Browse code

Use English "singular they" where appropriate

Signed-off-by: hiro <hiro@torproject.org>

Ingo Blechschmidt authored on10/12/2017 14:20:39 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:10:20
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2453,8 +2453,8 @@ exit
2453 2453
     policies are propagated to Tor clients via the directory, so clients
2454 2454
     will automatically avoid picking exit relays that would refuse to
2455 2455
     exit to their intended destination. This way each relay can decide
2456
-    the services, hosts, and networks he wants to allow connections to,
2457
-    based on abuse potential and his own situation. Read the FAQ entry
2456
+    the services, hosts, and networks it wants to allow connections to,
2457
+    based on abuse potential and its own situation. Read the FAQ entry
2458 2458
 on
2459 2459
     <a href="<page docs/faq-abuse>#TypicalAbuses">issues you might
2460 2460
 encounter</a>
... ...
@@ -2931,14 +2931,14 @@ Yes, you do get better anonymity against some attacks.
2931 2931
     </p>
2932 2932
     <p>
2933 2933
 The simplest example is an attacker who owns a small number of Tor relays.
2934
-He will see a connection from you, but he won't be able to know whether
2934
+They will see a connection from you, but they won't be able to know whether
2935 2935
 the connection originated at your computer or was relayed from somebody else.
2936 2936
     </p>
2937 2937
     <p>
2938 2938
 There are some cases where it doesn't seem to help: if an attacker can
2939
-watch all of your incoming and outgoing traffic, then it's easy for him
2939
+watch all of your incoming and outgoing traffic, then it's easy for them
2940 2940
 to learn which connections were relayed and which started at you. (In
2941
-this case he still doesn't know your destinations unless he is watching
2941
+this case they still don't know your destinations unless they are watching
2942 2942
 them too, but you're no better off than if you were an ordinary client.)
2943 2943
     </p>
2944 2944
     <p>
... ...
@@ -2948,7 +2948,7 @@ signal to an attacker that you place a high value on your anonymity.
2948 2948
 Second, there are some more esoteric attacks that are not as
2949 2949
 well-understood or well-tested that involve making use of the knowledge
2950 2950
 that you're running a relay -- for example, an attacker may be able to
2951
-"observe" whether you're sending traffic even if he can't actually watch
2951
+"observe" whether you're sending traffic even if they can't actually watch
2952 2952
 your network, by relaying traffic through your Tor relay and noticing
2953 2953
 changes in traffic timing.
2954 2954
     </p>
... ...
@@ -3475,7 +3475,7 @@ keys,
3475 3475
     locations, exit policies, and so on. So unless the adversary can
3476 3476
 control
3477 3477
     a majority of the directory authorities (as of 2012 there are 8
3478
-    directory authorities), he can't trick the Tor client into using
3478
+    directory authorities), they can't trick the Tor client into using
3479 3479
     other Tor relays.
3480 3480
     </p>
3481 3481
 
... ...
@@ -4213,7 +4213,7 @@ only solution is to have no opinion.
4213 4213
     Like all anonymous communication networks that are fast enough for web
4214 4214
     browsing, Tor is vulnerable to statistical "traffic confirmation"
4215 4215
     attacks, where the adversary watches traffic at both ends of a circuit
4216
-    and confirms his guess that they're communicating. It would be really
4216
+    and confirms their guess that those endpoints are communicating. It would be really
4217 4217
     nice if we could use cover traffic to confuse this attack. But there
4218 4218
     are three problems here:
4219 4219
     </p>
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): new entry: Can I used IPv6 on my relay?

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 18:13:09 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -148,6 +148,7 @@ country)
148 148
     <li><a href="#WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore">Why isn't my relay being
149 149
     used more?</a></li>
150 150
     <li><a href="#IDontHaveAStaticIP">Can I run a Tor relay using a dynamic IP address?</a></li>
151
+    <li><a href="#IPv6Relay">Can I use IPv6 on my relay?</a></li>
151 152
     <li><a href="#PortscannedMore">Why do I get portscanned more often
152 153
     when I run a Tor relay?</a></li>
153 154
     <li><a href="#HighCapacityConnection">How can I get Tor to fully
... ...
@@ -2163,6 +2164,18 @@ the program iptables (for *nix) useful.
2163 2164
 
2164 2165
     <hr>
2165 2166
 
2167
+    <a id="IPv6Relay"></a>
2168
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#IPv6Relay">Can I use IPv6 on my relay?</a></h3>
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+
2170
+    <p>
2171
+    Tor has <a href="<wiki>org/roadmaps/Tor/IPv6Features">partial</a> support for IPv6 and we
2172
+    encourage every relay operator to <a href="<wiki>TorRelayGuide#IPv6">enable IPv6 functionality
2173
+    </a> in their torrc configuration files when IPv6 connectivity is available.
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+    For the time being Tor will require IPv4 addresses on relays, you can not run a Tor relay
2175
+    on a host with IPv6 addresses only.
2176
+    </p>
2177
+
2178
+    <hr>
2166 2179
     <a id="PortscannedMore"></a>
2167 2180
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#PortscannedMore">Why do I get portscanned
2168 2181
     more often when I run a Tor relay?</a></h3>
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): link to new relay guide; link to obfs4 bridge guide

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 17:55:34 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2556,7 +2556,7 @@ relay or bridge relay?</a></h3>
2556 2556
 
2557 2557
     <p><a href="<page docs/bridges>">Bridge relays</a> (or "bridges" for
2558 2558
 short)
2559
-    are <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">Tor relays</a> that aren't
2559
+    are <a href="<wiki>TorRelayGuide">Tor relays</a> that aren't
2560 2560
     listed in the public Tor directory.
2561 2561
     That means that ISPs or governments trying to block access to the
2562 2562
     Tor network can't simply block all bridges.
... ...
@@ -2586,9 +2586,10 @@ lots
2586 2586
     of bandwidth, you should definitely run a normal relay.
2587 2587
     If you're willing
2588 2588
     to <a href="#ExitPolicies">be an exit</a>, you should definitely
2589
-    run a normal relay, since we need more exits. If you can't be an
2590
-    exit and only have a little bit of bandwidth, be a bridge. Thanks
2591
-    for volunteering!
2589
+    run an exit relay, since we need more exits. If you can't be an
2590
+    exit and only have a little bit of bandwidth, setup an
2591
+    <a href="<page docs/pluggable-transports>#operator">obfs4 bridge</a>.
2592
+    Thanks for volunteering!
2592 2593
     </p>
2593 2594
 
2594 2595
     <hr>
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): move two questions out of the relay section

the following two questions have been moved from the relay
to the "Advanced Tor usage" section as they are more client related:

I want to run my Tor client on a different computer than my applications.
Can I install Tor on a central server, and have my clients connect to it?

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 17:37:13 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -132,6 +132,10 @@ country)
132 132
     worry?</a></li>
133 133
     <li><a href="#SocksAndDNS">How do I check if my application that uses
134 134
     SOCKS is leaking DNS requests?</a></li>
135
+    <li><a href="#TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications">I want to run my Tor client on a
136
+    different computer than my applications.</a></li>
137
+    <li><a href="#ServerClient">Can I install Tor on a central server, and
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+    have my clients connect to it?</a></li>
135 139
     </ul>
136 140
 
137 141
     <a id="relay"></a>
... ...
@@ -167,10 +171,6 @@ be?</a></li>
167 171
     Why did that happen?</a></li>
168 172
     <li><a href="#MyRelayRecentlyGotTheGuardFlagAndTrafficDroppedByHalf">My
169 173
     relay recently got the Guard flag and traffic dropped by half.</a></li>
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-    <li><a href="#TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications">I want to run my Tor client on a
171
-    different computer than my applications.</a></li>
172
-    <li><a href="#ServerClient">Can I install Tor on a central server, and
173
-    have my clients connect to it?</a></li>
174 174
     <li><a href="#JoinTheNetwork">So I can just configure a nickname and
175 175
     ORPort and join the network?</a></li>
176 176
     <li><a href="#RelayOrBridge">Should I be a normal relay or bridge
... ...
@@ -2027,6 +2027,80 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
2027 2027
 
