Browse code

first cut of the new, shiny tor website as wml.

Andrew Lewman authored on09/07/2010 03:55:22
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+# Directions for building the website:
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+#
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+# FIXME: this is incorrect, because maint-0.2.1 and master merged
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+# 1. Clone the Tor git repository, switch to branch maint-0.2.1, and
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+# make TORSVNSTABLE point to it: 
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+#
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+# 	git clone git://git.torproject.org/tor/ tor-stable
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+# 	cd tor-stable && git checkout maint-0.2.1
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+#
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+# 2. Clone the Tor git repository again and make TORGIT point to it:
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+#
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+# 	git clone git://git.torproject.org/tor/ tor
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+#
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+# 3. Edit include/versions.wmi or others if you like
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+# 4. Update STABLETAG and DEVTAG below if there is a new git tag
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+# 5. make
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+# 6. ./publish
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+
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+# FIXME: these are the same
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+#TORSVNSTABLE = tor/stable
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+TORSVNSTABLE = tor-stable
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+TORGIT = tor/.git
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+STABLETAG = tor-0.2.1.26
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+DEVTAG = tor-0.2.2.13-alpha
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+
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+WMLBASE = .
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+SUBDIRS =docs eff projects press about download download getinvolved donate
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+
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+include $(WMLBASE)/Makefile.common
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+all: $(SUBDIRS)
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+
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+docs:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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+eff:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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+projects:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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+press:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..
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+about:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=.. 
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+download:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=.. 
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+getinvolved:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=.. 
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+donate:
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+	$(MAKE) -C "$@" WMLBASE=..  
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+mirrors:
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+	./update-mirrors.pl
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+translations:
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+	./po2wml.sh
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+qrcode:
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+	qrencode -o img/android/orbot-qr-code-latest.png \
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+    "http://www.torproject.org/dist/android/alpha-orbot-latest.apk"
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+
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+# XXX: this also depends on all subs' wmlfiles.  How to fix?
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+translation-status.html.en: $(LANGS) $(WMIFILES) $(WMLFILES)
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+
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+.PHONY: docs eff projects press about download download getinvolved donate
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+# Directions for adding a new language:
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+# 1. Add the two-letter code to LANGS below.
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+# 2. Add a new "%.html.es: es/%.wml en/%.wml" clause below.
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+# 3. Add a new ".deps/%.html.es.d: es/%.wml .deps/.stamp" clause below.
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+# 4. mkdir a new two-letter directory. Make sure there's a foot.wmi
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+#    and navigation.wmi.
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+# 5. Edit include/perl-globals.wmi, add to @LANGUAGES and %LANGUAGES.
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+#    You might find useful %LANGUAGES strings at the bottom of
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+#    http://debian.org/
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+# 6. Add a new images/es.png flag image.
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+
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+WMLOPT  = \
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+          -I $(WMLBASE)/include \
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+          -D DOCROOT=$(WMLBASE) \
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+          -D IMGROOT=$(WMLBASE)/images \
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+          -D TORSVNSTABLE=$(TORSVNSTABLE) \
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+          -D TORGIT=$(TORGIT)\
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+          -D DEVTAG=$(DEVTAG) \
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+          -D STABLETAG=$(STABLETAG)
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+
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+LANGS=ar bms de en es et fa it fi fr ja ko nl no pl pt ru se tr zh-cn
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+#LANGS=en
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+
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+WMLFILES=$(wildcard $(patsubst %, %/*.wml, $(LANGS)))
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+WMIFILES=$(wildcard $(patsubst %, %/*.wmi, $(LANGS)) $(WMLBASE)/include/*.wmi )
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+
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+HTMLFILES = $(shell perl -le 's,  (.*)/(.*).wml  ,        $$2.html.$$1    ,x, print $$_ for @ARGV' $(WMLFILES))
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+DEPFILES  = $(shell perl -le 's,  (.*)/(.*).wml  ,  .deps/$$2.html.$$1.d  ,x, print $$_ for @ARGV' $(WMLFILES))
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+
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+
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+all: $(HTMLFILES)
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+
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+%.html.en: en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.ar: ar/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.bms: bms/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.es: es/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.et: et/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.de: de/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.fa: fa/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.it: it/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.fi: fi/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.fr: fr/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.ja: ja/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.ko: ko/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.nl: nl/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.no: no/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.pl: pl/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.pt: pt/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.ru: ru/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.se: se/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.tr: tr/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+%.html.zh-cn: zh-cn/%.wml en/%.wml
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $@
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+
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+.deps/%.html.en.d: en/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.ar.d: es/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.bms.d: bms/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.es.d: es/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.et.d: et/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.de.d: de/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.it.d: it/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.fa.d: fa/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.fi.d: fi/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.fr.d: fr/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.ja.d: ja/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.ko.d: ko/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.nl.d: nl/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.no.d: no/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.pl.d: pl/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.pt.d: pt/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.ru.d: ru/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.se.d: se/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.tr.d: tr/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/%.html.zh-cn.d: zh-cn/%.wml .deps/.stamp
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+	tmpfile=`mktemp -t tmp.XXXXXXX` \
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+	lang=`dirname $<` && \
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+	OUT=`echo $@ | sed -e 's,\.deps/\(.*\)\.d$$,\1,'` && \
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+	wml $(WMLOPT) -I $$lang -I $(WMLBASE)/$$lang -D LANG=$$lang $< -o $$OUT --depend | tee $$tmpfile > $@ && \
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+	sed -e s',\(^[^ ]*\):,.deps/\1.d:,' < $$tmpfile >> $@ && \
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+	rm -f $$tmpfile
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+.deps/.stamp:
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+	[ -d .deps ] || mkdir .deps
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+	touch "$@"
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+
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+dep: $(DEPFILES)
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+clean:
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+	rm -f $(HTMLFILES) $(DEPFILES)
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+	for sub in $(SUBDIRS); do \
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+		$(MAKE) -C "$$sub" WMLBASE=../$(WMLBASE) clean; \
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+	done
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+
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+include $(DEPFILES)
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+include $(WMLBASE)/Makefile.common
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+## translation metadata
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+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
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+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
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+
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+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Tor Overview" CHARSET="UTF-8" ANNOUNCE_RSS="yes"
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+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
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+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
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+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
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+    <a href="<page about/about>">About</a>
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+  </div>
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+  <div id="maincol">
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+    <h1>Tor Overview</h1>
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+    <p>Tor is a network of virtual tunnels that allows people and groups to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. It also enables software developers to create new communication tools with built-in privacy features. Tor provides the foundation for a range of applications that allow organizations and individuals to share information over public networks without compromising their privacy.</p>
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+    <p>Individuals use Tor to keep websites from tracking them and their family members, or to connect to news sites, instant messaging services, and the like when these are blocked by their local Internet providers. Tor's <a href="#">hidden services</a> let users publish web sites and other services without needing to reveal the location of the site. Individuals also use Tor for socially sensitive communication: chat rooms and web forums for rape and abuse survivors, or people with illnesses.</p>
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+    <p>Journalists use Tor to communicate more safely with whistleblowers and dissidents. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) use Tor to allow their workers to connect to their home website while they're in a foreign country, without notifying everybody nearby that they're working with that organization.</p>
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+    <p>Groups such as Indymedia recommend Tor for safeguarding their members' online privacy and security. Activist groups like the <a href="http://www.eff.org/">Electronic Frontier Foundation</a> (EFF) recommend Tor as a mechanism for maintaining civil liberties online. Corporations use Tor as a safe way to conduct competitive analysis, and to protect sensitive procurement patterns from eavesdroppers. They also use it to replace traditional VPNs, which reveal the exact amount and timing of communication. Which locations have employees working late? Which locations have employees consulting job-hunting websites? Which research divisions are communicating with the company's patent lawyers?</p>
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+    <p>A branch of the U.S. Navy uses Tor for open source intelligence gathering, and one of its teams used Tor while deployed in the Middle East recently. Law enforcement uses Tor for visiting or surveilling web sites without leaving government IP addresses in their web logs, and for security during sting operations.</p>
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+    <p>The <a href="<page about/corepeople>">variety of people</a> who use Tor is actually part of <a href="<page about/overview>">what makes it so secure</a>. Tor hides you among the other users on the network, so the more populous and diverse the user base for Tor is, the more your anonymity will be protected.</p>
