 typical use). In addition, the dimensions and position of the desktop taskbar
150 150
 are available, which can reveal hints on OS information. This boosts the count
151
-by a factor of 5 (for each of the major desktop taskbars - Windows, OSX, KDE
152
-and Gnome, and None). Subtracting the browser content window
151
+by a factor of 5 (for each of the major desktop taskbars - Windows, Mac
152
+OS X, KDE and Gnome, and None). Subtracting the browser content window
153 153
 size from the browser outer window size provide yet more information.
154 154
 Firefox toolbar presence gives about a factor of 8 (3 toolbars on/off give
155 155
 2<sup>3</sup>=8). Interface effects such as title bar font size
... ...
@@ -259,13 +259,11 @@ href="https://www.dwolla.com/hub/thetorproject">Continue to Dwolla
259 259
         <a href="http://www.ccc.de/">CCC in Germany</a> to provide
260 260
         tax-deductible donations for Europeans:</em></p>
261 261
         <p>Wau Holland Stiftung<br>
262
-        IBAN DE03 5204 0021 0277 281202<br>
263
-        SWIFT BIC COBADEFF520</p>
264
-        <h4>Classic style German account information is:</h4>
265
-        <p>Konto: 2772812-02<br>
266
-        Inhaber: Wau Holland Stiftung<br>
267
-        Bank: Commerzbank Kassel<br>
268
-        BLZ: 52040021</p>
262
+        Commerzbank Kassel<br>
263
+        BLZ: 52040021<br>
264
+        Konto: 2772812-02<br>
265
+        IBAN: DE03 5204 0021 0277 2812 02<br>
266
+        BIC: COBADEFF520 *or* COBADEFFXXX</p>
269 267
         <ul>
270 268
           <li>Residents from any of the 31 <a
271 269
           href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_Euro_Payments_Area">SEPA</a>
... ...
@@ -60,28 +60,46 @@
60 60
 	<div class="package" style="padding-top: 13px; border-top: 0px;">
61 61
 	  <div class="desc">
62 62
 	    <h2>Tor Browser for Mac</h2>
63
-	    <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundleosx32> - OS X (10.6+)</em>
64
-	    <p>Everything you need to safely browse the Internet. This package requires no installation. Just extract it and run.<br /><a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Learn more &raquo;</a></p>
63
+	    <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundleosx64> - OS X (10.6+)</em> <a href="https://blog.torproject.org/category/tags/tbb">Read the release announcements!</a>
64
+	    <p>Everything you need to safely browse the Internet.<br /><a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Learn more &raquo;</a></p>
65 65
 	  </div>
66 66
 	  <form class="downloads">
67
-	    <a class="button osx-tbb" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx32>-osx32_<lang>.dmg"><span class="strong">Download</span><span class="normal"><button-osx-tbb32></span></a>
67
+	    <a class="button osx-tbb" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx64_<lang>.dmg"><span class="strong">Download</span><span class="normal"><button-osx-tbb32></span></a>
68 68
 	    <select name="language" id="osx-tbb" class="lang">
69 69
 #include <lang.wmi>
70 70
 	    </select>
71 71
 	    <div class="sig" style="margin-bottom: 5px;">
72 72
 	      <a class="lang-alt" href="<page projects/torbrowser>#downloads">Other Languages</a>
73
-	      (<a class="osx-tbb-sig" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx32>-osx32_<lang>.dmg.asc">sig</a>) <a class="siginfo" href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>">What's This?</a>
73
+	      (<a class="osx-tbb-sig" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx64_<lang>.dmg.asc">sig</a>) <a class="siginfo" href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>">What's This?</a>
74 74
 	    </div>
75 75
 	  </form>
76 76
 	  <p class="alt-dl">Not Using Mac? Download for <a href="#windows">Windows</a> or <a href="#linux">GNU/Linux</a></p>
77 77
         </div>
78
+        <!-- To update these screenshots: Press Command-Shift-4 and then Spacebar, then click on the window. See #14838. -->
79
+        <table class="howto">
80
+          <tr>
81
+            <th>1. Install</th>
82
+            <th>2. Control-click</th>
83
+            <th>3. Open</th>
84
+          </tr>
85
+          <tr>
86