2028 2028
     <hr>
2029 2029
 
2030
+    <a id="TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications"></a>
2031
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications">I
2032
+    want to run my Tor client on a different computer than my applications.
2033
+    </a></h3>
2034
+    <p>
2035
+    By default, your Tor client only listens for applications that
2036
+    connect from localhost. Connections from other computers are
2037
+    refused. If you want to torify applications on different computers
2038
+    than the Tor client, you should edit your torrc to define
2039
+    SocksListenAddress 0.0.0.0 and then restart (or hup) Tor. If you
2040
+    want to get more advanced, you can configure your Tor client on a
2041
+    firewall to bind to your internal IP but not your external IP.
2042
+    </p>
2043
+
2044
+    <hr>
2045
+
2046
+    <a id="ServerClient"></a>
2047
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ServerClient">Can I install Tor on a
2048
+    central server, and have my clients connect to it?</a></h3>
2049
+    <p>
2050
+     Yes. Tor can be configured as a client or a relay on another
2051
+     machine, and allow other machines to be able to connect to it
2052
+     for anonymity. This is most useful in an environment where many
2053
+     computers want a gateway of anonymity to the rest of the world.
2054
+     However, be forwarned that with this configuration, anyone within
2055
+     your private network (existing between you and the Tor
2056
+     client/relay) can see what traffic you are sending in clear text.
2057
+     The anonymity doesn't start until you get to the Tor relay.
2058
+     Because of this, if you are the controller of your domain and you
2059
+     know everything's locked down, you will be OK, but this configuration
2060
+     may not be suitable for large private networks where security is
2061
+     key all around.
2062
+    </p>
2063
+    <p>
2064
+Configuration is simple, editing your torrc file's SocksListenAddress
2065
+according to the following examples:
2066
+    </p>
2067
+    <pre>
2068
+
2069
+  #This provides local interface access only,
2070
+  #needs SocksPort to be greater than 0
2071
+  SocksListenAddress 127.0.0.1
2072
+
2073
+  #This provides access to Tor on a specified interface
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+  SocksListenAddress 192.168.x.x:9100
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+
2076
+  #Accept from all interfaces
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+  SocksListenAddress 0.0.0.0:9100
2078
+   </pre>
2079
+    <p>
2080
+You can state multiple listen addresses, in the case that you are
2081
+part of several networks or subnets.
2082
+    </p>
2083
+    <pre>
2084
+  SocksListenAddress 192.168.x.x:9100 #eth0
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+  SocksListenAddress 10.x.x.x:9100 #eth1
2086
+    </pre>
2087
+    <p>
2088
+After this, your clients on their respective networks/subnets would specify
2089
+a socks proxy with the address and port you specified SocksListenAddress
2090
+to be.
2091
+    </p>
2092
+    <p>
2093
+Please note that the SocksPort configuration option gives the port ONLY for
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+localhost (127.0.0.1). When setting up your SocksListenAddress(es), you need
2095
+to give the port with the address, as shown above.
2096
+    <p>
2097
+If you are interested in forcing all outgoing data through the central Tor
2098
+client/relay, instead of the server only being an optional proxy, you may find
2099
+the program iptables (for *nix) useful.
2100
+    </p>
2101
+
2102
+    <hr>
2103
+
2030 2104
     <a id="RunningATorRelay"></a>
2031 2105
     <h2><a class="anchor" href="#RunningATorRelay">Running a Tor relay:</a></h2>
2032 2106
 
... ...
@@ -2476,80 +2550,6 @@ users
2476 2550
 
2477 2551
     <hr>
2478 2552
 
2479
-    <a id="TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications"></a>
2480
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#TorClientOnADifferentComputerThanMyApplications">I
2481
-    want to run my Tor client on a different computer than my applications.
2482
-    </a></h3>
2483
-    <p>
2484
-    By default, your Tor client only listens for applications that
2485
-    connect from localhost. Connections from other computers are
2486
-    refused. If you want to torify applications on different computers
2487
-    than the Tor client, you should edit your torrc to define
2488
-    SocksListenAddress 0.0.0.0 and then restart (or hup) Tor. If you
2489
-    want to get more advanced, you can configure your Tor client on a
2490
-    firewall to bind to your internal IP but not your external IP.
2491
-    </p>
2492
-
2493
-    <hr>
2494
-
2495
-    <a id="ServerClient"></a>
2496
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ServerClient">Can I install Tor on a
2497
-    central server, and have my clients connect to it?</a></h3>
2498
-    <p>
2499
-     Yes. Tor can be configured as a client or a relay on another
2500
-     machine, and allow other machines to be able to connect to it
2501
-     for anonymity. This is most useful in an environment where many
2502
-     computers want a gateway of anonymity to the rest of the world.
2503
-     However, be forwarned that with this configuration, anyone within
2504
-     your private network (existing between you and the Tor
2505
-     client/relay) can see what traffic you are sending in clear text.
2506
-     The anonymity doesn't start until you get to the Tor relay.
2507
-     Because of this, if you are the controller of your domain and you
2508
-     know everything's locked down, you will be OK, but this configuration
2509
-     may not be suitable for large private networks where security is
2510
-     key all around.
2511
-    </p>
2512
-    <p>
2513
-Configuration is simple, editing your torrc file's SocksListenAddress
2514
-according to the following examples:
2515
-    </p>
2516
-    <pre>
2517
-
2518
-  #This provides local interface access only,
2519
-  #needs SocksPort to be greater than 0
2520
-  SocksListenAddress 127.0.0.1
2521
-
2522
-  #This provides access to Tor on a specified interface
2523
-  SocksListenAddress 192.168.x.x:9100
2524
-
2525
-  #Accept from all interfaces
2526
-  SocksListenAddress 0.0.0.0:9100
2527
-   </pre>
2528
-    <p>
2529
-You can state multiple listen addresses, in the case that you are
2530
-part of several networks or subnets.
2531
-    </p>
2532
-    <pre>
2533
-  SocksListenAddress 192.168.x.x:9100 #eth0
2534
-  SocksListenAddress 10.x.x.x:9100 #eth1
2535
-    </pre>
2536
-    <p>
2537
-After this, your clients on their respective networks/subnets would specify
2538
-a socks proxy with the address and port you specified SocksListenAddress
2539
-to be.
2540
-    </p>
2541
-    <p>
2542
-Please note that the SocksPort configuration option gives the port ONLY for
2543
-localhost (127.0.0.1). When setting up your SocksListenAddress(es), you need
2544
-to give the port with the address, as shown above.
2545
-    <p>
2546
-If you are interested in forcing all outgoing data through the central Tor
2547
-client/relay, instead of the server only being an optional proxy, you may find
2548
-the program iptables (for *nix) useful.
2549
-    </p>
2550
-
2551
-    <hr>
2552
-
2553 2553
     <a id="RelayOrBridge"></a>
2554 2554
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#RelayOrBridge">Should I be a normal
2555 2555
 relay or bridge relay?</a></h3>
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): update BadExit question (wiki is obsolete, add email address)

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 16:58:14 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2454,12 +2454,10 @@ users
2454 2454
     the BadExit flag why did that happen?</a></h3>
2455 2455
 
2456 2456
     <p>If you got this flag then we either discovered a problem or suspicious
2457
-    activity coming from your exit and weren't able to contact you. The reason
2458
-    for most flaggings are documented on the <a
2459
-    href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/badRelays">bad
2460
-    relays wiki</a>. Please <a
2461
-    href="<page about/contact>">contact us</a> so
2462
-    we can sort out the issue.</p>
2457
+    activity when routing traffic through your exit and weren't able to contact you.
2458
+    Please reach out to the <a href="mailto:bad-relays@lists.torproject.org">bad-relays team</a>
2459
+    so we can sort out the issue.
2460
+    </p>
2463 2461
 
2464 2462
     <hr>
2465 2463
 
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): refrase static IP section into a question

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 15:46:06 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ country)
143 143
     <li><a href="#MostNeededRelayType">What type of relays are most needed?</a></li>
144 144
     <li><a href="#WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore">Why isn't my relay being
145 145
     used more?</a></li>
146
-    <li><a href="#IDontHaveAStaticIP">I don't have a static IP.</a></li>
146
+    <li><a href="#IDontHaveAStaticIP">Can I run a Tor relay using a dynamic IP address?</a></li>
147 147
     <li><a href="#PortscannedMore">Why do I get portscanned more often
148 148
     when I run a Tor relay?</a></li>
149 149
     <li><a href="#HighCapacityConnection">How can I get Tor to fully
... ...
@@ -2079,8 +2079,8 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
2079 2079
     <hr>
2080 2080
 
2081 2081
     <a id="IDontHaveAStaticIP"></a>
2082
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#IDontHaveAStaticIP">I don't have a static
2083
-    IP.</a></h3>
2082
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#IDontHaveAStaticIP">Can I run a Tor relay using a
2083
+    dynamic IP address?</a></h3>
2084 2084
 
2085 2085
     <p>
2086 2086
     Tor can handle relays with dynamic IP addresses just fine. Just leave
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): NAT is covered in its own section (this section is about stability)

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 15:41:19 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2149,12 +2149,6 @@ from
2149 2149
 your
2150 2150
     relay, you can set it up to only allow connections to other Tor
2151 2151
 relays.
2152
-    </li>
2153
-    <li>If your relay is behind a NAT and it doesn't know its public
2154
-    IP (e.g. it has an IP of 192.168.x.y), you'll need to set up port
2155
-    forwarding. Forwarding TCP connections is system dependent but
2156
-    <a href="#BehindANAT">this FAQ entry</a>
2157
-    offers some examples on how to do this.
2158 2152
     </li>
2159 2153
     <li>Your relay will passively estimate and advertise its recent
2160 2154
     bandwidth capacity, so high-bandwidth relays will attract more users
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): bw shaping is covered in its own section (this section is about stability)