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+  </div>
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+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
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+  <div id = "sidecol">
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+#include "side.wmi"
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+#include "info.wmi"
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+  </div>
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+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
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+</div>
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+<!-- END CONTENT -->
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+#include <foot.wmi>
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+## translation metadata
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+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
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+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Board of Directors" CHARSET="UTF-8" ANNOUNCE_RSS="yes"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+	<div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/board>">Board of Directors</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+	<div id="maincol">
13
+  	<h1>Board of Directors</h1>
14
+    <table>
15
+    	<tr>
16
+        <td class="beige">
17
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
18
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
19
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
20
+        </td>
21
+        <td>
22
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
23
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
24
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
25
+        </td>
26
+      </tr>
27
+      <tr>
28
+        <td>
29
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
30
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
31
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
32
+        </td>
33
+        <td class="beige">
34
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
35
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
36
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
37
+        </td>
38
+      </tr>
39
+      <tr>
40
+        <td class="beige">
41
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
42
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
43
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
44
+        </td>
45
+        <td>
46
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
47
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
48
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
49
+        </td>
50
+      </tr>
51
+      <tr>
52
+        <td>
53
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
54
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
55
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
56
+        </td>
57
+        <td class="beige">
58
+          <div class="name">Board Member Name</div>
59
+          <div class="caps">Board Member Title</div>
60
+          <p>Board Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
61
+        </td>
62
+      </tr>
63
+    </table>
64
+    <!-- END TABLE -->
65
+  </div>
66
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
67
+  <div id = "sidecol">
68
+#include "side.wmi"
69
+#include "info.wmi"
70
+  </div>
71
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
72
+</div>
73
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
74
+#include <foot.wmi> 
75
+ 
0 76
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,39 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 22359 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Contact" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+
7
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
8
+	<div id="breadcrumbs">
9
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
11
+    <a href="<page about/contact>">Contact</a>
12
+  </div>
13
+  <div id="maincol">
14
+    <h2>Tor: Contact</h2>
15
+    
16
+    <p>First, if you have a problem or question about using Tor, go look at the <a href="<page docs/documentation>#Support">Support section</a> for how to proceed. The Tor developers spend most of their time developing Tor, and there are no people devoted to user support, so try to help yourself before <a href="<page docs/faq>#SupportMail">politely trying to find a volunteer</a>.</p>
17
+    
18
+    <p>If you really do need to reach us, here are some approaches. All of these addresses are @torproject.org. Note that in practice most of them go to the same small group of people, so please be patient and <a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html">helpful</a>, and please make sure to write your mail in English.</p>
19
+    
20
+    <ul>
21
+      <li><tt>tor-assistants</tt> is the catch-all address for everything. If you'd like to ask a more directed question, please see the descriptions below.</li>
22
+      <li><tt>tor-ops</tt> gets to the people who manage the directory authorities. Use this if you run a Tor relay and have a question or problem with your relay.</li>
23
+      <li><tt>tor-webmaster</tt> can fix typos on the website, change wrong statements or directions on the website, and add new sections and paragraphs that you send us. You might want to make a draft of your new sections on <a href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki">the Tor wiki</a> first.</li>
24
+      <li><tt>tor-volunteer</tt> wants to hear about your documents, patches, testing, experiences with supporting applications, and so forth inspired by our <a href="<page getinvolved/volunteer>">volunteer page</a> (or other problems you've fixed or documented about using Tor). There's no need to mail us before you start working on something -- like all volunteer Internet projects, we hear from a lot of excited people who vanish soon after, so we are most interested in hearing about actual progress.</li>
25
+      <li><tt>tor-translation</tt> can put new <a href="<page getinvolved/translation>">website translations</a> into place, and help answer questions about existing and new translations.</li>
26
+      <li><tt>tordnsel</tt> is the alias for the people responsible for the tordns exitlist.</li>
27
+      <li><tt>donations</tt> is for questions and comments about <a href="<page donate/donate>">getting money to the developers</a>. More donations means <a href="<page docs/faq>#Funding">more Tor</a>. We're happy to help think about creative ways for you to contribute.</li>
28
+      <li><tt>execdir</tt> is for press/media, questions and comments about Tor the non-profit corporation: trademark questions, affiliation and coordination, major gifts, contract inquiries, licensing and certification, etc.</li>
29
+    </ul>
30
+  </div>
31
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
32
+  <div id = "sidecol">
33
+#include "side.wmi"
34
+#include "info.wmi"
35
+  </div>
36
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
37
+</div>
38
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
39
+#include <foot.wmi>   
0 40
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,74 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Past Contributors" CHARSET="UTF-8" ANNOUNCE_RSS="yes"
5
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
6
+	<div id="breadcrumbs">
7
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
8
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/contributors>">Past Contributors</a>
10
+  </div>
11
+	<div id="maincol">
12
+  	<h1>Past Contributors</h1>
13
+    <table>
14
+    	<tr>
15
+        <td class="beige">
16
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
17
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
18
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
19
+        </td>
20
+        <td>
21
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
22
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
23
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
24
+        </td>
25
+      </tr>
26
+      <tr>
27
+        <td>
28
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
29
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
30
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
31
+        </td>
32
+        <td class="beige">
33
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
34
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
35
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
36
+        </td>
37
+      </tr>
38
+      <tr>
39
+        <td class="beige">
40
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
41
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
42
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
43
+        </td>
44
+        <td>
45
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
46
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
47
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
48
+        </td>
49
+      </tr>
50
+      <tr>
51
+        <td>
52
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
53
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
54
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
55
+        </td>
56
+        <td class="beige">
57
+          <div class="name">Contributor Name</div>
58
+          <div class="caps">Contributor Title</div>
59
+          <p>Contributor is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
60
+        </td>
61
+      </tr>
62
+    </table>
63
+    <!-- END TABLE -->
64
+  </div>
65
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
66
+  
67
+  <div id = "sidecol">
68
+#include "side.wmi"
69
+#include "info.wmi"
70
+  </div>
71
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
72
+</div>
73
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
74
+#include <foot.wmi> 
0 75
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,74 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Core People" CHARSET="UTF-8" ANNOUNCE_RSS="yes"
5
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
6
+	<div id="breadcrumbs">
7
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
8
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/corepeople>">Tor People</a>
10
+  </div>
11
+	<div id="maincol">
12
+  	<h1>Core Tor People</h1>
13
+    <table>
14
+    	<tr>
15
+        <td class="beige">
16
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
17
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
18
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
19
+        </td>
20
+        <td>
21
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
22
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
23
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
24
+        </td>
25
+      </tr>
26
+      <tr>
27
+        <td>
28
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
29
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
30
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
31
+        </td>
32
+        <td class="beige">
33
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
34
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
35
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
36
+        </td>
37
+      </tr>
38
+      <tr>
39
+        <td class="beige">
40
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
41
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
42
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
43
+        </td>
44
+        <td>
45
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
46
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
47
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
48
+        </td>
49
+      </tr>
50
+      <tr>
51
+        <td>
52
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
53
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
54
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
55
+        </td>
56
+        <td class="beige">
57
+          <div class="name">Staff Member Name</div>
58
+          <div class="caps">Staff Member Title</div>
59
+          <p>Staff Member is tackling the growing needs for easy to configure packages on many operating systems. She’s also automating the build system and producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</p>
60
+        </td>
61
+      </tr>
62
+    </table>
63
+    <!-- END TABLE -->
64
+
65
+  </div>
66
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
67
+  <div id = "sidecol">
68
+#include "side.wmi"
69
+#include "info.wmi"
70
+  </div>
71
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
72
+</div>
73
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
74
+#include <foot.wmi> 
0 75
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,47 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 2-medium
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Future of Tor" CHARSET="UTF-8" <p>
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/future>">The Future of Tor</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <h1>The future of Tor</a></h1>
14
+    
15
+    <p>
16
+    Providing a usable anonymizing network on the Internet today is an
17
+    ongoing challenge. We want software that meets users' needs. We also
18
+    want to keep the network up and running in a way that handles as many
19
+    users as possible. Security and usability don't have to be at odds:
20
+    As Tor's usability increases, it will attract more users, which will
21
+    increase the possible sources and destinations of each communication,
22
+    thus increasing security for everyone.
23
+    We're making progress, but we need your help.  Please consider
24
+    <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">running a relay</a>
25
+    or <a href="<page getinvolved/volunteer>">volunteering</a> as a
26
+    <a href="<page docs/documentation>#Developers">developer</a>.
27
+    </p>
28
+    
29
+    <p>
30
+    Ongoing trends in law, policy, and technology threaten anonymity as never
31
+    before, undermining our ability to speak and read freely online. These
32
+    trends also undermine national security and critical infrastructure by
33
+    making communication among individuals, organizations, corporations,
34
+    and governments more vulnerable to analysis. Each new user and relay
35
+    provides additional diversity, enhancing Tor's ability to put control
36
+    over your security and privacy back into your hands.
37
+    </p>
38
+  </div>
39
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
40
+  <div id = "sidecol">
41
+#include "side.wmi"
42
+#include "info.wmi"
43
+  </div>
44
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
45
+</div>
46
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
47
+#include <foot.wmi>
0 48
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,210 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 22179 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 4-optional
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor: Google Summer of Code 2010" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/gsoc>">Google Summer of Code 2010</a>
10
+  </div>
11
+  <div id="maincol"> 
12
+    <h2>Tor: Google Summer of Code 2010</h2>
13
+    <hr />
14
+    
15
+    <p>
16
+    In the last three years, The Tor Project in collaboration with <a
17
+    href="https://www.eff.org/">The Electronic Frontier Foundation</a>
18
+    successfully took part in
19
+    <a href="http://code.google.com/soc/2007/eff/about.html">Google Summer of Code
20
+    2007</a>, <a href="http://code.google.com/soc/2008/eff/about.html">2008</a>,
21
+    and <a href="http://socghop.appspot.com/gsoc/org/home/google/gsoc2009/eff">2009</a>.