+            <td><img src="$(IMGROOT)/tbb-macosx-step-1.png" alt="Screenshot showing the contents of the Tor Browser dmg file."></td>
87
+            <td><img src="$(IMGROOT)/tbb-macosx-step-2.png" alt="Screenshot of the Applications folder with the Tor Browser icon."></td>
88
+            <td><img src="$(IMGROOT)/tbb-macosx-step-3.png" alt="Dialog offering to open Tor Browser."></td>
89
+          </tr>
90
+          <tr>
91
+            <td>Drag the Tor Browser icon to the Applications folder and open the Applications folder.</td>
92
+            <td>Control-click on the Tor Browser icon (click the mouse button while pressing the Control key on the keyboard) and choose &ldquo;Open&rdquo;.</td>
93
+            <td>Click &ldquo;Open&rdquo; on the next screen.</td>
94
+          </tr>
95
+        </table>
78 96
       </div>
79 97
 <!-- START LINUX -->
80 98
       <div id="linux" class="easy linux">
81 99
 	<div class="package" style="padding-top: 13px; border-top: 0px;">
82 100
 	  <div class="desc">
83 101
 	    <h2>Tor Browser for GNU/Linux</h2>
84
-	    <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundlelinux32> - Linux, Unix, BSD</em>
102
+	    <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundlelinux32> - Linux, Unix, BSD</em> <a href="https://blog.torproject.org/category/tags/tbb">Read the release announcements!</a>
85 103
 	    <p>Everything you need to safely browse the Internet. This package requires no installation. Just extract it and run.<br />
86 104
 	    <a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Learn more &raquo;</a></p>
87 105
 	  </div>
... ...
@@ -103,7 +121,7 @@
103 121
 	<div class="package" style="padding-top: 13px; border-top: 0px;">
104 122
 	  <div class="desc">
105 123
 	    <h2>Tor Browser for 64-Bit GNU/Linux</h2>
106
-	    <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundlelinux64> - Linux, Unix, BSD (64-Bit)</em>
124
+	    <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundlelinux64> - Linux, Unix, BSD (64-Bit)</em> <a href="https://blog.torproject.org/category/tags/tbb">Read the release announcements!</a>
107 125
 	    <p>Everything you need to safely browse the Internet. This package requires no installation. Just extract it and run.<br /><a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Learn more &raquo;</a></p>
108 126
 	  </div>
109 127
 	  <form class="downloads">
... ...
@@ -81,16 +81,16 @@ you are used to. Please read the <a href="#warning">full list of warnings</a> fo
81 81
 #<!-- NOTE - change language enabled button text at the top of this page -->
82 82
 	<div class="package" style="padding-top: 13px; border-top: 0px;">
83 83
 	  <form class="downloads">
84
-	    <a class="button osx-tbb" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx32>-osx32_<lang>.dmg"><span class="strong">Download</span><span class="normal"><button-osx-tbb32></span></a>
84
+	    <a class="button osx-tbb" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx64_<lang>.dmg"><span class="strong">Download</span><span class="normal"><button-osx-tbb32></span></a>
85 85
 	    <select name="language" id="osx-tbb" class="lang">
86 86
 #include <lang.wmi>
87 87
 	    </select>
88 88
 	    <div class="sig">
89 89
 	      <a class="lang-alt" href="<page projects/torbrowser>#downloads">Other Languages</a>
90
-	      (<a class="osx-tbb-sig" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx32>-osx32_<lang>.dmg.asc">sig</a>) <a class="siginfo" href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>">What's This?</a>
90
+	      (<a class="osx-tbb-sig" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx64_<lang>.dmg.asc">sig</a>) <a class="siginfo" href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>">What's This?</a>
91 91
 	    </div>
92 92
 	    <a class="additional" href="<page projects/torbrowser>#downloads-alpha">Download Unstable</a><br />
93
-# Comment out until 64-bit OSX bundles are available again
93
+# Comment out until 64-bit Mac OS X bundles are available again
94 94
 #	    <a class="button osx-tbb64" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx-x86_64-<lang>.zip"><span class="strong">Download</span><span class="normal"><button-osx-tbb64></span></a>
95 95
 #	    <select name="language" id="osx-tbb64" class="lang">
96 96
 