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 15:40:02 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2141,16 +2141,6 @@ need to be?</a></h3>
2141 2141
     sure it's not too often, since connections using the relay when it
2142 2142
     disconnects will break.
2143 2143
     </li>
2144
-    <li>Tor has built-in support for <a
2145
-    href="#BandwidthShaping">
2146
-    rate limiting</a>. Further, if you have a fast
2147
-    link but want to limit the number of bytes per
2148
-    day (or week or month) that you donate, check out the <a
2149
-
2150
-href="#LimitTotalBandwidth">
2151
-hibernation
2152
-    feature</a>.
2153
-    </li>
2154 2144
     <li>Each Tor relay has an <a href="#ExitPolicies">exit policy</a>
2155 2145
 that
2156 2146
     specifies what sort of outbound connections are allowed or refused
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): put most relevant answer in this question at the beginning

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 15:00:25 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2136,6 +2136,11 @@ need to be?</a></h3>
2136 2136
     </p>
2137 2137
 
2138 2138
     <ul>
2139
+    <li>It's fine if the relay goes offline sometimes. The directories
2140
+    notice this quickly and stop advertising the relay. Just try to make
2141
+    sure it's not too often, since connections using the relay when it
2142
+    disconnects will break.
2143
+    </li>
2139 2144
     <li>Tor has built-in support for <a
2140 2145
     href="#BandwidthShaping">
2141 2146
     rate limiting</a>. Further, if you have a fast
... ...
@@ -2154,11 +2159,6 @@ from
2154 2159
 your
2155 2160
     relay, you can set it up to only allow connections to other Tor
2156 2161
 relays.
2157
-    </li>
2158
-    <li>It's fine if the relay goes offline sometimes. The directories
2159
-    notice this quickly and stop advertising the relay. Just try to make
2160
-    sure it's not too often, since connections using the relay when it
2161
-    disconnects will break.
2162 2162
     </li>
2163 2163
     <li>If your relay is behind a NAT and it doesn't know its public
2164 2164
     IP (e.g. it has an IP of 192.168.x.y), you'll need to set up port
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): dynamic IPs are covered in a dedicated answer already

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 14:58:10 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2160,9 +2160,6 @@ relays.
2160 2160
     sure it's not too often, since connections using the relay when it
2161 2161
     disconnects will break.
2162 2162
     </li>
2163
-    <li>We can handle relays with dynamic IPs just fine &mdash; simply
2164
-    leave the Address config option blank, and Tor will try to guess.
2165
-    </li>
2166 2163
     <li>If your relay is behind a NAT and it doesn't know its public
2167 2164
     IP (e.g. it has an IP of 192.168.x.y), you'll need to set up port
2168 2165
     forwarding. Forwarding TCP connections is system dependent but
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): new entry: most wanted relay type

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 14:55:07 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -140,6 +140,7 @@ country)
140 140
 
141 141
     <li><a href="#HowDoIDecide">How do I decide if I should run a relay?
142 142
     </a></li>
143
+    <li><a href="#MostNeededRelayType">What type of relays are most needed?</a></li>
143 144
     <li><a href="#WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore">Why isn't my relay being
144 145
     used more?</a></li>
145 146
     <li><a href="#IDontHaveAStaticIP">I don't have a static IP.</a></li>
... ...
@@ -2043,6 +2044,19 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
2043 2044
 
2044 2045
     <hr>
2045 2046
 
2047
+    <a id="MostNeededRelayType"></a>
2048
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#MostNeededRelayType">What type of relays are most needed?</a></h3>
2049
+    <p>
2050
+    <ul>
2051
+    <li>The exit relay is the most needed relay type but it also comes with the highest legal exposure and risk (and you
2052
+    should NOT run them from your home).</li>
2053
+    <li>If you are looking to run a relay with minimal effort, fast guard relays are also very useful</li>
2054
+    <li>followed by bridges.</li>
2055
+    </ul>
2056
+    </p>
2057
+
2058
+    <hr>
2059
+
2046 2060
     <a id="WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore"></a>
2047 2061
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhyIsntMyRelayBeingUsedMore">Why isn't my
2048 2062
     relay being used more?</a></h3>
Browse code

FAQ (relay section): increase min. bw from 2 to 8 MBit/s and add bridge info

nusenu authored on10/02/2018 14:11:47 • hiro committed on02/04/2018 19:01:41
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2034,9 +2034,11 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
2034 2034
     run a relay?</a></h3>
2035 2035
     <p>
2036 2036
     We're looking for people with reasonably reliable Internet connections,
2037
-    that have at least 250 kilobytes/second each way. If that's you, please
2038
-    consider <a href="https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-relay-debian">helping
2039
-    out</a>.
2037
+    that have at least 1 MByte/second (that is 8 MBit/second) available bandwidth each way. If that's you, please
2038
+    consider <a href="<wiki>TorRelayGuide">running a Tor relay</a>.
2039
+    </p>
2040
+    <p>
2041
+    Even if you do not have at least 8 MBit/s of available bandwidth you can still help the Tor network by running a <a href="<page docs/pluggable-transports>#operator">Tor bridge with obfs4 support</a>. In that case you should have at least 1 MBit/s of available bandwidth.
2040 2042
     </p>
2041 2043
 
2042 2044
     <hr>
Browse code

Bug 24027: update the FAQ to point to the new Tor Browser git repository

Nicolas Vigier authored on07/02/2018 12:41:54
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -1514,7 +1514,7 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1514 1514
     Tor Browser? How do I verify a build?</a></h3>
1515 1515
 
1516 1516
     <p>
1517
-    Start with <a href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/builders/tor-browser-bundle.git">https://gitweb.torproject.org/builders/tor-browser-bundle.git</a> and <a href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/builders/tor-browser-bundle.git/tree/gitian/README.build">https://gitweb.torproject.org/builders/tor-browser-bundle.git/tree/gitian/README.build</a>.
1517
+    Tor Browser is built from the <a href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/builders/tor-browser-build.git/">tor-browser-build.git git repository</a>. You can have a look at the <a href="https://gitweb.torproject.org/builders/tor-browser-build.git/tree/README">README file</a> for the build instructions. There is also some informations in the <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/TorBrowser/Hacking">Tor Browser Hacking Guide</a>.
1518 1518
     </p>
1519 1519
 
1520 1520
 
Browse code

Merge branch 'master' of ssh://git-rw.torproject.org/project/web/webwml into faq-section-anchors

hiromipaw authored on14/12/2017 19:59:13
Showing0 changed files
Browse code

Add hrefs to the heading anchors in the answers. (#24519)

kat authored on11/12/2017 20:12:42
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -287,7 +287,7 @@ things?</a></li>
287 287
     <hr>
288 288
 
289 289
     <a id="General"></a>
290
-    <h2><a class="anchor">General:</a></h2>
290
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#General">General:</a></h2>
291 291
 
292 292
     <a id="WhatIsTor"></a>
293 293
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhatIsTor">What is Tor?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -889,7 +889,7 @@ executive
889 889
     <hr>
890 890
 
891 891
     <a id="CompilationAndInstallation"></a>
892
-    <h2><a class="anchor">Compilation And Installation:</a></h2>
892
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#CompilationAndInstallation">Compilation And Installation:</a></h2>
893 893
 
894 894
     <a id="HowUninstallTor"></a>
895 895
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#HowUninstallTor">How do I uninstall
... ...
@@ -1025,7 +1025,7 @@ bundle that includes Tor?</a></h3>
1025 1025
 <hr>
1026 1026
 
1027 1027
 <a id="TBBGeneral"></a>
1028
-<h2><a class="anchor">Tor Browser (general):</a></h2>
1028
+<h2><a class="anchor" href="#TBBGeneral">Tor Browser (general):</a></h2>
1029 1029
 
1030 1030
 <a id="TBBFlash"></a>
1031 1031
 <h3><a class="anchor" href="#TBBFlash">Why can't I view videos on
... ...
@@ -1380,7 +1380,7 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1380 1380
 <hr>
1381 1381
 
1382 1382
 <a id="TBB3.x"></a>
1383
-<h2><a class="anchor">Tor Browser (3.x and later):</a></h2>
1383
+<h2><a class="anchor" href="#TBB3.x">Tor Browser (3.x and later):</a></h2>
1384 1384
     <a id="WhereDidVidaliaGo"></a>
1385 1385
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhereDidVidaliaGo">Where did the world map
1386 1386
     (Vidalia) go?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -1510,7 +1510,7 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1510 1510
 <hr>
1511 1511
 
1512 1512
 <a id="AdvancedTorUsage"></a>
1513
-<h2><a class="anchor">Advanced Tor usage:</a></h2>
1513
+<h2><a class="anchor" href="#AdvancedTorUsage">Advanced Tor usage:</a></h2>
1514 1514
 