22
+    In total we had 17 students as full-time developers for the summers of 2007 to
23
+    2009. Now we've been accepted to <a
24
+    href="https://socghop.appspot.com/gsoc/org/show/google/gsoc2010/tor">Google
25
+    Summer of Code 2010</a>!
26
+    </p>
27
+    
28
+    <p>
29
+    The <a
30
+    href="http://socghop.appspot.com/document/show/gsoc_program/google/gsoc2010/timeline">deadline</a>
31
+    for your <a
32
+    href="http://socghop.appspot.com/document/show/gsoc_program/google/gsoc2010/faqs#student_apply">application</a>
33
+    is <b>April 9, 2010</b> at 19:00 UTC.
34
+    </p>
35
+    
36
+    <p>
37
+    You must be self-motivated and able to work independently. We have
38
+    a thriving community of interested developers on the IRC channel and
39
+    mailing lists, and we're eager to work with you, brainstorm about design,
40
+    and so on, but you need to be able to manage your own time, and you
41
+    need to already be somewhat familiar with how free software development on the
42
+    Internet works.
43
+    </p>
44
+    
45
+    <p>
46
+    Working on Tor is rewarding because:
47
+    </p>
48
+    
49
+    <ul>
50
+    <li>You can work your own hours in your own locations. As long as you
51
+    get the job done, we don't care about the process.</li>
52
+    <li>We only write free (open source) software. The tools you make won't
53
+    be locked down or rot on a shelf.</li>
54
+    <li>You will work with a world-class team of anonymity experts and
55
+    developers on what is already the largest and most active strong anonymity
56
+    network ever.</li>
57
+    <li>The work you do could contribute to academic publications &mdash;
58
+    Tor development raises many open questions and interesting problems
59
+    in the field of <a href="http://freehaven.net/anonbib/">anonymity
60
+    systems</a>.</li>
61
+    </ul>
62
+    
63
+    <a id="GettingInvolved"></a>
64
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#GettingInvolved">How To Get Involved</a></h2>
65
+    
66
+    <p>
67
+    The best way to get involved is to come listen on IRC (both "#tor" and
68
+    "#tor-dev"), read our docs and other webpages, try out the various tools
69
+    that are related to the projects that interest you, and ask questions
70
+    as they come to you: <a href="<page docs/documentation>#UpToSpeed">Getting
71
+    up to speed</a>.
72
+    </p>
73
+    
74
+    <p>
75
+    In addition to getting some more development work
76
+    done on Tor and related applications, Google and Tor are most interested
77
+    in getting students involved in Tor development in a way that keeps them
78
+    involved after the summer too. That means we will give priority to students
79
+    who have demonstrated continued interest and responsiveness. We will require
80
+    students to write public status report updates for our community, either by
81
+    blogging or sending mail to our mailing list. We want to ensure that the
82
+    community and the student can both benefit from each other.
83
+    </p>
84
+    
85
+    <p>
86
+    When it comes time for us to choose projects, our impression of how well
87
+    you'll fit into our community &mdash; and how good you are at taking
88
+    the initiative to do things &mdash; will be at least as important as
89
+    the actual project you'll be working on.
90
+    </p>
91
+    
92
+    <a id="Ideas"></a>
93
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Ideas">Ideas List</a></h2>
94
+    
95
+    <p>
96
+    This year, we have two ideas lists: one for projects to
97
+    <a href="<page getinvolved/volunteer>#Projects">help develop Tor</a>,
98
+    and one for <a href="https://www.eff.org/gsoc2010">EFF's projects</a>.
99
+    </p>
100
+    
101
+    <p>
102
+    The best kind of ideas are A) ones that we know we need done real soon
103
+    now (you can get a sense of urgency from the priority on the wishlist,
104
+    and from talking to the potential mentors), and B) ones where it's
105
+    clear what needs to be done, at least for the first few steps. Lots of
106
+    students try to bite off open-ended research topics; but if you're going
107
+    to be spending the first half of your summer figuring out what exactly
108
+    you should code, and there's a chance that the conclusion will be "oh,
109
+    that isn't actually a good idea to build", then your proposal will make
110
+    us very nervous. Try to figure out how much you can actually fit in a
111
+    summer, break the work down into manageable pieces, and most importantly,
112
+    figure out how to make sure your incremental milestones are actually
113
+    useful &mdash; if you don't finish everything in your plan, we want to
114
+    know that you'll still have produced something useful.
115
+    </p>
116
+    
117
+    <a id="Template"></a>
118
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#Template">Application Template</a></h2>
119
+    
120
+    <p>
121
+    Please use the following template for your application, to make sure you
122
+    provide enough information for us to evaluate you and your proposal.
123
+    </p>
124
+    
125
+    <ol>
126
+    
127
+    <li>What project would you like to work on? Use our ideas lists as a starting
128
+    point or make up your own idea. Your proposal should include high-level
129
+    descriptions of what you're going to do, with more details about the
130
+    parts you expect to be tricky. Your proposal should also try to break
131
+    down the project into tasks of a fairly fine granularity, and convince
132
+    us you have a plan for finishing it.</li>
133
+    
134
+    <li>Point us to a code sample: something good and clean to demonstrate
135
+    that you know what you're doing, ideally from an existing project.</li>
136
+    
137
+    <li>Why do you want to work with The Tor Project / EFF in
138
+    particular?</li>
139
+    
140
+    <li>Tell us about your experiences in free software development
141
+    environments. We especially want to hear examples of how you have
142
+    collaborated with others rather than just working on a project by
143
+    yourself.</li>
144
+    
145
+    <li>Will you be working full-time on the project for the summer, or will
146
+    you have other commitments too (a second job, classes, etc)? If you won't
147
+    be available full-time, please explain, and list timing if you know them
148
+    for other major deadlines (e.g. exams). Having other activities isn't
149
+    a deal-breaker, but we don't want to be surprised.</li>
150
+    
151
+    <li>Will your project need more work and/or maintenance after the summer
152
+    ends? What are the chances you will stick around and help out with that
153
+    and other related projects?</li>
154
+    
155
+    <li>What is your ideal approach to keeping everybody informed of your
156
+    progress, problems, and questions over the course of the project? Said
157
+    another way, how much of a "manager" will you need your mentor to be?</li>
158
+    
159
+    <li>What school are you attending? What year are you, and what's your
160
+    major/degree/focus? If you're part of a research group, which one?</li>
161
+    
162
+    <li>How can we contact you to ask you further questions? Google doesn't
163
+    share your contact details with us automatically, so you should include
164
+    that in your application. In addition, what's your IRC nickname?
165
+    Interacting with us on IRC will help us get to know you, and help you
166
+    get to know our community.</li>
167
+    
168
+    <li>Is there anything else we should know that will make us like your
169
+    project more?</li>
170
+    
171
+    </ol>
172
+    
173
+    <p>
174
+    We have picked out 10+ mentors for this year &mdash; most of the
175
+    people on the <a href="<page about/people>#Core">core Tor development team</a>
176
+    plus a few people from <a href="http://www.eff.org/about/staff">EFF's staff</a>
177
+    &mdash; so we should be able to accommodate a wide variety of projects,
178
+    ranging from work on Tor itself to work on supporting or peripheral
179
+    projects. We can figure out which mentor is appropriate while we're
180
+    discussing the project you have in mind. We plan to assign a primary
181
+    mentor to each student, along with one or two assistant mentors to help
182
+    answer questions and help you integrate with the broader Tor community.
183
+    </p>
184
+    
185
+    <p>
186
+    If you're interested, you can either contact the <a href="<page
187
+    about/contact>">tor-assistants list</a> with a brief summary of your proposal
188
+    and we'll give you feedback, or just jump right in and post your ideas
189
+    and goals to the <a href="<page docs/documentation>#MailingLists">or-talk
190
+    mailing list</a>. Make sure to be responsive during the application
191
+    selection period; if we like your application but you never answer our
192
+    mails asking for more information, that's not a good sign.
193
+    </p>
194
+    
195
+    <p>
196
+    The more applications we get, the more likely Google is to give us good
197
+    students. So if you haven't filled up your summer plans yet, please
198
+    consider spending some time working with us to make Tor better!