... ...
@@ -98,7 +98,7 @@ you are used to. Please read the <a href="#warning">full list of warnings</a> fo
98 98
 #	    </select>
99 99
 #	    <div class="sig">
100 100
 #	      <a class="lang-alt" href="<page projects/torbrowser>#downloads">Other Languages</a>
101
-#<!-- OSX 64. -EC
101
+#<!-- Mac OS X 64. -EC
102 102
 #	      (<a class="osx-tbb64-sig" href="../dist/torbrowser/<version-torbrowserbundledir>/TorBrowser-<version-torbrowserbundleosx64>-osx-x86_64-<lang>.zip.asc">sig</a>) <a class="siginfo" href="<page docs/verifying-signatures>">What's This?</a>
103 103
 #	    </div>
104 104
 #	    <a href="<page projects/torbrowser-details>#build">Source Code</a><br />
... ...
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ you are used to. Please read the <a href="#warning">full list of warnings</a> fo
107 107
 	  </form>
108 108
 
109 109
 	  <h2>Tor Browser</h2>
110
-	  <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundleosx32> - OS X Intel</em>
110
+	  <em>Version <version-torbrowserbundleosx64> - OS X Intel</em>
111 111
 	  <p>Everything you need to safely browse the Internet. This package requires no installation. Just extract it and run. <a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Learn more &raquo;</a></p>
112 112
 	</div>
113 113
   </div>
... ...
@@ -55,42 +55,12 @@ you.</a></li>
55 55
 <p>You can run Tor as either a relay or a bridge. A bridge will usually
56 56
 see less traffic than a relay, and will only be the first hop in the
57 57
 three hop circuit. </p>
58
+</div>
59
+</div>
58 60
 
59
-<h3>Microsoft Windows</h3>
60
-<ul>
61
-<li>Be a Bridge: <a
62
-href="<package-win32-bridge-bundle-stable>">package</a>, <a
63
-href="<package-win32-bridge-bundle-stable>.asc">signature</a></li>
64
-<li>Be a Relay: <a href="<package-win32-relay-bundle-stable>">package</a>,
65
-<a href="<package-win32-relay-bundle-stable>.asc">signature</a></li>
66
-<li>Be an Exit Relay: <a
67
-href="<package-win32-exit-bundle-stable>">package</a>, <a
68
-href="<package-win32-exit-bundle-stable>.asc">signature</a></li>
69
-</ul>
70
-<p>Read the instructions on how to configure a <a href="<page
71
-docs/bridges>#RunningABridge">bridge</a> or a <a href="<page
72
-docs/tor-doc-relay>#setup">relay</a>.</p>
73
-
74
-<h3>Mac OS X</h3>
75
-<ul>
76
-<li>Be a Bridge (Intel Macs): <a
77
-href="<package-osx-x86-bundle-stable>">package</a>, <a
78
-href="<package-osx-x86-bundle-stable>.asc">signature</a></li>
79
-<li>Be a Bridge (PowerPC Macs ): <a
80
-href="<package-osx-ppc-bundle-stable>">package</a>, <a
81
-href="<package-osx-ppc-bundle-stable>.asc">signature</a></li>
82
-</ul>
83 61
 <p>Read the instructions on how to configure a <a href="<page
84 62
 docs/bridges>#RunningABridge">bridge</a> or a <a href="<page
85 63
 docs/tor-doc-relay>#setup">relay</a>.</p>
86
-
87
-<h3>Unix, Linux, BSD, and everything else</h3>
88
-<p>Read the instructions on how to configure a
89
-<a href="<page docs/tor-relay-debian>">relay</a>
90
-or a <a href="<page docs/bridges>#RunningABridge">bridge</a>.</p>
91
-</div>
92
-</div>
93
-
94 64
 <div class="hundred toptwenty">
95 65
 <div class="dbox donate">
96 66
 <a name="cloud"></a>
... ...
@@ -43,7 +43,9 @@
43 43
 
44 44
     <p>
45 45
     If you get such a mail, or you've done something else cool,
46
-    email us at donations@torproject.org with the details.
46
+    email us at tshirt@torproject.org with the details. There's no need
47
+    to include a mailing address yet, you'll receive a link where you
48
+    can enter your shipping information.
47 49
     </p>
48 50
 
49 51
     <p>
... ...
@@ -405,13 +405,12 @@ meetings around the world.</li>
405 405
     <i><a href="#improveTorTestCoverage">Improve test coverage in Tor</a></i><br />
406 406
     <i><a href="#useMoreCores">Have the Tor daemon use more cores</a></i><br />
407 407
     <i><a href="#improveHiddenServices">Help improve Tor hidden services</a></i><br />
408
-    <i><a href="#improvedDnsSupport">Improved DNS support for Tor</a></i><br />
409
-    <i><a href="#torSandboxing">Help improve Tor sandboxing</a></i>
408
+    <i><a href="#improvedDnsSupport">Improved DNS support for Tor</a></i>
410