1515 1515
 <a id="torrc"></a>
1516 1516
 <h3><a class="anchor" href="#torrc">I'm supposed to "edit my torrc".
... ...
@@ -2016,7 +2016,7 @@ from the source code release tor-0.2.4.16-rc is:
2016 2016
     <hr>
2017 2017
 
2018 2018
     <a id="RunningATorRelay"></a>
2019
-    <h2><a class="anchor">Running a Tor relay:</a></h2>
2019
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#RunningATorRelay">Running a Tor relay:</a></h2>
2020 2020
 
2021 2021
     <a id="HowDoIDecide"></a>
2022 2022
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#HowDoIDecide">How do I decide if I should
... ...
@@ -3000,7 +3000,7 @@ diversity,
3000 3000
 
3001 3001
 # Leaving in old ids to accomodate incoming links.
3002 3002
 <a id="TorOnionServices"></a><a id="TorHiddenServices"></a>
3003
-<h2><a class="anchor">Tor onion services:</a></h2>
3003
+<h2><a class="anchor" href="#TorOnionServices">Tor onion services:</a></h2>
3004 3004
 
3005 3005
     <a id="AccessOnionServices"></a><a id="AccessHiddenServices"></a>
3006 3006
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AccessOnionServices">How do I access
... ...
@@ -3066,7 +3066,7 @@ diversity,
3066 3066
     <hr>
3067 3067
 
3068 3068
     <a id="Development"></a>
3069
-    <h2><a class="anchor">Development:</a></h2>
3069
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Development">Development:</a></h2>
3070 3070
 
3071 3071
     <a id="VersionNumbers"></a>
3072 3072
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#VersionNumbers">What do these weird
... ...
@@ -3245,7 +3245,7 @@ diversity,
3245 3245
     <hr>
3246 3246
 
3247 3247
     <a id="AnonymityAndSecurity"></a>
3248
-    <h2><a class="anchor">Anonymity And Security:</a></h2>
3248
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#AnonymityAndSecurity">Anonymity And Security:</a></h2>
3249 3249
 
3250 3250
     <a id="WhatProtectionsDoesTorProvide"></a>
3251 3251
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#WhatProtectionsDoesTorProvide">What
... ...
@@ -3777,7 +3777,7 @@ Perhaps even run separate Tor clients for these applications.
3777 3777
     <hr>
3778 3778
 
3779 3779
     <a id="AlternateDesigns"></a>
3780
-    <h2><a class="anchor">Alternate designs:</a></h2>
3780
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#AlternateDesigns">Alternate designs:</a></h2>
3781 3781
 
3782 3782
     <a id="EverybodyARelay"></a>
3783 3783
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#EverybodyARelay">You should make every
... ...
@@ -4251,7 +4251,7 @@ only solution is to have no opinion.
4251 4251
     <hr>
4252 4252
 
4253 4253
     <a id="Abuse"></a>
4254
-    <h2><a class="anchor">Abuse:</a></h2>
4254
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Abuse">Abuse:</a></h2>
4255 4255
 
4256 4256
     <a id="Criminals"></a>
4257 4257
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Criminals">Doesn't Tor enable criminals
Browse code

Make section headings within the question list linkable. (#24519)

Add anchors.
Change heading text from paragraphs to h4s, but keep previous vertcal spacing.

kat authored on04/12/2017 21:29:58
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -14,7 +14,8 @@
14 14
     <h1>Tor FAQ</h1>
15 15
     <hr>
16 16
 
17
-    <p>General questions:</p>
17
+    <a id="general"></a>
18
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#general">General questions:</a></h4>
18 19
     <ul>
19 20
     <li><a href="#WhatIsTor">What is Tor?</a></li>
20 21
     <li><a href="#Torisdifferent">How is Tor different from other
... ...
@@ -43,7 +44,8 @@ proxies?</a></li>
43 44
     exit nodes are there?</a></li>
44 45
     </ul>
45 46
 
46
-    <p>Compilation and Installation:</p>
47
+    <a id="comp-install"></a>
48
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#comp-install">Compilation and Installation:</a></h4>
47 49
 
48 50
     <ul>
49 51
     <li><a href="#HowUninstallTor">How do I uninstall Tor?</a></li>
... ...
@@ -58,7 +60,8 @@ proxies?</a></li>
58 60
 includes Tor?</a></li>
59 61
     </ul>
60 62
 
61
-    <p>Tor Browser (general):</p>
63
+    <a id="tbb"></a>
64
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#tbb">Tor Browser (general):</a></h4>
62 65
     <ul>
63 66
 
64 67
     <li><a href="#TBBFlash">Why can't I view videos on YouTube and other
... ...
@@ -90,7 +93,8 @@ unsafe?</a></li>
90 93
     with my application?</a></li>
91 94
     </ul>
92 95
 
93
-    <p>Tor Browser (3.x and later):</p>
96
+    <a id="tbb-3plus"></a>
97
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#tbb-3plus">Tor Browser (3.x and later):</a></h4>
94 98
 
95 99
     <ul>
96 100
     <li><a href="#DisableJS">How do I disable JavaScript?</a></li>
... ...
@@ -105,7 +109,8 @@ unsafe?</a></li>
105 109
     How do I verify a build?</a></li>
106 110
     </ul>
107 111
 
108
-    <p>Advanced Tor usage:</p>
112
+    <a id="advanced"></a>
113
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#advanced">Advanced Tor usage:</a></h4>
109 114
 
110 115
     <ul>
111 116
     <li><a href="#torrc">I'm supposed to "edit my torrc". What does
... ...
@@ -129,7 +134,8 @@ country)
129 134
     SOCKS is leaking DNS requests?</a></li>
130 135
     </ul>
131 136
 
132
-    <p>Running a Tor relay:</p>
137
+    <a id="relay"></a>
138
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#relay">Running a Tor relay:</a></h4>
133 139
     <ul>
134 140
 
135 141
     <li><a href="#HowDoIDecide">How do I decide if I should run a relay?
... ...
@@ -191,14 +197,16 @@ relay.</a></li>
191 197
     run my own?</a></li>
192 198
     </ul>
193 199
 
194
-    <p>Tor onion services:</p>
200
+    <a id="onion-services"></a>
201
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#onion-services">Tor onion services:</a></h4>
195 202
 
196 203
     <ul>
197 204
     <li><a href="#AccessOnionServices">How do I access onion services?</a></li>
198 205
     <li><a href="#ProvideAnOnionService">How do I provide an onion service?</a></li>
199 206
     </ul>
200 207
 
201
-    <p>Development:</p>
208
+    <a id="dev"></a>
209
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#dev">Development:</a></h4>
202 210
 
203 211
     <ul>
204 212
     <li><a href="#VersionNumbers">What do these weird version numbers
... ...
@@ -212,7 +220,8 @@ relay.</a></li>
212 220
     into Tor?</a></li>
213 221
     </ul>
214 222
 
215
-    <p>Anonymity and Security:</p>
223
+    <a id="anonsec"></a>
224
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#anonsec">Anonymity and Security:</a></h4>
216 225
     <ul>
217 226
     <li><a href="#WhatProtectionsDoesTorProvide">What protections does Tor
218 227
     provide?</a></li>
... ...
@@ -240,7 +249,8 @@ uses.</a></li>
240 249
     <li><a href="#LearnMoreAboutAnonymity">Where can I learn more about anonymity?</a></li>
241 250
     </ul>
242 251
 
243
-    <p>Alternate designs that we don't do (yet):</p>
252
+    <a id="altdesigns"></a>
253
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#altdesigns">Alternate designs that we don't do (yet):</a></h4>
244 254
 
245 255
     <ul>
246 256
     <li><a href="#EverybodyARelay">You should make every Tor user be a
... ...
@@ -270,7 +280,8 @@ packets,
270 280
     traffic.</a></li>
271 281
     </ul>
272 282
 
273
-    <p>Abuse:</p>
283
+    <a id="abuse"></a>
284
+    <h4 style="margin-bottom: 18px"><a class="anchor" href="#abuse">Abuse:</a></h4>
274 285
     <ul>
275 286
     <li><a href="#Criminals">Doesn't Tor enable criminals to do bad
276 287
 things?</a></li>
Browse code

Fix for ticket #22609 from pastly

hiromipaw authored on04/12/2017 18:21:07
Showing0 changed files
Browse code

Change hidden -> onion. (See #24285)

Renamed files, made new files with old names for redirects, updated
links to use new URLs.

kat authored on19/11/2017 22:01:11
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -3062,7 +3062,7 @@ diversity,
3062 3062
     onion service?</a></h3>
3063 3063
 
3064 3064
     <p>
3065
-    See the <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">
3065
+    See the <a href="<page docs/tor-onion-service>">
3066 3066
     official onion service configuration instructions</a>.
3067 3067
     </p>
3068 3068
 
Browse code

Change hidden service to onion service. (See #24285)

kat authored on16/11/2017 19:08:34
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -191,11 +191,11 @@ relay.</a></li>
191 191
     run my own?</a></li>
192 192
     </ul>
193 193
 