199
+    </p>
200
+  </div>
201
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
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+  <div id = "sidecol">
203
+#include "side.wmi"
204
+#include "info.wmi"
205
+  </div>
206
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
207
+</div>
208
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
209
+#include <foot.wmi>
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+
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+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 22308 $
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+# Translation-Priority: 2-medium
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+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Overview" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/about>">Overview</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <a name="overview"></a>
14
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#overview">Tor: Overview</a></h2>
15
+    <!-- BEGIN SIDEBAR -->
16
+    <div class="sidebar-left">
17
+      <h3>Topics</h3>
18
+      <ul>
19
+        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#overview">Overview</a></li>
20
+        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#whyweneedtor">Why we need Tor</a></li>
21
+        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#thesolution">The Solution</a></li>
22
+        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#hiddenservices">Hidden services</a></li>
23
+        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#stayinganonymous">Staying anonymous</a></li>
24
+        <li><a href="<page about/overview>#thefutureoftor">The future of Tor</a></li>
25
+      </ul>
26
+    </div>
27
+    <!-- END SIDEBAR -->
28
+    
29
+    <hr />
30
+    
31
+    <p>
32
+    Tor is a network of virtual tunnels that allows people and groups to
33
+    improve their privacy and security on the Internet.  It also enables
34
+    software developers to create new communication tools
35
+    with built-in privacy features.  Tor provides the foundation for
36
+    a range of applications that allow organizations and individuals
37
+    to share information over public networks without compromising their
38
+    privacy.
39
+    </p>
40
+    
41
+    <p>
42
+    Individuals use Tor to keep websites from tracking them and their family
43
+    members, or to connect to news sites, instant messaging services, or the
44
+    like when these are blocked by their local Internet providers.  Tor's <a
45
+    href="<page docs/hidden-services>">hidden services</a>
46
+    let users publish web sites and other services without needing to reveal
47
+    the location of the site. Individuals also use Tor for socially sensitive
48
+    communication: chat rooms and web forums for rape and abuse survivors,
49
+    or people with illnesses.
50
+    </p>
51
+    
52
+    <p>
53
+    Journalists use Tor to communicate more safely with whistleblowers and
54
+    dissidents. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) use Tor to allow their
55
+    workers to connect to their home website while they're in a foreign
56
+    country, without notifying everybody nearby that they're working with
57
+    that organization.
58
+    </p>
59
+    
60
+    <p>
61
+    Groups such as Indymedia recommend Tor for safeguarding their members'
62
+    online privacy and security. Activist groups like the Electronic Frontier
63
+    Foundation (EFF) recommend Tor as a mechanism for
64
+    maintaining civil liberties online. Corporations use Tor as a safe way
65
+    to conduct competitive analysis, and to protect sensitive procurement
66
+    patterns from eavesdroppers. They also use it to replace traditional
67
+    VPNs, which reveal the exact amount and timing of communication. Which
68
+    locations have employees working late? Which locations have employees
69
+    consulting job-hunting websites? Which research divisions are communicating
70
+    with the company's patent lawyers?
71
+    </p>
72
+    
73
+    <p>
74
+    A branch of the U.S. Navy uses Tor for open source intelligence
75
+    gathering, and one of its teams used Tor while deployed in the Middle
76
+    East recently. Law enforcement uses Tor for visiting or surveilling
77
+    web sites without leaving government IP addresses in their web logs,
78
+    and for security during sting operations.
79
+    </p>
80
+    
81
+    <p>
82
+    The variety of people who use Tor is actually <a
83
+    href="http://freehaven.net/doc/fc03/econymics.pdf">part of what makes
84
+    it so secure</a>.  Tor hides you among <a href="<page about/torusers>">the
85
+    other users on the network</a>,
86
+    so the more populous and diverse the user base for Tor is, the more your
87
+    anonymity will be protected.
88
+    </p>
89
+    
90
+    <a name="whyweneedtor"></a>
91
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#whyweneedtor">Why we need Tor</a></h3>
92
+    
93
+    <p>
94
+    Using Tor protects you against a common form of Internet surveillance
95
+    known as "traffic analysis."  Traffic analysis can be used to infer
96
+    who is talking to whom over a public network.  Knowing the source
97
+    and destination of your Internet traffic allows others to track your
98
+    behavior and interests.  This can impact your checkbook if, for example,
99
+    an e-commerce site uses price discrimination based on your country or
100
+    institution of origin.  It can even threaten your job and physical safety
101
+    by revealing who and where you are. For example, if you're travelling
102
+    abroad and you connect to your employer's computers to check or send mail,
103
+    you can inadvertently reveal your national origin and professional
104
+    affiliation to anyone observing the network, even if the connection
105
+    is encrypted.
106
+    </p>
107
+    
108
+    <p>
109
+    How does traffic analysis work?  Internet data packets have two parts:
110
+    a data payload and a header used for routing.  The data payload is
111
+    whatever is being sent, whether that's an email message, a web page, or an
112
+    audio file.  Even if you encrypt the data payload of your communications,
113
+    traffic analysis still reveals a great deal about what you're doing and,
114
+    possibly, what you're saying.  That's because it focuses on the header,
115
+    which discloses source, destination, size, timing, and so on.
116
+    </p>
117
+    
118
+    <p>
119
+    A basic problem for the privacy minded is that the recipient of your
120
+    communications can see that you sent it by looking at headers.  So can
121
+    authorized intermediaries like Internet service providers, and sometimes
122
+    unauthorized intermediaries as well.  A very simple form of traffic
123
+    analysis might involve sitting somewhere between sender and recipient on
124
+    the network, looking at headers.
125
+    </p>
126
+    
127
+    <p>
128
+    But there are also more powerful kinds of traffic analysis.  Some
129
+    attackers spy on multiple parts of the Internet and use sophisticated
130
+    statistical techniques to track the communications patterns of many
131
+    different organizations and individuals.  Encryption does not help against
132
+    these attackers, since it only hides the content of Internet traffic, not
133
+    the headers.
134
+    </p>
135
+    
136
+    <a name="thesolution"></a>
137
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#thesolution">The solution: a distributed, anonymous network</a></h3>
138
+    
139
+    <p>
140
+    Tor helps to reduce the risks of both simple and sophisticated traffic
141
+    analysis by distributing your transactions over several places on the
142
+    Internet, so no single point can link you to your destination.  The idea
143
+    is similar to using a twisty, hard-to-follow route in order to throw off
144
+    somebody who is tailing you &mdash; and then periodically erasing your
145
+    footprints.  Instead of taking a direct route from source to
146
+    destination, data packets on the Tor network take a random pathway
147
+    through several relays that cover your tracks so no observer at any
148
+    single point can tell where the data came from or where it's going.
149
+    </p>
150
+    
151
+    <p><img alt="Tor circuit step one" src="$(IMGROOT)/htw1.png" /></p>
152
+    
153
+    <p>
154
+    To create a private network pathway with Tor, the user's software or
155
+    client incrementally builds a circuit of encrypted connections through
156
+    relays on the network.  The circuit is extended one hop at a time, and
157
+    each relay along the way knows only which relay gave it data and which
158
+    relay it is giving data to.  No individual relay ever knows the
159
+    complete path that a data packet has taken.  The client negotiates a
160
+    separate set of encryption keys for each hop along the circuit to ensure
161
+    that each hop can't trace these connections as they pass through.
162
+    </p>
163
+    
164
+    <p><img alt="Tor circuit step two" src="$(IMGROOT)/htw2.png" /></p>
165
+    
166
+    <p>
167
+    Once a circuit has been established, many kinds of data can be exchanged
168
+    and several different sorts of software applications can be deployed
169
+    over the Tor network.  Because each relay sees no more than one hop in
170
+    the circuit, neither an eavesdropper nor a compromised relay can use
171
+    traffic analysis to link the connection's source and destination.  Tor
172
+    only works for TCP streams and can be used by any application with SOCKS
173
+    support.
174
+    </p>
175
+    
176
+    <p>
177
+    For efficiency, the Tor software uses the same circuit for connections
178
+    that happen within the same ten minutes or so.  Later requests are given a
179
+    new circuit, to keep people from linking your earlier actions to the new
180
+    ones.
181
+    </p>
182
+    
183
+    <p><img alt="Tor circuit step three" src="$(IMGROOT)/htw3.png" /></p>
184
+    
185
+    
186
+    <a name="hiddenservices"></a>
187
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#hiddenservices">Hidden services</a></h3>
188
+    
189
+    <p>
190
+    Tor also makes it possible for users to hide their locations while
191
+    offering various kinds of services, such as web publishing or an instant
192
+    messaging server.  Using Tor "rendezvous points," other Tor users can
193
+    connect to these hidden services, each without knowing the other's
194
+    network identity.  This hidden service functionality could allow Tor
195
+    users to set up a website where people publish material without worrying
196
+    about censorship.  Nobody would be able to determine who was offering
197
+    the site, and nobody who offered the site would know who was posting to it.
198
+    Learn more about <a href="<page docs/tor-hidden-service>">configuring
199
+    hidden services</a> and how the <a href="<page docs/hidden-services>">hidden
200
+    service protocol</a> works.