194
-    <p>Tor hidden services:</p>
194
+    <p>Tor onion services:</p>
195 195
 
196 196
     <ul>
197
-    <li><a href="#AccessHiddenServices">How do I access hidden services?</a></li>
198
-    <li><a href="#ProvideAHiddenService">How do I provide a hidden service?</a></li>
197
+    <li><a href="#AccessOnionServices">How do I access onion services?</a></li>
198
+    <li><a href="#ProvideAnOnionService">How do I provide an onion service?</a></li>
199 199
     </ul>
200 200
 
201 201
     <p>Development:</p>
... ...
@@ -1817,7 +1817,7 @@ versions.
1817 1817
     <p>
1818 1818
     Note also that not every circuit is used to deliver traffic outside of
1819 1819
     the Tor network. It is normal to see non-exit circuits (such as those
1820
-    used to connect to hidden services, those that do directory fetches,
1820
+    used to connect to onion services, those that do directory fetches,
1821 1821
     those used for relay reachability self-tests, and so on) that end at
1822 1822
     a non-exit node. To keep a node from being used entirely, see
1823 1823
     <tt>ExcludeNodes</tt> and <tt>StrictNodes</tt> in the
... ...
@@ -3001,15 +3001,16 @@ diversity,
3001 3001
 
3002 3002
     <hr>
3003 3003
 
3004
-<a id="TorHiddenServices"></a>
3005
-<h2><a class="anchor">Tor hidden services:</a></h2>
3004
+# Leaving in old ids to accomodate incoming links.
3005
+<a id="TorOnionServices"></a><a id="TorHiddenServices"></a>
3006
+<h2><a class="anchor">Tor onion services:</a></h2>
3006 3007
 
3007
-    <a id="AccessHiddenServices"></a>
3008
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AccessHiddenServices">How do I access
3009
-    hidden services?</a></h3>
3008
+    <a id="AccessOnionServices"></a><a id="AccessHiddenServices"></a>
3009
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#AccessOnionServices">How do I access
3010
+    onion services?</a></h3>
3010 3011
 
3011 3012
     <p>
3012
-    Tor hidden services are named with a special top-level domain (TLD)
3013
+    Tor onion services are named with a special top-level domain (TLD)
3013 3014
     name in DNS: .onion. Since the .onion TLD is not recognized by the
3014 3015
     official root DNS servers on the Internet, your application will not
3015 3016
     get the response it needs to locate the service. Currently, the Tor
... ...
@@ -3020,7 +3021,7 @@ diversity,
3020 3021
 <p>
3021 3022
  Therefore, your application <b>needs</b> to pass the .onion hostname to
3022 3023
  Tor directly. You can't try to resolve it to an IP address, since there
3023
- <i>is</i> no corresponding IP address: the server is hidden, after all!
3024
+ <i>is</i> no corresponding IP address.
3024 3025
 </p>
3025 3026
 
3026 3027
     <p>
... ...
@@ -3044,10 +3045,10 @@ diversity,
3044 3045
     <p>
3045 3046
     For applications that do not support HTTP proxy, and so cannot use
3046 3047
     Polipo, <a href="http://www.freecap.ru/eng/">FreeCap</a> is an
3047
-    alternative. When using FreeCap set proxy protocol  to SOCKS 5 and under
3048
+    alternative. When using FreeCap set proxy protocol to SOCKS 5 and under
3048 3049
     settings set DNS name resolving to remote. This
3049 3050
     will allow you to use almost any program with Tor without leaking DNS
3050
-    lookups and allow those same programs to access hidden services.
3051
+    lookups and allow those same programs to access onion services.
3051 3052
     </p>
3052 3053
 
3053 3054
     <p>
... ...
@@ -3056,13 +3057,13 @@ diversity,
3056 3057
 
3057 3058
     <hr>
3058 3059
 
3059
-    <a id="ProvideAHiddenService"></a>
3060
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ProvideAHiddenService">How do I provide a
3061
-    hidden service?</a></h3>
3060
+    <a id="ProvideAnOnionService"></a><a id="ProvideAHiddenService"></a>
3061
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#ProvideAnOnionService">How do I provide an
3062
+    onion service?</a></h3>
3062 3063
 
3063 3064
     <p>
3064 3065
     See the <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">
3065
-    official hidden service configuration instructions</a>.
3066
+    official onion service configuration instructions</a>.
3066 3067
     </p>
3067 3068
 
3068 3069
     <hr>
... ...
@@ -3951,7 +3952,7 @@ and clients need to predict all the packets they will want to send in
3951 3952
 a session before picking their exit node!
3952 3953
 </li>
3953 3954
 <li>The Tor-internal name spaces would need to be redesigned. We support
3954
-hidden service ".onion" addresses by intercepting the addresses when
3955
+onion service ".onion" addresses by intercepting the addresses when
3955 3956
 they are passed to the Tor client. Doing so at the IP level will require
3956 3957
 a more complex interface between Tor and the local DNS resolver.
3957 3958
 </li>
... ...
@@ -4002,7 +4003,7 @@ their path length.</a></h3>
4002 4003
 <p>
4003 4004
  Right now the path length is hard-coded at 3 plus the number of nodes in
4004 4005
  your path that are sensitive. That is, in normal cases it's 3, but for
4005
- example if you're accessing a hidden service or a ".exit" address it could be 4.
4006
+ example if you're accessing an onion service or a ".exit" address it could be 4.
4006 4007
 </p>
4007 4008
 <p>
4008 4009
  We don't want to encourage people to use paths longer than this &mdash; it
Browse code

typo serveral->several

Matt Traudt authored on15/06/2017 15:04:22
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -682,7 +682,7 @@ with more funding?</a></h3>
682 682
 
683 683
     <p>
684 684
     The Tor network's <a
685
-href="https://metrics.torproject.org/networksize.html">serveral thousand</a>
685
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/networksize.html">several thousand</a>
686 686
     relays push <a
687 687
 href="https://metrics.torproject.org/bandwidth.html">around 100 Gbps on
688 688
 average</a>. We have <a
Browse code

Fix 3 links about current Tor network usage/size

Matt Traudt authored on14/06/2017 04:25:04
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -682,15 +682,12 @@ with more funding?</a></h3>
682 682
 
683 683
     <p>
684 684
     The Tor network's <a
685
-
686
-href="https://metrics.torproject.org/network.html#networksize">several
687
-    thousand</a> relays push <a
688
-    href="https://metrics.torproject.org/network.html#bandwidth">over
689
-    7.5GB per second on average</a>. We have <a
690
-
691
-href="https://metrics.torproject.org/users.html#direct-users">millions of
692
-    daily users</a>. But the Tor network is not yet
693
-    self-sustaining.
685
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/networksize.html">serveral thousand</a>
686
+    relays push <a
687
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/bandwidth.html">around 100 Gbps on
688
+average</a>. We have <a
689
+href="https://metrics.torproject.org/userstats-relay-country.html">millions of
690
+    daily users</a>. But the Tor network is not yet self-sustaining.
694 691
     </p>
695 692
 
696 693
     <p>
Browse code

fix answer about torrc location on tor browser for macOS

fix comes mostly from pastly (thanks!)

Roger Dingledine authored on10/05/2017 23:05:51
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -1525,15 +1525,19 @@ instructions for how your Tor program should behave. The default
1525 1525
 configuration should work fine for most Tor users.
1526 1526
 </p>
1527 1527
 <p>
1528
-If you installed Tor Browser, look for
1528
+If you installed Tor Browser on Windows or Linux, look for
1529 1529
 <code>Browser/TorBrowser/Data/Tor/torrc</code> inside your Tor Browser
1530 1530
 directory.
1531
-On OS X, you must right-click or command-click on the Tor Browser icon,
1532
-and select "Show Package Contents" before the Tor Browser directories become
1533
-visible.
1531
+If you're on macOS, the torrc is in <code>~/Library/Application Support/TorBrowser-Data/Tor</code> .
1532
+To get to it, press cmd-shift-g while in Finder and copy/paste that directory
1533
+into the box that appears.
1534 1534
 </p>
1535 1535
 <p>
1536
-Tor looks for the torrc file in <code>/usr/local/etc/tor/torrc</code> if you compiled tor from source, and <code>/etc/tor/torrc</code> or <code>/etc/torrc</code> if you installed a pre-built package.</p>
1536
+Otherwise, if you are using Tor without Tor Browser, it looks for the
1537
+torrc file in <code>/usr/local/etc/tor/torrc</code> if you compiled tor
1538
+from source, and <code>/etc/tor/torrc</code> or <code>/etc/torrc</code>
1539
+if you installed a pre-built package.
1540
+</p>
1537 1541
 
1538 1542
 <p>
1539 1543
 Once you've created or changed your torrc file, you will need to restart
Browse code

Remove note about already fixed #8641

Ivan Markin authored on29/11/2016 22:51:04 • Sebastian Hahn committed on12/12/2016 12:31:54
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -1389,10 +1389,7 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1389 1389
     (Vidalia) go?</a></h3>
1390 1390
 
1391 1391
     <p>Vidalia has been replaced with Tor Launcher, which is a Firefox
1392
-    extension that provides similar functionality. Unfortunately, circuit
1393
-    status reporting is still missing, but we are <a
1394
-    href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/ticket/8641">working
1395
-    on providing it</a>. </p>
1392
+    extension that provides similar functionality.</p>
1396 1393
 
1397 1394
     <hr>
1398 1395
 
Browse code

Update BandwidthRate minimum in FAQ.

Nick Mathewson authored on09/11/2016 01:25:02
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2192,7 +2192,7 @@ too.
2192 2192
     second). For example, you might want to choose "BandwidthRate 10 MBytes"
2193 2193
     for 10 megabytes per second (a fast connection), or "BandwidthRate 500
2194 2194
     KBytes" for 500 kilobytes per second (a decent cable connection).
2195
-    The minimum BandwidthRate setting is 20 kilobytes per second.
2195
+    The minimum BandwidthRate setting is 75 kilobytes per second.
2196 2196
     </li>
2197 2197
     <li>
2198 2198
     BandwidthBurst is a pool of bytes used to fulfill requests during
Browse code

Bug 20465: Call it 'Tor Browser', not 'The Tor Browser'

Arthur Edelstein authored on25/10/2016 22:33:02
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -873,8 +873,8 @@ executive
873 873
 
874 874
     <p>No, it doesn't. You need to use a separate program that understands
875 875
     your application and protocol and knows how to clean or "scrub" the data
876
-    it sends. The Tor Browser tries to keep application-level data,
877
-    like the user-agent string, uniform for all users. The Tor Browser can't
876
+    it sends. Tor Browser tries to keep application-level data,
877
+    like the user-agent string, uniform for all users. Tor Browser can't
878 878
     do anything about text that you type into forms, though. <a
879 879
     href="<page download/download-easy>#warning">Be
880 880
     careful and be smart.</a>
... ...
@@ -1060,7 +1060,7 @@ from the graphical interface. Open "Files" (Unity's explorer), open
1060 1060
 Preferences-> Behavior Tab -> Set "Run executable text files when they are
1061 1061
 opened" to "Ask every time", then OK.
1062 1062
 </p>
1063
-<p>You can also start the Tor Browser from the command line by running </p>
1063
+<p>You can also start Tor Browser from the command line by running </p>
1064 1064
 <pre>./start-tor-browser</pre>
1065 1065
 <p>
1066 1066
 from inside the Tor Browser directory.
... ...
@@ -1104,7 +1104,7 @@ issue.
1104 1104
 Firefox extensions?</a></h3>
1105 1105
 
1106 1106
 <p>
1107
-The Tor Browser is free software, so there is nothing preventing you from
1107
+Tor Browser is free software, so there is nothing preventing you from
1108 1108
 modifying it any way you like. However, we do not recommend installing any
1109 1109
 additional Firefox add-ons with Tor Browser. Add-ons can break
1110 1110
 your anonymity in a number of ways, including browser fingerprinting and
... ...
@@ -1112,7 +1112,7 @@ bypassing proxy settings.
1112 1112
 </p>
1113 1113
 <p>
1114 1114
 Some people have suggested we include ad-blocking software or
1115
-anti-tracking software with the Tor Browser. Right now, we do not
1115
+anti-tracking software with Tor Browser. Right now, we do not
1116 1116
 think that's such a good idea. Tor Browser aims to provide
1117 1117
 sufficient privacy that additional add-ons to stop ads and trackers are
1118 1118
 not necessary. Using add-ons like these may cause some sites to break, which
... ...
@@ -1185,7 +1185,7 @@ really bad idea.
1185 1185
 Our efforts to work with the Chrome team to <a
1186 1186
 href="https://blog.torproject.org/blog/google-chrome-incognito-mode-tor-and-fingerprinting">add
1187 1187
 missing APIs</a> were unsuccessful, unfortunately. Currently, it is impossible
1188
-to use other browsers and get the same level of protections as when using the
1188
+to use other browsers and get the same level of protections as when using
1189 1189
 Tor Browser.
1190 1190
 </p>
1191 1191
 
... ...
@@ -3375,9 +3375,9 @@ diversity,
3375 3375
     a web browser that is preconfigured to
3376 3376
     help you control the risks to your privacy and anonymity while browsing
3377 3377
     the Internet. Not only are the above technologies disabled to prevent
3378
-    identity leaks, the Tor Browser also includes browser extensions like
3378
+    identity leaks, Tor Browser also includes browser extensions like
3379 3379
     NoScript and Torbutton, as well as patches to the Firefox source
3380
-    code. The full design of the Tor Browser can be read <a
3380
+    code. The full design of Tor Browser can be read <a
3381 3381
     href="https://www.torproject.org/projects/torbrowser/design/">here</a>.
3382 3382
     In designing a safe, secure solution for browsing the web with Tor,
3383 3383
     we've discovered that configuring <a href="#TBBOtherBrowser">other
Browse code

Two more blog url fixes

Sebastian Hahn authored on23/09/2016 06:24:06
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2366,7 +2366,7 @@ on
2366 2366
     <a href="<page docs/faq-abuse>#TypicalAbuses">issues you might
2367 2367
 encounter</a>
2368 2368
     if you use the default exit policy, and then read Mike Perry's
2369
-    <a href="<blog>running-exit-node">tips
2369
+    <a href="<blog>tips-running-exit-node">tips
2370 2370
     for running an exit node with minimal harassment</a>.
2371 2371
     </p>
2372 2372
 
Browse code

tor doesn't "install" or "put" the torrc file

humans (or packages) do.

Roger Dingledine authored on24/08/2016 07:09:27
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -1523,7 +1523,7 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1523 1523
 What does that mean?</a></h3>
1524 1524
 
1525 1525
 <p>
1526
-Tor installs a text file called torrc that contains configuration
1526
+Tor uses a text file called torrc that contains configuration
1527 1527
 instructions for how your Tor program should behave. The default
1528 1528
 configuration should work fine for most Tor users.
1529 1529
 </p>
... ...
@@ -1536,11 +1536,11 @@ and select "Show Package Contents" before the Tor Browser directories become
1536 1536
 visible.
1537 1537
 </p>
1538 1538
 <p>
1539
-Tor puts the torrc file in <code>/usr/local/etc/tor/torrc</code> if you compiled tor from source, and <code>/etc/tor/torrc</code> or <code>/etc/torrc</code> if you installed a pre-built package.</p>
1539
+Tor looks for the torrc file in <code>/usr/local/etc/tor/torrc</code> if you compiled tor from source, and <code>/etc/tor/torrc</code> or <code>/etc/torrc</code> if you installed a pre-built package.</p>
1540 1540
 
1541 1541
 <p>
1542
-Once you've changed your torrc, you will need to restart tor for the
1543
-changes to take effect. (For advanced users, note that
1542
+Once you've created or changed your torrc file, you will need to restart
1543
+tor for the changes to take effect. (For advanced users, note that
1544 1544
 you actually only need to send Tor a HUP signal, not actually restart
1545 1545
 it.)
1546 1546
 </p>
Browse code

more link fixing

Sebastian Hahn authored on14/07/2016 21:45:02
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -1482,14 +1482,6 @@ href="http://www.crowdstrike.com/community-tools/index.html#tool-79">proposed
1482 1482
     Exitpolicy reject *:*
1483 1483
     BridgeRelay 1  # only add this line if you want to be a bridge
1484 1484
     </pre>
1485
-    <p>
1486
-    If you've installed <a
1487
-    href="<page projects/obfsproxy-debian-instructions>#instructions">Obfsproxy</a>,
1488
-    you'll need to add one more line:
1489
-    </p>
1490
-    <pre>
1491
-    ServerTransportPlugin obfs3 exec /usr/bin/obfsproxy managed
1492
-    </pre>
1493 1485
 
1494 1486
     <hr>
1495 1487
 
... ...
@@ -2581,7 +2573,7 @@ short)
2581 2573
     <p>
2582 2574
     Several countries, including China and Iran, have found ways to
2583 2575
     detect and block connections to Tor bridges.
2584
-    <a href="<page projects/obfsproxy>">Obfsproxy</a> bridges address
2576
+    <a href="<page docs/pluggable-transports>">Obfsproxy</a> bridges address
2585 2577
     this by adding another layer of obfuscation.
2586 2578
     </p>
2587 2579
 
Browse code

Remove references to exit enclaving

This never worked reliably, with microdescriptors we don't even attempt
it anymore.