201
+    </p>
202
+    
203
+    <a name="stayinganonymous"></a>
204
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#stayinganonymous">Staying anonymous</a></h3>
205
+    
206
+    <p>
207
+    Tor can't solve all anonymity problems.  It focuses only on
208
+    protecting the transport of data.  You need to use protocol-specific
209
+    support software if you don't want the sites you visit to see your
210
+    identifying information. For example, you can use web proxies such as
211
+    Privoxy while web browsing to block cookies and withhold information
212
+    about your browser type.
213
+    </p>
214
+    
215
+    <p>
216
+    Also, to protect your anonymity, be smart.  Don't provide your name
217
+    or other revealing information in web forms.  Be aware that, like all
218
+    anonymizing networks that are fast enough for web browsing, Tor does not
219
+    provide protection against end-to-end timing attacks: If your attacker
220
+    can watch the traffic coming out of your computer, and also the traffic
221
+    arriving at your chosen destination, he can use statistical analysis to
222
+    discover that they are part of the same circuit.
223
+    </p>
224
+    
225
+    <a name="thefutureoftor"></a>
226
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#thefutureoftor">The future of Tor</a></h3>
227
+    
228
+    <p>
229
+    Providing a usable anonymizing network on the Internet today is an
230
+    ongoing challenge. We want software that meets users' needs. We also
231
+    want to keep the network up and running in a way that handles as many
232
+    users as possible. Security and usability don't have to be at odds:
233
+    As Tor's usability increases, it will attract more users, which will
234
+    increase the possible sources and destinations of each communication,
235
+    thus increasing security for everyone.
236
+    We're making progress, but we need your help.  Please consider
237
+    <a href="<page docs/tor-doc-relay>">running a relay</a>
238
+    or <a href="<page getinvolved/volunteer>">volunteering</a> as a
239
+    <a href="<page docs/documentation>#Developers">developer</a>.
240
+    </p>
241
+    
242
+    <p>
243
+    Ongoing trends in law, policy, and technology threaten anonymity as never
244
+    before, undermining our ability to speak and read freely online. These
245
+    trends also undermine national security and critical infrastructure by
246
+    making communication among individuals, organizations, corporations,
247
+    and governments more vulnerable to analysis. Each new user and relay
248
+    provides additional diversity, enhancing Tor's ability to put control
249
+    over your security and privacy back into your hands.
250
+    </p>
251
+    
252
+  </div>
253
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
254
+  <div id = "sidecol">
255
+#include "side.wmi"
256
+#include "info.wmi"
257
+  </div>
258
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
259
+</div>
260
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
261
+#include <foot.wmi> 
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+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 22448 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor: People" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+	<div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/board>">Board of Directors</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+  <div class="maincol">
13
+    <h2>Tor: People</h2>
14
+    
15
+    #<!-- BEGIN SIDEBAR -->
16
+    #<div class="sidebar-left">
17
+    #<h3>Sections</h3>
18
+    #<ul>
19
+    #<li><a href="<page about/corepeople>#Core">Core Tor People</a></li>
20
+    #<li><a href="<page about/people>#Board">Board of Directors</a></li>
21
+    #<li><a href="<page about/people>#GSoC">Summer Students</a></li>
22
+    #<li><a href="<page about/people>#Translators">Translators</a></li>
23
+    #<li><a href="<page about/people>#Volunteers">Volunteers</a></li>
24
+    #<li><a href="<page about/people>#Past">Past Contributors</a></li>
25
+    #</ul>
26
+    #</div>
27
+    #<!-- END SIDEBAR -->
28
+    
29
+    <p>The Tor Project is a 501(c)(3) non-profit based in
30
+    the United States. The official address of the organization is:
31
+    </p>
32
+    
33
+    <address>
34
+    The Tor Project<br />
35
+    969 Main Street, Suite 206<br />
36
+    Walpole, MA 02081 USA<br /><br />
37
+    </address>
38
+    
39
+    <p>The organization consists of many volunteers and a few employees.
40
+    Please don't contact us individually about Tor topics &mdash; if you
41
+    have a problem or question, please look through the <a href="<page
42
+    about/contact>">contact page</a> for appropriate addresses.</p>
43
+    
44
+    <div class="underline"></div>
45
+    <a id="Core"></a>
46
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Core">Core Tor people:</a></h3>
47
+    
48
+    <dl>
49
+    <dt>Carolyn Anhalt (Community and Translation
50
+    Coordinator)</dt><dd>Responsible for growing Tor's community
51
+    moderators and translators.</dd>
52
+    
53
+    <dt>Jacob Appelbaum (Developer and Advocate)</dt><dd>Runs
54
+    the <a href="https://check.torproject.org/">Tor DNSEL</a> <a
55
+    href="http://exitlist.torproject.org/">site</a>, and also the in-progress
56
+    Tor weather site.</dd>
57
+    
58
+    <dt>Erinn Clark (Packaging and Build Automation)</dt><dd>Erinn is tackling
59
+    the growing needs for easy to install and configure packages on a variety
60
+    of operating systems.  Also working on automating the build system and
61
+    producing nightly builds for all operating systems we support.</dd>
62
+    
63
+    <dt>Christopher Davis</dt><dd>Worked during Google Summer of Code 2009
64
+    on porting Polipo to Windows and on helping with the libevent bufferevent
65
+    code. Now he's the Polipo maintainer.</dd>
66
+    
67
+    <dt>Roger Dingledine (Project Leader; Director)</dt><dd>Original
68
+    developer of Tor; now plays pretty much all the roles to keep everything
69
+    on track.</dd>
70
+    
71
+    <dt>Matt Edman (Developer)</dt><dd>Lead developer for <a href="<page
72
+    projects/vidalia>">Vidalia</a>, a cross-platform Tor GUI included in the
73
+    Windows and OS X bundles.</dd>
74
+    
75
+    <dt>Nathan Freitas</dt><dd>The driving force behind Tor on the Android
76
+    platform in the form of <a href="<page docs/android>">Orbot</a>.</dd>
77
+    
78
+    <dt>Christian Fromme (Developer)</dt><dd>Christian works on all things
79
+    python for Tor.  He enhanced and maintains a slew of codebases for us,
80
+    such as the get-tor email auto-responder, check.torproject.org, bridge
81
+    db, tor weather, tor controller, tor flow, etc.</dd>
82
+    
83
+    <dt>Melissa Gilroy (CFO and Internal Audit)</dt><dd>With a strong
84
+    background in non-profit accounting and auditing, Melissa is in charge of
85
+    Tor's finances, audit compliance, and keeping Tor's financial operations
86
+    moving along.</dd>
87
+    
88
+    <dt>Sebastian Hahn</dt><dd> Worked during the 2008 Google Summer of
89
+    Code on a networking application to automatically carry out tests for
90
+    Tor and during the 2009 Google Summer of Code on expanding Thandy to
91
+    include BitTorrent support. Generally helps out a lot.</dd>
92
+    
93
+    <dt>Damian Johnson</dt><dd>Builds a command-line application for monitoring
94
+    Tor relays, providing real-time status information such as the current
95
+    configuration, bandwidth usage, message log, etc. (<a
96
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/arm/trunk/README">code</a>).</dd>
97
+    
98
+    <dt>Andrew Lewman (Executive Director; Director; <a href="<page
99
+    press/press>">press contact</a>)</dt><dd>Manages the business operations
100
+    of The Tor Project, Inc.  Plays roles of finance, advocacy, project
101
+    management, and general support.  General package hacker for Windows,
102
+    OS X, and various linux distributions.</dd>
103
+    
104
+    <dt>Karsten Loesing (Developer)</dt><dd>
105
+    Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of Code on <a
106
+    href="<gitblob>doc/spec/proposals/114-distributed-storage.txt">distributing
107
+    and securing the publishing and fetching of hidden
108
+    service descriptors</a>. Currently working on <a href="<page
109
+    projects/hidserv>">making hidden services faster and more reliable</a>,
110
+    and on <a href="http://metrics.torproject.org/">metrics</a>.</dd>
111
+    
112
+    <dt>Nick Mathewson (Chief architect; Director)</dt><dd>One of the
113
+    three original designers of Tor; does a lot of the ongoing design work.