Sebastian Hahn authored on24/04/2016 12:48:31
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -3343,24 +3343,6 @@ diversity,
3343 3343
     has already gone wrong and you shouldn't be thinking that Tor is the problem.)
3344 3344
     </p>
3345 3345
 
3346
-    <p>
3347
-    Tor does provide a partial solution in a very specific situation, though.
3348
-    When you make a connection to a destination that also runs a Tor relay,
3349
-    Tor will automatically extend your circuit so you exit from that circuit.
3350
-    So for example if Indymedia ran a Tor relay on the same IP address as
3351
-    their website, people using Tor to get to the Indymedia website would
3352
-    automatically exit from their Tor relay, thus getting *better* encryption
3353
-    and authentication properties than just browsing there the normal way.
3354
-    </p>
3355
-
3356
-    <p>
3357
-    We'd like to make it still work even if the service is nearby the Tor
3358
-    relay but not on the same IP address. But there are a variety of
3359
-    technical problems we need to overcome first (the main one being "how
3360
-    does the Tor client learn which relays are associated with which
3361
-    websites in a decentralized yet non-gamable way?").
3362
-    </p>
3363
-
3364 3346
     <hr>
3365 3347
 
3366 3348
     <a id="AmITotallyAnonymous"></a>
Browse code

Remove certificates section from Tor faq

inspired by #18880

Sebastian Hahn authored on24/04/2016 12:36:58
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -41,8 +41,6 @@ proxies?</a></li>
41 41
     from the data my application sends?</a></li>
42 42
     <li><a href="#Metrics">How many people use Tor? How many relays or
43 43
     exit nodes are there?</a></li>
44
-    <li><a href="#SSLcertfingerprint">What are your SSL certificate
45
-    fingerprints?</a></li>
46 44
     </ul>
47 45
 
48 46
     <p>Compilation and Installation:</p>
... ...
@@ -893,38 +891,6 @@ executive
893 891
     href="https://metrics.torproject.org/">Tor Metrics Portal</a>.</p>
894 892
     <hr>
895 893
 
896
-    <a id="SSLcertfingerprint"></a>
897
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#SSLcertfingerprint">What are the SSL
898
-    certificate fingerprints for Tor's various websites?</a></h3>
899
-    <p>
900
-    *.torproject.org SSL certificate from Digicert:
901
-    </p>
902
-    <pre>
903
-Issued Certificate
904
-Version: 3
905
-Serial Number: 09 48 B1 A9 3B 25 1D 0D B1 05 10 59 E2 C2 68 0A
906
-Not Valid Before: 2013-10-22
907
-Not Valid After: 2016-05-03
908
-Certificate Fingerprints
909
-SHA1: 84 24 56 56 8E D7 90 43 47 AA 89 AB 77 7D A4 94 3B A1 A7 D5
910
-MD5: A4 16 66 80 AE B9 A4 EC AA 88 01 1B 6F B9 EB CB
911
-    </pre>
912
-<br>
913
-    <p>
914
-blog.torproject.org SSL certificate from RapidSSL:
915
-    </p>
916
-    <pre>
917
-Issued Certificate
918
-Version: 3
919
-Serial Number: 05 CA 2A A9 A5 D6 ED 44 C7 2D 88 1A 18 B0 E7 DC
920
-Not Valid Before: 2014-04-09
921
-Not Valid After: 2017-06-14
922
-Certificate Fingerprints
923
-SHA1: DE 20 3D 46 FD C3 68 EB BA 40 56 39 F5 FA FD F5 4E 3A 1F 83
924
-MD5: 8A 8A A2 5E D9 7F 84 4C 8F 00 3B 43 E0 2D E6 4D
925
-    </pre>
926
-    <hr>
927
-
928 894
     <a id="CompilationAndInstallation"></a>
929 895
     <h2><a class="anchor">Compilation And Installation:</a></h2>
930 896
 
Browse code

update blog post url

Roger Dingledine authored on04/04/2016 12:14:57
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -2408,7 +2408,7 @@ on
2408 2408
     <a href="<page docs/faq-abuse>#TypicalAbuses">issues you might
2409 2409
 encounter</a>
2410 2410
     if you use the default exit policy, and then read Mike Perry's
2411
-    <a href="<blog>tips-running-exit-node-minimal-harassment">tips
2411
+    <a href="<blog>running-exit-node">tips
2412 2412
     for running an exit node with minimal harassment</a>.
2413 2413
     </p>
2414 2414
 
Browse code

Offend everyone thoroughly

- remove one FAQ entry
- consistently say Linux, not GNU/Linux
- remove references of FreeBSD in TB context

Sebastian Hahn authored on30/03/2016 09:32:11
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -155,8 +155,6 @@ be?</a></li>
155 155
     limiting bandwidth on my Tor relay?</a></li>
156 156
     <li><a href="#ExitPolicies">I'd run a relay, but I don't want to deal
157 157
     with abuse issues.</a></li>
158
-    <li><a href="#BestOSForRelay">Why doesn't my Windows (or other OS) Tor
159
-    relay run well?</a></li>
160 158
     <li><a href="#PackagedTor">Should I install Tor from my package manager,
161 159
     or build from source?</a></li>
162 160
     <li><a href="#WhatIsTheBadExitFlag">What is the BadExit flag?</a></li>
... ...
@@ -1799,7 +1797,7 @@ for details.
1799 1797
 <li>
1800 1798
 If it's still vanishing mysteriously, perhaps something else is killing it?
1801 1799
 Do you have resource limits (ulimits) configured that kill off processes
1802
-sometimes? (This is especially common on OpenBSD.) On Linux, try running
1800
+sometimes? On Linux, try running
1803 1801
 "dmesg" to see if the out-of-memory killer removed your process. (Tor will
1804 1802
 exit cleanly if it notices that it's run out of memory, but in some cases
1805 1803
 it might not have time to notice.) In very rare circumstances, hardware
... ...
@@ -2446,50 +2444,6 @@ users
2446 2444
 
2447 2445
     <hr>
2448 2446
 
2449
-    <a id="BestOSForRelay"></a>
2450
-    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#BestOSForRelay">Why doesn't my Windows (or other OS) Tor relay run well?</h3></a>
2451
-
2452
-    <p>
2453
-    Tor relays work best on Linux, FreeBSD 5.x+, OS X Tiger or
2454
-    later, and Windows Server 2003 or later.
2455
-    </p>
2456
-
2457
-    <p>You can probably get it working just fine on other operating
2458
-    systems too, but note the following caveats:
2459
-    </p>
2460
-
2461
-    <ul>
2462
-    <li>
2463
-    Versions of Windows without the word "server" in their name
2464
-    sometimes have problems. This is especially the case for Win98,
2465
-    but it also happens in some cases for XP, especially if you don't
2466
-    have much memory. The problem is that we don't use the networking
2467
-    system calls in a very Windows-like way, so we run out of space in
2468
-    a fixed-size memory space known as the non-page pool, and then
2469
-    everything goes bad. The symptom is an assert error with the
2470
-    message "No buffer space available [WSAENOBUFS ] [10055]".  <a
2471
-    href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/doc/WindowsBufferProblems">You
2472
-    can read more here.</a>
2473
-    </li>
2474
-
2475
-    <li>
2476
-    Most developers who contribute to Tor work with Unix-like operating
2477
-    systems. It would be great if more people with Windows experience help
2478
-    out, so we can improve Tor's usability and stability in
2479
-    Windows.
2480
-    </li>
2481
-
2482
-    <li>
2483
-    More esoteric or archaic operating systems, like SunOS 5.9 or
2484
-    Irix64, may have problems with some libevent methods (devpoll,
2485
-    etc), probably due to bugs in libevent. If you experience crashes,
2486
-    try setting the EVENT_NODEVPOLL or equivalent environment
2487
-    variable.
2488
-    </li>
2489
-    </ul>
2490
-
2491
-    <hr>
2492
-
2493 2447
     <a id="PackagedTor"></a>
2494 2448
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#PackagedTor">Should I install Tor from my
2495 2449
     package manager, or build from source?</a></h3>
... ...
@@ -2975,14 +2929,6 @@ connections
2975 2929
 use
2976 2930
     this feature.</li>
2977 2931
 
2978
-<!-- Nickm says he's not sure this is still accurate
2979
-
2980
-    <li>If you're running on Solaris, OpenBSD, NetBSD, or
2981
-    old FreeBSD, Tor is probably forking separate processes
2982
-    rather than using threads. Consider switching to a <a
2983
-    href="<wikifaq>#WhydoesntmyWindowsorotherOSTorrelayrunwell">better
2984
-    operating system</a>.</li>
2985 2932
     <li>If you still can't handle the memory load, consider reducing the
2986 2933
     amount of bandwidth your relay advertises. Advertising less
2987 2934
 bandwidth
Browse code

Clarify that Tor helps with local adversaries (#13342)

Sebastian Hahn authored on30/03/2016 00:45:59
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -3389,8 +3389,9 @@ diversity,
3389 3389
 
3390 3390
     <p>
3391 3391
     Second, Tor prevents people watching your traffic locally (such as
3392
-    your ISP) from learning what information you're fetching and where
3393
-    you're fetching it from. It also stops them from deciding what you're
3392
+    your ISP or someone with access to your home wifi or router) from
3393
+    learning what information you're fetching and where you're fetching
3394
+    it from. It also stops them from deciding what you're
3394 3395
     allowed to learn and publish -- if you can get to any part of the Tor
3395 3396
     network, you can reach any site on the Internet.
3396 3397
     </p>
Browse code

point to "no backdoor" video

make the support question point to the contact page

Roger Dingledine authored on11/03/2016 22:33:42
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -404,16 +404,17 @@ Tor and HTTPS</a> to understand how Tor and HTTPS interact.
404 404
 can I use with Tor?</a></h3>
405 405
 
406 406
     <p>
407
-    If you want to use Tor with a web browser, we provide the Tor Browser,
407
+    Most people use Tor Browser,
408 408
     which includes everything you need to browse the web safely using
409
-    Tor. If you want to use another web browser with Tor, see <a
410
-    href="#TBBOtherBrowser">Other web browsers</a>.
409
+    Tor. Using other browsers is <a href="#TBBOtherBrowser">dangerous
410
+    and not recommended</a>.
411 411
     </p>
412 412
     <p>
413 413
     There are plenty of other programs you can use with Tor,
414 414
     but we haven't researched the application-level anonymity
415 415
     issues on all of them well enough to be able to recommend a safe
416
-    configuration. Our wiki has a list of instructions for <a
416
+    configuration. Our wiki has a community-maintained list of
417
+    instructions for <a
417 418
     href="<wiki>doc/TorifyHOWTO">Torifying
418 419
     specific applications</a>.
419 420
     Please add to these lists and help us keep them accurate!
... ...
@@ -464,6 +465,9 @@ Tor?</a></h3>
464 465
     </p>
465 466
 
466 467
     <p>
468
+    We will <a
469
+    href="https://media.ccc.de/v/31c3_-_6251_-_en_-_saal_1_-_201412301400_-_state_of_the_onion_-_jacob_-_arma">never</a>
470
+    put a backdoor in Tor.
467 471
     We think that putting a backdoor in Tor would be tremendously
468 472
     irresponsible to our users, and a bad precedent for security
469 473
     software in general. If we ever put a deliberate backdoor in our
... ...
@@ -534,43 +538,14 @@ Tor?</a></h3>
534 538
     our <a href="<page docs/trademark-faq>">trademark FAQ</a> for details.
535 539
     </p>
536 540
 
537
-    <p>
538
-    Lastly, you should realize that we release new versions of the
539
-    Tor software frequently, and sometimes we make backward incompatible
540
-    changes. So if you distribute a particular version of the Tor software, it
541
-    may not be supported &mdash; or even work &mdash; six months later. This
542
-    is a fact of life for all security software under heavy development.
543
-    </p>
544
-
545 541
     <hr>
546 542
 
547 543
     <a id="SupportMail"></a>
548 544
     <h3><a class="anchor" href="#SupportMail">How can I get
549 545
 support?</a></h3>
550 546
 
551
-    <p>Your best bet is to first try the following:</p>
552
-    <ol>
553
-    <li>Read through this <a href="<page docs/faq>">FAQ</a>.</li>
554
-    <li>Read through the <a href="<page
555
-docs/documentation>">documentation</a>.</li>
556
-    <li>Read through the <a
557
-
558
-href="https://lists.torproject.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/tor-talk">
559
-tor-talk
560
-    archives</a> and see if your question is already answered.</li>
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-    <li>Join our <a href="ircs://irc.torproject.org#tor">irc channel</a>
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-and
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-    state the issue and wait for help.</li>
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-    <li>Send an email to <a
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-
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-href="mailto:help@rt.torproject.org">help@rt.torproject.org</a>.</li>
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-    <li>If all else fails, try <a href="<page about/contact>">contacting
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-us</a> directly.</li>
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-    </ol>
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-
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-    <p>If you find your answer, please stick around on the IRC channel
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-or the
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-    mailing list to help others who were once in your position.</p>
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+    <p>See the <a href="<page about/contact>#support">Support section
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+    on the contact page</a>.
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     <hr>
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Browse code

clean up the 'how is tor different' section

Roger Dingledine authored on11/03/2016 22:05:54
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -301,25 +301,22 @@ things?</a></li>
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     </p>
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     <p>
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-    The Tor software is a program you can run on your computer that
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-helps keep
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-    you safe on the Internet. Tor protects you by bouncing your
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-communications
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+    Tor is a program you can run on your computer that helps keep
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+    you safe on the Internet. It protects you by bouncing your communications
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     around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around
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-    the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection
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-from
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+    the world: it prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from
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     learning what sites you visit, and it prevents the sites you visit
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-    from learning your physical location. This set of volunteer relays
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-is
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-    called the Tor network. You can read more about how Tor works on the
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-<a
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-    href="<page about/overview>">overview page</a>.
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+    from learning your physical location.
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+    This set of volunteer relays is called the <b>Tor network</b>.
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+    The way most people use Tor is with <b>Tor Browser</b>,
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+    which is a version of Firefox that fixes many privacy issues.
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+    You can read more about how Tor works on the <a href="<page
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+    about/overview>">overview page</a>.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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-    The Tor Project is a non-profit (charity) organization that
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-maintains
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-    and develops the Tor software.
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+    The <b>Tor Project</b> is a non-profit (charity) organization that
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+    maintains and develops the Tor software.
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     </p>
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     <hr>
... ...
@@ -342,47 +339,38 @@ install anything.  You just have to point your browser at their proxy
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 server.
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 Simple proxy providers are fine solutions if you do not want protections
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 for
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-your privacy and anonymity online and you trust the provider from doing
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+your privacy and anonymity online and you trust the provider to not do
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 bad
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 things.  Some simple proxy providers use SSL to secure your connection
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-to them.
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-This may protect you against local eavesdroppers, such as those at a
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-cafe with
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-free wifi Internet.
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+to them, which protects you against local eavesdroppers, such as those at a
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+cafe with free wifi Internet.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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     Simple proxy providers also create a single point of failure.  The
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 provider
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-knows who you are and where you browse on the Internet.  They can see
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+knows both who you are and what you browse on the Internet.  They can see
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 your
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 traffic as it passes through their server.  In some cases, they can even
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 see
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 inside your
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 encrypted traffic as they relay it to your banking site or to ecommerce
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 stores.
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-You have to trust the provider isn't doing any number of things, such as
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+You have to trust the provider isn't
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 watching your traffic, injecting their own advertisements into your
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 traffic
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-stream, and recording your personal details.
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+stream, or recording your personal details.
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     </p>
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     <p>
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     Tor passes your traffic through at least 3 different servers before
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 sending
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 it on to the destination. Because there's a separate layer of encryption
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 for
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-each of the three relays, Tor does not modify, or even know, what you
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-are
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-sending into it.  It merely relays your traffic, completely encrypted
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-through
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-the Tor network and has it pop out somewhere else in the world,
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-completely
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-intact.  The Tor client is required because we assume you trust your
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-local
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-computer.  The Tor client manages the encryption and the path chosen
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-through
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-the network.  The relays located all over the world merely pass
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-encrypted
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-packets between themselves.</p>
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+each of the three relays, somebody watching your Internet connection
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+can't modify, or read, what you are
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+sending into the Tor network. Your traffic is encrypted between the Tor
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+client (on your computer) and where it pops out somewhere else in the
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+world.
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+</p>
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     <p>
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     <dl>
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     <dt>Doesn't the first server see who I am?</dt><dd>Possibly. A bad
... ...
@@ -395,18 +383,16 @@ merely sees
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 world, so
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 using Tor by itself is fine.  You are still protected from this node
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 figuring
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-out who you are and where you are going on the Internet.</dd>
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+out both who you are and where you are going on the Internet.</dd>
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     <dt>Can't the third server see my traffic?</dt><dd>Possibly.  A bad
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 third
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 of three servers can see the traffic you sent into Tor.  It won't know
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 who sent
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-this traffic.  If you're using encryption, such as visiting a bank or
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-e-commerce website, or encrypted mail connections, etc, it will only
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-know the
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-destination.  It won't be able to see the data inside the traffic
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-stream.  You
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-are still protected from this node figuring out who you are and if using
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-encryption, what data you're sending to the destination.</dd>
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+this traffic.  If you're using encryption (like
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+HTTPS), it will only know the destination. See <a
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+href="https://www.eff.org/pages/tor-and-https">this visualization of
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+Tor and HTTPS</a> to understand how Tor and HTTPS interact.
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+</dd>
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     </dl>
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     </p>
412 398
 
Browse code

get rid of the table of contents for the table of contents

Roger Dingledine authored on11/03/2016 20:37:01
Showing1 changed files
... ...
@@ -14,20 +14,6 @@
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     <h1>Tor FAQ</h1>
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     <hr>
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-    <p><a href="#General">General questions:</a><br />
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-    <a href="#CompilationAndInstallation">Compilation and Installation:</a><br />
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-    <a href="#TBBGeneral">Tor Browser (general):</a><br />
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-    <a href="#TBB3.x">Tor Browser (3.x and later):</a><br />
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-    <a href="#AdvancedTorUsage">Advanced Tor usage:</a><br />
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