114
+    One of the two main developers, along with Roger.</dd>
115
+    
116
+    <dt>Steven Murdoch (Researcher and Developer)</dt><dd>Researcher at
117
+    the University of Cambridge, currently funded by The Tor Project to
118
+    improve the security, performance, and usability of Tor. Creator of the
119
+    <a href="<page projects/torbrowser>">Tor Browser Bundle</a>.</dd>
120
+    
121
+    <dt>Peter Palfrader</dt><dd>Manages the Debian packages, runs one of
122
+    the directory authorities, runs the website and the wiki, and generally
123
+    helps out a lot.</dd>
124
+    
125
+    <dt>Mike Perry (Developer)</dt><dd>Author of <a
126
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/torflow/trunk/README">TorFlow</a>,
127
+    a Tor controller that builds paths through the Tor network and measures
128
+    various properties and behaviors, and new author of <a href="<page
129
+    projects/torbutton>">Torbutton</a>.</dd>
130
+    
131
+    <dt>Karen Reilly (Development Director)</dt><dd>Responsible for
132
+    fundraising, advocacy, and general marketing and outreach programs
133
+    for Tor.</dd>
134
+    
135
+    <dt>Runa A. Sandvik</dt><dd>Maintains the <a
136
+    href="https://translation.torproject.org/">Tor Translation
137
+    Portal</a>, and works on automatically converting our website wml
138
+    files to po files (and back) so that they can be handled by <a
139
+    href="http://translate.sourceforge.net/wiki/pootle/index">Pootle</a>.</dd>
140
+    
141
+    <dt>Paul Syverson</dt><dd>Inventor of <a
142
+    href="http://www.onion-router.net/">Onion Routing</a>, original designer
143
+    of Tor along with Roger and Nick, and project leader for original design,
144
+    development, and deployment of Tor. Currently helps out with research
145
+    and design.</dd>
146
+    </dl>
147
+    
148
+    <div class="underline"></div>
149
+    <a id="Board"></a>
150
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Board">The Tor Project Board of
151
+    Directors:</a></h3>
152
+    
153
+    <dl>
154
+    <dt>Meredith Hoban Dunn (Director)</dt><dd>Our audit committee chair. Her
155
+    role is to help us make sure we're able to pass our upcoming corporate
156
+    audits correctly, watch for internal fraud, tell us when we're doing
157
+    things in a non-standard way, and so on.</dd>
158
+    
159
+    <dt>Ian Goldberg (Director)</dt><dd>Cryptographer,
160
+    privacy expert, and professor; one of the designers of <a
161
+    href="http://www.cypherpunks.ca/otr/">Off-the-Record Messaging</a>.</dd>
162
+    
163
+    <dt>Xianghui (Isaac) Mao (Director)</dt><dd>Chinese blogging
164
+    and privacy activist.  His current activities can be found at <a
165
+    href="http://isaacmao.com/">his website</a>.</dd>
166
+    
167
+    <dt>Frank Rieger (Director)</dt><dd>CTO of <a
168
+    href="http://www.gsmk.de/">GSMK Cryptophone</a>.</dd>
169
+    
170
+    <dt>Wendy Seltzer (Director)</dt><dd>Lawyer,
171
+    cyberlaw professor, and founder of <a
172
+    href="http://chillingeffects.org/">ChillingEffects.org</a>.</dd>
173
+    
174
+    <dt>Along with Roger, Nick, and Andrew listed above as Directors.</dt>
175
+    </dl>
176
+    
177
+    <div class="underline"></div>
178
+    <a id="GSoC"></a>
179
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#GSoC">Google Summer of Code 2010 students:</a></h3>
180
+    
181
+    <dl>
182
+    <dt>Kevin Berry</dt><dd>Working on a database schema to support better
183
+    node churn metrics and on a more dynamic metrics website. Mentored by
184
+    Karsten Loesing.</dd>
185
+    <dt>Harry Bock</dt><dd>Working on TorBEL, a Tor bulk exit list tracker and
186
+    service designed to replace TorDNSEL. TorBEL is written in Python using
187
+    the torflow API. Mentored by Sebastian Hahn.</dd>
188
+    <dt>Kory Kirk</dt><dd>Worked during Google Summer of Code 2009 on
189
+    extending Torbutton. Now he's working on implementing hidden services
190
+    for our java Tor client. Mentored by Bruce Leidl.</dd>
191
+    <dt>John Schanck</dt><dd>Works on improving the automated detection of
192
+    misconfigured or malicious exit nodes. Mentored by Mike Perry.</dd>
193
+    </dl>
194
+    
195
+    <div class="underline"></div>
196
+    <a id="Translators"></a>
197
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Translators">Core translators:</a></h3>
198
+    
199
+    <dl>
200
+    <dt>Bogdan Drozdowski</dt><dd><a
201
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.pl">Polish</a>.</dd>
202
+    <dt>Tiago Faria</dt><dd>Portuguese.</dd>
203
+    <dt>fredzupy</dt><dd><a
204
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.fr">French</a>.</dd>
205
+    <dt>Ruben Garcia, plus further pages by <a
206
+    href="http://www.greentranslations.com/">Green Crescent</a></dt><dd><a
207
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.es">Spanish</a>.</dd>
208
+    <dt>Jens Kubieziel and Oliver Knapp</dt><dd><a
209
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.de">German</a>.</dd>
210
+    <dt>Pei Hanru and bridgefish</dt><dd><a
211
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.zh-cn">Simplified Chinese</a>.</dd>
212
+    <dt>Jan Reister</dt><dd><a
213
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.it">Italian</a>.</dd>
214
+    <dt>Masaki Taniguchi</dt><dd><a
215
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.ja">Japanese</a>.</dd>
216
+    <dt>Jan Woning</dt><dd><a
217
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.nl">Dutch</a>.</dd>
218
+    <dt>ygrek</dt><dd><a
219
+    href="https://www.torproject.org/index.html.ru">Russian</a>.</dd>
220
+    </dl>
221
+    
222
+    <div class="underline"></div>
223
+    <a id="Volunteers"></a>
224
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Volunteers">More volunteers:</a></h3>
225
+    
226
+    <dl>
227
+    <dt>Anonym</dt><dd>Maintainer of the Incognito LiveCD.</dd>
228
+    <dt>Kevin Bankston</dt><dd>EFF lawyer who helped write the <a
229
+    href="<page eff/tor-legal-faq>">Tor Legal FAQ</a> and
230
+    tirelessly answers the phone when somebody in the world has a legal
231
+    question about Tor.</dd>
232
+    <dt>Marco Bonetti</dt><dd>Focusing on MobileTor for the iPhone.</dd>
233
+    <dt>Kasimir Gabert</dt><dd>Maintains the <a
234
+    href="https://torstatus.kgprog.com/">TorStatus</a> statistics pages.</dd>
235
+    <dt>Robert Hogan</dt><dd>Developer for the <a
236
+    href="http://tork.sf.net/">TorK</a> Tor controller.</dd>
237
+    <dt>Fabian Keil</dt><dd>One of the core Privoxy developers, and also a
238
+    Tor fan. He's the reason Tor and Privoxy still work well together.</dd>
239
+    <dt>Bruce Leidl</dt><dd>Working on a Tor client in Java.</dd>
240
+    <dt>Julius Mittenzwei</dt><dd>A lawyer with the CCC in
241
+    Germany. Coordinates the German Tor community with respect to legal
242
+    questions and concerns.</dd>
243
+    <dt>Shava Nerad</dt><dd>Our former Development Director. She still works
244
+    on PR and community relations.</dd>
245
+    <dt>Linus Nordberg</dt><dd>Enjoys measuring the Tor network and helps
246
+    with outreach in the Nordic countries.</dd>
247
+    <dt>Lasse &Oslash;verlier</dt><dd>Writes research papers on Tor: attacks,
248
+    defenses, and resource management, especially for hidden services.</dd>
249
+    <dt>Martin Peck</dt><dd>Working on a VM-based transparent
250
+    proxying approach for Tor clients on Windows.</dd>
251
+    <dt>rovv (a pseudonym -- he's managed to stay anonymous even from
252
+    us!)</dt><dd>The most dedicated bug reporter we've ever heard from. He
253
+    must read Tor source code every day over breakfast.</dd>
254
+    <dt>tup (another pseudonym)</dt><dd>Periodically adds new features for
255
+    making Tor easier to use as a <a
256
+    href="https://trac.torproject.org/projects/tor/wiki/TheOnionRouter/TransparentProxy">transparent
257
+    proxy</a>. Also maintains the <a
258
+    href="http://p56soo2ibjkx23xo.onion/">TorDNSEL code</a>.</dd>
259
+    <dt>Kyle Williams</dt><dd>Developer for
260
+    JanusVM, a VMWare-based
261
+    transparent Tor proxy that makes Tor easier to set up and use.</dd>
262
+    <dt>Ethan Zuckerman</dt><dd>A blogger who has written some
263
+    <a href="http://www.ethanzuckerman.com/blog/?p=1019">interesting</a>
264
+    <a href="http://advocacy.globalvoicesonline.org/tools/guide/">tutorials</a>
265
+    for how, when, and whether to use Tor. He also teaches activists around
266
+    the world about Tor and related tools.</dd>
267
+    <dt>All our relay operators, people who write <a
268
+    href="http://freehaven.net/anonbib/">research papers</a> about Tor,
269
+    people who teach others about Tor, etc.</dt>
270
+    </dl>
271
+    
272
+    <div class="underline"></div>
273
+    <a id="Past"></a>
274
+    <h3><a class="anchor" href="#Past">Past thanks to:</a></h3>
275
+    
276
+    <dl>
277
+    <dt>John Bashinski</dt><dd> Contributed the initial rpm spec file.</dd>
278
+    <dt>Domenik Bork</dt><dd> Worked on
279
+    Configuration of Hidden Services with User Authorization in Vidalia (<a
280
+    href="http://trac.vidalia-project.net/browser/vidalia/branches/hidden-services">svn</a>) as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
281
+    <dt>Benedikt Boss</dt><dd>Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of Code on <a
282
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/topf/trunk/README">TOPF</a>,
283
+    a fuzzer for Tor; mentored by Roger.</dd>
284
+    <dt>Ren Bucholz</dt><dd>Our fine logo and images.</dd>
285
+    <dt>Fallon Chen</dt><dd> Worked on
286
+    Improving Tor Path Selection (<a
287
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewcvs.cgi/torflow/branches/gsoc2008/">svn</a>)
288
+    and <a
289
+    href="<gitblob>doc/spec/proposals/151-path-selection-improvements.txt">proposal
290
+    151</a> as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
291
+    <dt>Bram Cohen</dt><dd>Helped design our congestion control mechanisms,
292
+    in Tor's early days.</dd>
293
+    <dt>Pat Double</dt><dd>Creator of the Incognito LiveCD.</dd>
294
+    <dt>Geoff Goodell</dt><dd>Started the <a
295
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/blossom/trunk/">Blossom project</a>
296
+    which uses Tor as its overlay network; also helped motivate Tor's control
297
+    interface to be as flexible as it is.</dd>
298
+    <dt>Aleksei Gorny</dt><dd> Working on
299
+    Tor exit scanner improvements (<a
300
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewcvs.cgi/torflow/branches/gsoc2008/">svn</a>), originally started as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
301
+    <dt>Christian Grothoff</dt><dd> Contributed better daemonizing behavior.</dd>
302
+    <dt>Steven Hazel</dt><dd> Made 'make install' do the right thing.</dd>
303
+    <dt>Justin Hipple</dt><dd>The other developer for Vidalia.</dd>
304
+    <dt>Jason Holt</dt><dd> Contributed patches to the instructions and the man
305
+    page.</dd>
306
+    <dt>Christian King</dt><dd> Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of Code
307
+    on making Tor relays stable on
308
+    Windows, by developing a <a
309
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/libevent-urz/trunk/README">buffer
310
+    implementation for libevent</a>; mentored by Nick.</dd>
311
+    <dt>Joe Kowalski</dt><dd>Original author and provider of the torstatus
312
+    script formerly run on nighteffect.</dd>
313
+    <dt>Adam Langley</dt><dd>Our fine eventdns code.</dd>
314
+    <dt>Rebecca MacKinnon</dt><dd>Former Director of Tor.  Co-Founder of <a
315
+    href="http://www.globalvoicesonline.org/">Global Voices Online</a>.</dd>
316
+    <dt>Chris Palmer</dt><dd>Our liaison and tech guy with EFF while EFF
317
+    was funding us. Also helped advocate and write end-user docs.</dd>
318
+    <dt>Matej Pfajfar</dt><dd>Author of the original onion routing code that
319
+    Tor is based on, so we didn't have to start from scratch.</dd>
320
+    <dt>Johannes Renner</dt><dd> Worked during the 2007 Google Summer of
321
+    Code on modifying <a
322
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/svn/torflow/trunk/README">TorFlow</a>
323
+    to measure various properties of the Tor network; mentored by Mike
324
+    Perry.</dd>
325
+    <dt>Scott Squires</dt><dd>The original developer of <a
326
+    href="<page projects/torbutton>">Torbutton</a>.</dd>
327
+    <dt>Aaron Turner</dt><dd> Contributed the first version of the tor.sh
328
+    initscripts shell script.</dd>
329
+    <dt>Stephen Tyree</dt><dd> Worked during Google Summer of Code 2009 to
330
+    develop a plugin API for <a href="<page projects/vidalia>">Vidalia</a>
331
+    and create a plugin to allow HerdictWeb integration, a project aiming
332
+    at identifying website inaccessibility using user submissions.</dd>
333
+    <dt>Camilo Viecco</dt><dd> Worked on
334
+    Providing Blossom functionality to Vidalia (<a
335
+    href="http://trac.vidalia-project.net/browser/vidalia/branches/exit-country">svn</a>) as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
336
+    <dt>Fred von Lohmann</dt><dd>Fred served on our Board of Directors
337
+    from 2006 through 2009.   His complete bio can be found at the <a
338
+    href="http://www.eff.org/about/staff/?f=fred_von_lohmann.html">EFF
339
+    Staff Site</a>.</dd>
340
+    <dt>Christian Wilms</dt><dd> Worked on
341
+    Performance Enhancing Measures for Tor Hidden Services (<a
342
+    href="https://svn.torproject.org/cgi-bin/viewcvs.cgi/tor/branches/hidserv-perf/">svn</a>) as part of Google Summer of Code 2008.</dd>
343
+    <dt>Jillian C. York</dt><dd><a href="http://jilliancyork.com/">Jillian
344
+    C. York</a> is a writer, blogger, and activist based in
345
+    Boston.  She blogs on the uses of Tor and anonymity at <a
346
+    href="http://www.knightpulse.org/blog/tor">KnightPulse</a>.</dd>
347
+    </dl>
348
+  </div>
349
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
350
+  <div id = "sidecol">
351
+#include "side.wmi"
352
+#include "info.wmi"
353
+  </div>
354
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
355
+</div>
356
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
357
+#include <foot.wmi> 
0 358
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,63 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 2-medium
4
+
5
+# this structure defines the side nav bar for the /about pages
6
+# and is the input for include/side.wmi
7
+
8
+# fields:
9
+#
10
+# url - the path to the wml page, as used the the <page> tag. This tag ensures
11
+# that links will point to the current language if supported, and alternately
12
+# the english version 
13
+#
14
+# txt - the link text to be displayed. Different translations will
15
+# need to supply alternate txt
16
+
17
+<:
18
+  my $sidenav;
19
+  $sidenav = [
20
+      {'url'  => 'about/about',
21
+       'txt'  => 'Tor Overview',
22
+       'subelements' => [
23
+          {'url'  => 'about/why',
24
+           'txt'  => 'Why We Need Tor',
25
+          },
26
+          {'url'  => 'about/staying',
27
+           'txt'  => 'Staying Anonymous',
28
+          }, 
29
+          {'url'  => 'about/future',
30
+           'txt'  => 'Future of Tor',
31
+          }]
32
+      },
33
+      {'url'  => 'about/torusers',
34
+       'txt'  => 'Users of Tor',
35
+      },
36
+
37
+      {'url'  => 'about/corepeople',
38
+       'txt'  => 'Tor People',
39
+       'subelements' => [
40
+          {'url'  => 'about/board',
41
+           'txt'  => 'Board of Directors',
42
+          }, 
43
+          {'url'  => 'about/translators',
44
+           'txt'  => 'Translators',
45
+          }, 
46
+          {'url'  => 'about/volunteers',
47
+           'txt'  => 'Volunteers',
48
+          },  
49
+          {'url'  => 'about/contributors',
50
+           'txt'  => 'Past Contributors',
51
+          }]
52
+      },
53
+      {'url'  => 'about/sponsors',
54
+       'txt'  => 'Sponsors',
55
+      },
56
+      {'url'  => 'projects/clientside',
57
+       'txt'  => 'Projects',
58
+      }, 
59
+      {'url'  => 'docs/faq',
60
+       'txt'  => 'FAQ',
61
+      },  
62
+  ];
63
+:>
0 64
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,82 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 22225 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 3-low
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor: Sponsors" CHARSET="UTF-8"
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/sponsors>">Sponsors</a>
11
+  </div>
12
+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <h1>Tor: Sponsors</h1>
14
+    <p>
15
+    The Tor Project's <a href="<page about/torusers>">diversity of users</a> means we
16
+    have a diversity of funding sources too &mdash; and we're eager to diversify
17
+    even further! Our sponsorships are divided into levels based on total funding received:
18
+    </p>
19
+    
20
+    <h3><i>Magnoliophyta</i> (over $1 million)</h3>
21
+    	<ul>
22
+    		<li>You?</li>
23
+    	</ul>
24
+    
25
+    <h3><i>Liliopsida</i> (up to $750k)</h3>
26
+    	<ul>
27
+    		<li>An anonymous North American NGO (2008-2010)</li>
28
+    	</ul>
29
+    
30
+    <h3><i>Asparagales</i> (up to $500k)</h3>
31
+    	<ul>
32
+    		<li><a href="http://www.ibb.gov/">International Broadcasting Bureau</a> (2006-2010)</li>
33
+    		<li>An anonymous European NGO (2006-2008)</li>
34
+    	</ul>
35
+    
36
+    <h3><i>Alliaceae</i> (up to $200k)</h3>
37
+    	<ul>
38
+    		<li>You?</li>
39
+    	</ul>
40
+    
41
+    <h3><i>Allium</i> (up to $100k)</h3>
42
+    	<ul>
43
+    		<li><a href="http://www.nlnet.nl/">NLnet Foundation</a> (2008-2009)</li>
44
+    		<li><a href="http://chacs.nrl.navy.mil/">Naval Research Laboratory</a> (2006-2010)</li>
45
+    		<li>An anonymous North American ISP (2009-2010)</li>
46
+    	</ul>
47
+    
48
+    <h3><i>Allium cepa</i> (up to $50k)</h3>
49
+    	<ul>
50
+    		<li><a href="<page donate/donate>">More than 500 personal donations from individuals like you</a> (2006-2010)</li>
51
+    		<li><a href="http://code.google.com/opensource/">Google</a> (2008-2009)</li>
52
+    		<li><a href="http://code.google.com/soc/">Google Summer of Code</a> (2007-2009)</li>
53
+    		<li><a href="http://www.hrw.org/">Human Rights Watch</a> (2007)</li>
54
+    		<li><a href="http://www.torfox.org/">Torfox</a> (2009)</li>
55
+        <li><a href="http://www.shinjiru.com/">Shinjiru Technology</a> (2009-2010)</li>
56
+      </ul>
57
+    
58
+    <h3>Past sponsors</h3>
59
+    <p>We greatly appreciate the support provided by our past sponsors in keeping the pre-501(c)(3) Tor Project progressing through our ambitious goals:</p>
60
+    	<ul>
61
+    		<li><a href="https://www.eff.org/">Electronic Frontier Foundation</a> (2004-2005)</li>
62
+    		<li><a href="http://chacs.nrl.navy.mil/">DARPA and ONR via Naval Research Laboratory</a> (2001-2006)</li>
63
+    		<li><a href="http://www.cyber-ta.org/">Cyber-TA project</a> (2006-2008)</li>
64
+    		<li>Bell Security Solutions Inc (2006)</li>
65
+    		<li><a href="http://www.omidyar.net/">Omidyar Network Enzyme Grant</a> (2006)</li>
66
+    		<li><a href="http://seclab.cs.rice.edu/lab/2005/08/01/seclab-awarded-grant-to-study-security-of-p2p/">NSF via Rice University</a> (2006-2007)</li>
67
+    	</ul>
68
+    <p>Thank you to all the people and groups who have made Tor possible so
69
+    far, and thank you especially to the individual volunteers who have made
70
+    non-financial contributions: coding, testing, documenting, educating,
71
+    researching, and running the relays that make up the Tor network.
72
+    </p>
73
+  </div>
74
+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
75
+  <div id = "sidecol">
76
+#include "side.wmi"
77
+#include "info.wmi"
78
+  </div>
79
+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
80
+</div>
81
+<!-- END CONTENT -->
82
+#include <foot.wmi> 
0 83
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,42 @@
1
+## translation metadata
2
+# Revision: $Revision: 0 $
3
+# Translation-Priority: 2-medium
4
+
5
+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Tor Project: Staying Anonymous" CHARSET="UTF-8" <p>
6
+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
7
+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
8
+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
9
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/staying>">Staying Anonymous</a>
11
+  </div>
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+  <div id="maincol">
13
+    <h1>Staying anonymous</h1> 
14
+    
15
+    <p>
16
+    Tor can't solve all anonymity problems.  It focuses only on
17
+    protecting the transport of data.  You need to use protocol-specific
18
+    support software if you don't want the sites you visit to see your
19
+    identifying information. For example, you can use web proxies such as
20
+    Privoxy while web browsing to block cookies and withhold information
21
+    about your browser type.
22
+    </p>
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+    
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+    <p>
25
+    Also, to protect your anonymity, be smart.  Don't provide your name
26
+    or other revealing information in web forms.  Be aware that, like all
27
+    anonymizing networks that are fast enough for web browsing, Tor does not
28
+    provide protection against end-to-end timing attacks: If your attacker
29
+    can watch the traffic coming out of your computer, and also the traffic
30
+    arriving at your chosen destination, he can use statistical analysis to
31
+    discover that they are part of the same circuit.
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+    </p> 
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+  </div>
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+  <!-- END MAINCOL -->
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+  <div id = "sidecol">
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+#include "side.wmi"
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+#include "info.wmi"
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+  </div>
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+  <!-- END SIDECOL -->
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+</div>
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+<!-- END CONTENT -->
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+#include <foot.wmi> 
0 43
new file mode 100644
... ...
@@ -0,0 +1,343 @@
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+## translation metadata
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+# Revision: $Revision: 22261 $
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+# Translation-Priority: 2-medium
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+
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+#include "head.wmi" TITLE="Who uses Tor?" CHARSET="UTF-8"
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+
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+<div id="content" class="clearfix">
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+  <div id="breadcrumbs">
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+    <a href="<page home>">Home &raquo; </a>
10
+    <a href="<page about/about>">About &raquo; </a>
11
+    <a href="<page about/torusers>">Who Uses Tor</a>
12
+  </div>
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+  <div id="maincol">
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+
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+    <h1>Inception</h1>
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+    
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+    #<!-- BEGIN SIDEBAR -->
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+    #<div class="sidebar-left">
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+    #<h3>Who uses Tor?</h3>
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+    #<ul>
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+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#normalusers">Normal people use Tor</a></li>
22
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#military">Militaries use Tor</a></li>
23
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#journalist">Journalists and their audience use Tor</a></li>
24
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#lawenforcement">Law enforcement officers use Tor</a></li>
25
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#activists">Activists &amp; Whistleblowers use Tor</a></li>
26
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#spotlight">High &amp; low profile people use Tor</a></li>
27
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#executives">Business executives use Tor</a></li>
28
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#bloggers">Bloggers use Tor</a></li>
29
+    #<li><a href="<page about/torusers>#itprofessionals">IT Professionals use Tor</a></li>
30
+    #</ul>
31
+    #</div>
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+    #<!-- END SIDEBAR -->
33
+    
34
+    <hr />
35
+    <p>
36
+    Tor was originally designed, implemented, and deployed as a third-generation
37
+    <a href="http://www.onion-router.net/">onion routing project of the Naval Research Laboratory</a>.
38
+    It was originally developed with the U.S. Navy in mind, for the primary purpose of protecting government communications.
39
+    Today, it is used every day for a wide variety of purposes by the military, journalists, law enforcement officers, activists, and many others. Here are some of the specific uses we've seen or recommend.
40
+    </p>
41
+    
42
+    <a name="normalusers"></a>
43
+    <h2><a class="anchor" href="#normalusers">Normal people use Tor</a></h2>
44
+    <hr />
45
+    <ul>
46
+    <li><strong>They protect their privacy from unscrupulous marketers and identity thieves.</strong>
47
+    Internet Service Providers (ISPs) <a href="http://seekingalpha.com/article/29449-compete-ceo-isps-sell-clickstreams-for-5-a-month">
48
+    sell your Internet browsing records</a> to marketers or anyone else
49
+    willing to pay for it. ISPs typically say that
50
+    they anonymize the data by not providing personally identifiable information, but
51
+    <a href="http://www.wired.com/politics/security/news/2006/08/71579?currentPage=all">this
52
+    has proven incorrect</a>.  A full record of every site you visit, the text of every search you perform, and potentially
53
+    userid and even password information can still be part of this data.  In addition to your ISP, the websites (<a href="http://www.google.com/privacy_faq.html">and search engines</a>) you visit have their own logs, containing the same or more information.
54
+    </li>
55
+    <li><strong> They protect their communications from irresponsible corporations.</strong>
56
+    All over the Internet, Tor is being recommended to people newly concerned about their privacy in the face of increasing breaches and betrayals of
57
+    private data. From <a href="http://www.securityfocus.com/news/11048">lost backup tapes</a>, to
58
+    <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/09/technology/09aol.html?ex=1312776000&amp;en=f6f61949c6da4d38&amp;ei=5090">giving away the data to researchers</a>,
59
+    your data is often not well protected by those you are supposed to trust to keep it safe.
60
+    </li>
61
+    <li><strong>They protect their children online.</strong>
62
+    You've told your kids they shouldn't share personally identifying information online, but they may be sharing their location simply
63
+    by not concealing their IP address. Increasingly, IP addresses can be <a href="http://whatismyipaddress.com/">literally mapped to a city or even street location</a>, and can <a href="http://whatsmyip.org/more/">reveal other information</a> about how you are connecting to the Internet.
64
+    In the United States, the government is pushing to make this mapping increasingly precise.
65
+    </li>
66
+    <li><strong>They research sensitive topics.</strong>
67
+    There's a wealth of information available online. But perhaps in your country, access to information on AIDS, birth control,
68
+    <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/12/03/tech/main531567.shtml">Tibetan culture</a>,
69
+    or world religions is behind a national firewall.
70
+    </li>
71
+    </ul>
72
+    
73
+    <a name="military"></a>